1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

What is TRU-OIL made of??

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Tron, Jul 21, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Banned Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    6,665
    I've been playing around with different finishes and have come up with something that I like, but the only problem is the long dry time. I like Tru-oil because of it's relatively quick work time, but I feel that I can duplicate (or even improve upon it) for a fraction of the cost.

    Any thoughts??
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,420
    Tung oil works good. In the beginning diluted with solvent it dries faster and penetrates better. The last few coats cut back on the solvent. HMB
     
  3. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,052
    Location:
    Louisville, KY
    Tron:


    Tru-Oil is Linseed oil based with special driers added and will darken with age. It is a good product and is easy to use.


    Tung oil does not darken with age. It has been used for centuries to protect wood including boats and sailing ships dating back to the 13th century in China.


    I like Tung oil diluted with about 20 % mineral spirits. Tung oil comes from the seed of the Chinese Tung tree. If you do not dilute Tung oil, it takes forever to dry and does not penetrate as well IMO as diluted Tung oil. The word Tung in Chinese means heart and the Tung tree has heart shaped leaves.


    I have not refinished a lot of stocks but I used Tung oil on a new thumbhole stock for a 10/22 and it came out great. Don’t be in a hurry as it takes time to sand, apply, dry, re-sand, apply, dry, etc. I think that I had about two months total in the project.


    I re-oiled the stock of a 1903 Springfield with three coats of Linseed oil and it came out looking like it was made yesterday. It took about a week for each coat to really dry. This was a 1903 match rifle and it had no markings. If you have an old military rifle with stock cartouches or other markings, I would not refinish it as it hurts the collector value.


    I believe that the various manufactures, especially Winchester, had their own unique blends of Linseed or Tung oil and that some of the professional stock re-finishers claim that they can duplicate these finishes.


    I had Marlin re-blue and refinish a 1960's vintage Model 336RC in .35 Remington. They charged about $150 and kept the rifle for about 3 months. I came back looking better than new.


    Good luck with your project. Time and patience are the key.


    Ed Ward
     
  4. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,753
    Look at Permalyn. I like it better than Tru-oil. It looks like and oil but is a polymer that dries quick and is easy to refinish like Tru-oil. It is also a tough finish.
     
  5. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,959
    Pro custom oil available through Brownells.
    The old tru-Oil was the best but the new stuff is not anything like 30 years ago. Joe goldberg
     
  6. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,261
    Be very careful how you dispose of rags with Linseed oil on them. Cases of spontanious combustion have happened.
     
  7. omgb

    omgb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,759
    Location:
    Santa Clarita, CA
    Any of the oil based finishes can be made to dry faster by adding Japan dryer available at art stores. I use boiled linseed oil mixed with Japan Dryer. Looks good, and it's cheap.
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    TRU-OIL is a blend of linseed oil (the carrier) and a urathane based finish. It does make a nice finish, but it is not an oil finish.

    The key to getting a good finish is not so much the product that is used, but how it is used. Step 1- Sand the raw wood smooth, 120 to 180 grit paper will do most of this. Final light sanding with 220 and 280 grit paper. Step 2- Stain wood if desired Step 3- use a quick drying finish to fill the pores. Put on rather heavy coats and sand them back down to very near the wood surface. This takes several coats. Keep doing this until no wood pores show with sanding. 150 grit paper will work fine sanding down the filler coats. Sand with finer paper prior to putting on the finish coats. Step 4- apply a few coats of finish, sand with very fine paper between each coat or every other coat. Use fine steel wool after the last finish coat is applied. This is the first time steel wool should touch the stock. Step 5- Polish by hand or with a fluffy buffing wheel on a drill press.

    If you sand the filler coat down into the stained wood or if you sand/polish the finish coats down to the filler coats, you get to start all over again.

    Pat Ireland
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page
dilute tru oil
,

what is tru oil made of

,
what to use to dilute tru oil