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what is best kind reloader for rifles?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Sharp Shooter18, Dec 14, 2009.

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  1. Sharp Shooter18

    Sharp Shooter18 TS Member

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    Im looking to buy a realoader to reload my shells alot cheaper and wondering if anyone had any tips on what would be best for a .222 .223 .243. 30-06 and 22-250
     
  2. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    Any good single stage press will do. I use an old C-H "C" press that I bought when I started loading for rifles and pistols over 40 years ago. Still works just as good as ever. Get top quality dies......all mine are RCBS.

    John C. Saubak
     
  3. rifle guy

    rifle guy TS Member

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    What volume are you planning to load?
    that will dictate the single stage v. progressive choice.

    You need much more than just a "reloader" or press. you will need a tumbler, trimmer, id/od neck chamferer, case lube,dies powder flipper, and some other stuff...

    It is defiantly a money saver with the larger rifles and should pay for itself in no time.

    I suggest starting single stage and later moving to progressive so you can learn the basics of each dies functioning before they are all running at the same time and things go crunch.

    For single stage presses the RCBS, hornady, redding, and forster. make great ones and the lees are ok too.

    For progressive presses Dillon and hornady seem to be the top with RCBS having an overpriced model also. (personal opinion)

    I use a RCBS rockchucker single stage, a Hornady progressive and am more than pleased with them both.

    Hope this helps get you started.
     
  4. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    The three best loaders for rifle and pistol are the Dillon, the Dillon, and the Dillon; especially the one with the "No BS Lifetime Warranty.".......Bob Dodd
     
  5. jagrdawger

    jagrdawger TS Member

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    This question might be better answered on 24 hour campfire or predator masters. Volume will dictate a lot of the decision.

    If you are looking for accuracy and not volume the Forster Co-ax is the top line threaded die press. This is what the top sniper agencies in the government use for good reason. They cost a little more than the RCBS, Redding, etc. but they are sweet and live up to the billing.
     
  6. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    <em>"This is what the top sniper agencies in the government use for good reason."</em>

    The good reason "IS" the taxpayers are footing the bill.

    Any good press will do.....most benchrest shooters only use a press to resize. With the right dies you could almost get by with a vise.

    I've seen 4-6" 1000yd ammo loaded on an old lyman turret press.

    Spend your money on good dies and a good scale....a trick press won't make trick ammo.
     
  7. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Single stage first for sure- RCBS is kind of the gold standard- I like Redding but its up to you.

    Remember- its pretty easy to blow up a gun- injure yourself- kill yourself etc with the pressures involved- so you dont need speed- you need precision

    Regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  8. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    The RCBS Master Reloading Kit and RCBS Accessory kit will get you most of what you will need to get started. The RCBS Master Reloading Kit will include the latest Speer reloading manual which is like a "bible" to many reloaders. This manual has a well illustrated guide for beginning metallic cartridge reloaders.

    You will still need to buy dies for each caliber plus a tumbler and media and various things like ammo storage boxes, labels, bullet puller, broken case extractor and specialized tools for case forming and determining optimal cartridge over all length in specific rifles. Redding dies are my favorite but RCBS dies are very good. RCBS has superior customer service.

    I spend the majority of my reloading time in case preparation. Metallic reloading is a lot different than shot shell reloading in the area of case preparation.

    Start with a single stage tool as you will always find a use for a single stage press for case forming or load development. If you are in need of a high volume press, you can't go wrong with Dillon.

    Be safe and never, never, never exceed published data for metallic cartridges.

    A very good "all around" powder for the cartridges you mention is IMR 4895. It may not yield the fastest load in any specific cartridge but it works well at less than maximum loads.

    As you start out, go for safety and not the highest velocity.

    Read the manual and reread the manual. Did I mention reading the manual? Read it.

    As you get more into accuracy shooting, you will also get more into cleaning your rifle. Don't forget proper cleaning supplies.

    Ed Ward
     
  9. brent375hh

    brent375hh TS Member

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    It's hard to go wrong with a Rockchucker and Redding dies, measure & scale.
     
  10. jagrdawger

    jagrdawger TS Member

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    The cost difference between a Forster and the green presses in not that large that it takes the govt. to afford. Our snipers simply demand the best ammo. Forster uses plain old physics to give them that. No trick just good geometry. Eliminating concentricity error goes along way towards gaining accuracy.

    "Any good press will do" is kind of like "any shotgun can be used to shoot trap".

    I've had and used an RCBS RC IV with great results. But, I found the Forster to be better, plus I like the die change system.

    Most benchrest shooters do very little resizing (they mainly neck size or shoulder bump), they use a press for other functions such as bullet seating and most use an arbor press. Arbors are very accurate, but very slow.

    But, the thread said best. Most reloaders have never used a Forster to any significant degree. Try one and you may like it.
     
  11. cottondoctor

    cottondoctor Member

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    Most top bench rest shooters use custom dies in an arbor press - they spend hours in case preparation (turning necks – sorting by weight – sorting by case thickness uniformity – uniform primer pocket depth-uniform flash holes – removing any burs from inside flash holes – etc etc etc) and just a few minutes loading, often while at the shooting bench (setting charges by weight for information purposes but charging the case by volume using a high quality powder thrower or measure) ,,,,,The ones that I know that use a press for threaded dies - use either a Forester-Bonanza Co-AX or a Redding or a custon built one and generally Redding bench rest dies----------just depends on how serious you want to be-----if not too serious just get a press and dies ---as you shoot and learn more - you will eventually gravitate to either a Redding or a Bonanza using Redding or Forester bench rest bushing dies...........if you are not planning to shoot a lot (I know "a lot" is a relative term) do not expect to save any money by investing in reloading equipment.......and unless you have high quality rifles and are a very good marksman - don’t expect a significant increase in accuracy or performance of reloaded ammo over factory ammo (again - depends on the rifle and the shooters ability).....BUT – reloading is an interesting avocation----
     
  12. poacherjoe

    poacherjoe Well-Known Member

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    RCBS or Dillon ,Both are lifetime gaurantee!!Get the equipment you need from ebay it is alot cheaper than buying the kit from say cabelas!
     
  13. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    I like the kind of reloder that after shes done reloading a couple of flats will go out and retrieve beer and pizza for you so dont miss any ofthe football game halftime show
     
  14. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I am a big fan of the Dillon 550 for both rifle and pistol ammo because you can make good ammo in quantity. I also have a RCBS Rock Chucker bolted to the bench which I have been using since 1972 and I have made lots of good ammo with it.

    Since you mentioned mostly .22 centerfires in your cartridge list I will give you a warning about using a progressive for these shells which is that the extruded powders don't flow well through the small diameter drop tube in the charging station. This can be dangerous because what you get is an undercharge followed by an overcharge if and when bridging occurs in the drop tube. The solution is to use a ball powder like H380 or a very short cut extruded powder.

    I do load .22-250 ammo on my Dillon and the quality of that ammo is as good as what I can do with the single stage provided I avoid the powder bridging problem mentioned above.
     
  15. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    I'll step off my attempt at humor above and explain. I loaded pistol with a Dillon 550B for many years into and through the 90s. When I had a custom 257 Ackley Improved built, I decided to have the RCBS Rock Chucker on the bench so I could have precise ammo for it; nothing but single steps and finite accuracy of components/loads. The Dillon folks argued with me strongly that the 550B would be expected to match what I could do with the RCBS and likely even better it. They were right! I finally abandoned the RCBS for the Dillon using what worked best and posted many 100 yard targets with 5 shots in the low .30" scores with ammo from that progressive Dillon. It also provided flawless .38 special, .357 mag, .45 ACP, and .30 M1 Carbine before I pitched it all in for clay birds and shotguns exclusively. Just my experience......Bob Dodd
     
  16. Sigraph

    Sigraph TS Member

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    If your on a budget, a Lee challenger kit will save you a lot of money. It's cheap, and the quality is good. I won't argue that an RCBS or Redding is better, but I guarantee you if you take care of the press it will last you a lifetime.
     
  17. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    lately I've had a ball loading my revolver and lever gun cartridges with a Lee Hand press..I set up a folding table and load while I'm watching my favorite hunting or shooting program
     
  18. Pocatello

    Pocatello Active Member

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    For me it is a question of volume. I shoot thousands of shotgun shells a year, so I use a high-volume press (Dillon SL 900). I don't even shoot dozens of rifle shells per year, so go with my old RCBS JR. For example, this year I shot three rounds with my 6 mm Remington to check the zero (it was still good). I decided to use 140 gr bullets instead of 160 gr in my .280 for hunting this year, so used about six rounds to reset the zero, and one from the sit at hunting distances to check that I can still shoot that way (I can). I used one on my muley buck, and one on my cow elk. I didn't shoot or load any for my .220 Swift, .257 Roberts, .25-06, 7x57, .300 Weatherby, my son's .270. or my nephew's .30-06, but still have dies (all RCBS), brass, bullets, powder etc. for all.
     
  19. cdan12

    cdan12 TS Member

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    For the money,you can't beat lee, I have 3 loadmasters that I load several pistol and rifle loads on,there is a learning curve ,but that is true with all of them. The lee problem (and all others ) is the priming part.I now prime and size in one step and powder bullit and crimp in another,this works perfect and I can load several hundred quality .223 ,.45 acp etc. in an hour.They all go bang and hit what I aim at, Dan Witcher
     
  20. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Fact is a reloading press has very little to do with the accuracy of your ammo.

    I have yet to see a press win a rifle match.

    The poster asked for advice, to load "CHEAPER".... That's pretty obvious he's not looking to set records,.....and the one's that do, don't drag around all that overpriced hardware.

    It's in the die's,brass,bullets,powder,barrels and chambers and your attention to detail that makes for high end ammo not high priced presses.
     
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