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WHAT IS GLASS BEDDING & WHAT IS IT USED FOR?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by senior smoke, Jan 10, 2008.

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  1. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    HELLO:
    what is glass bedding and what is it used for? what colors does it come in, and where do you get it? is it easy to use, and how long does it take to set?
    steve balistreri
     
  2. N. J. BOB

    N. J. BOB Active Member

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    Alert Troll, Troll
     
  3. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    What are you going to use it for?
     
  4. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    If your glass is tired, you can put it there.

    Q: What's a pussy stretcher?

    A: A thing to carry sick cats to the vet on.

    HM
     
  5. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Bedding rifle barrels and actions. No use in shotguns.
     
  6. rjdden

    rjdden TS Member

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    I maybe wrong on this and others will have something different on this as well, but, here goes. Glass bedding is layed down fiberglass as a bedding in the stock of your rifle so as to buffer recoil when the weapon is discharged. It makes the barrel and receiver snugger to the stock, and keeps the barrel from jumping up off the stock. Which happens often. I don't mean come completely out just rises some. Many of the major manufacturers are using an aluminum bar cut and ground out to where the receiver fits together with it. in the stock that is fit to the receiver. This does the same and much more as the weapon is discharged. Which one works the best is up to you to decide. I've heard pros and cons on both. And, none of them mounted to to much. They both work fairly well for this.


    Rich,(inPeoria,A/Z/)
     
  7. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    It may come in different forms, but the glass bedding i'm familiar with is Acraglass from brownells. Its very similar to epoxy. It does have a use for shotguns (which is what i'm presuming your asking about), bedding actions to stocks, and irons to forends, to strengthen the wood and stop existing cracks, or prevent future cracks. I used it on a kolar stock after it developed a hairline crack when I dropped it on my bedroom floor (d'oh), and the crack never spread after that. Acraglass comes in brown for wood stocks, and black for synthetic. For rifles, its mainly used to get a perfect fit between the barrelled action, and the stock. The current trend in rifles seems to be free-floating the barrels however.

    You can order acraglass from browells.com. It comes with a release agent, use plenty of it, if you miss a spot the stock will be difficult to remove. Acraglass cures QUICK, so have everything ready to go when you mix it.
     
  8. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    hello again:
    once you use glass bedding, can you ever take it off?
    steve balistreri
     
  9. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    if you do it right, no, it bonds to the substrate permanently, and you would have to remove it the way you would remove excess wood (scraping, grinding, sanding).
     
  10. 2@8lo

    2@8lo TS Member

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    Shot410 there is a use for it in shotguns also in fact I am just about ready to glass bed two stocks that I made for my sons guns.You glass bed where you have inletted the stock to fit your reciever,It fills any gaps or imperfections that might show also will strengthen the stock and will be less likley to crack or stress.Brownells sells kits, get the gel type.Fairly easy to use sets up pretty quick (10-15 min)Just make sure that you have release agent( covering all metal parts that you don't want the glass to stick too otherwise in 10-15 minutes it's a permanant situation.
     
  11. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    The longer it takes to cure the stronger it is. You can make it whatever color you like by adding a little dye when you mix it. Devcon Plastic Steel available at your local hardware store is a very good bedding epoxy. It is 80% steel powder and is very strong. It is a favorite bedding compound used by bench rest shooters. Use paste floor wax as a release agent. And use a light bulb to keep the area being bedded warm, this helps the epoxy cure. HMB
     
  12. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    If you've never done a bedding job before you are better off having it done be someone who has. The purpose of glass bedding the action is simply to make it more rigid in the stock. The purpose of bedding the barrel is to dampen firing vibration by creating a short point of contact between the barrel and the stock near the end of the stock. The location of that point is not always the same depending on the barrel being used. It is important to get the correct amount of pressure between the barrel and the bed for consistent performance.

    I've always used MarineTech filled epoxy resin (metal filled) because it has a thick consistency like PlayDo.

    Morgan
     
  13. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Steve It's best to leave the glassbedding to a stockmaker. If you make a mistake you will probibaly at best end up with a stock which will never come off the action and at worse an inoperable gun. On the brite side its glassed so water won't effect your new canoe paddle. joe goldberg
     
  14. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    I've used lots of Acraglass Gel, it does not set up quickly as has been stated. You have aprox. 25 min to work with it. Should be left to harden 10 hrs.
     
  15. Hipshot 3

    Hipshot 3 TS Member

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    I thought it was what them Indians folks over there sleep on?
     
  16. Jerry944t

    Jerry944t Well-Known Member

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    Glass bedding, when used by a novice, is used to permanently attach wood to metal. Please don't ask how I know this as it brings back some emotional scars.

    That is why so many are advising you, if you have the need, to have it done by a pro.
     
  17. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    You can do it. Give it a try. Anything you do not want the epoxy to stick to put a coat of wax on. Any place you do not want the epoxy to go use modeling clay to block its passage. And don't forget to put wax on the bedding screw threads. HMB
     
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