1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

what does reloading save you?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by chadmillard, Sep 10, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. chadmillard

    chadmillard TS Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    18
    When you reload, what does it make a box of shells cost?

    And how much would you say you save annually by doing so?
     
  2. chadmillard

    chadmillard TS Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    18
    When you reload, what does it make a box of shells cost?

    And how much would you say you save annually by doing so?
     
  3. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Messages:
    5,414
    Location:
    Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
    not enough so thats why I quite relaoding in '92.
     
  4. esoxhunter

    esoxhunter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    2,063
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Saving money on reloads is kind of a "bonus". I reload because I like to load a recipe that allows me to "meet my needs". To me reloading is a part of the shooting experience and I enjoy experimenting with loads that meet my needs. That being said, I feel that one can save $1 a box or more if you utilize common sense in purchasing components. Bottom line; if you have no interest in reloading and time is a concern, buy new shells. Ed
     
  5. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,003
    I can load a custom shell that patterns well in my own gun. I use premium components and get a premium shell for less than the price of the "Bargain" shells. I have confidence in my own loads and they have never failed me on the line when it counts.

    What do I save? Enough to help cover the cost of fuel and shooting. Every dollar counts these days. I also save my sanity, since it is one of those "My Time" things I do to relax. For rifle loads, I do even better on costs and Handgun loading saves a considerable amount too. My Varmint rifles will shoot into groups one third the size of most factory ammo. I have a 30-06 that shoots like the varmint rifles. All done with reloads.
     
  6. ec90t

    ec90t Guest

    I'm a half and half reloader. I reload shells that I can't purchase, ie, it's hard to find 7/8 oz 8 1/2's 12ga in a factory loading. I buy standard 3 dr loads for my trap/sporting shooting. I use specialty loadings for the first shot of doubles and back up loads for game shooting.

    ec90t
     
  7. dmarbell

    dmarbell Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2006
    Messages:
    1,572
    At current component prices from my club, I can reload 1 1/8 oz. loads for $4.73 and 1 oz. loads for $4.41. That's with no cost for hulls, as I pick them up for free.

    I might not be saving much, but I have a steady supply without running around to several Dick's and Wal-Mart to check on their supplies. And, I haven't found the 1 oz. loads for anywhere near the above cost. I also load some 7/8 oz. trap practice loads and skeet loads. Try pricing those for 12 gauge.

    Danny
     
  8. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,680
    Presently I only reload my handicap loads (7-1/2's at 1250 fps, 1-1/8 oz.) which I estimate saves me at least $30.00 - $35.00 per flat vs. new "Premium" loads.

    Curt
     
  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    I believe my reloads are comparable to new premium factory shells and better than discount shells. Compared to the price of premium shells, I save about $2.50 a box and about $1.00 a box when compared to discount shells. But, that does allow me to shoot premium shells a little cheaper than discount shells.

    If I were to depreciate the cost of my press and pro-rate the square feet in my reloading room against my total housing expenses, I might just buy shells. But, reloading can be a good way to mentally prepare for an upcoming shoot. About 1/3 of the shells I shoot are new AA shells, the remainder are reloads.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,521
    Location:
    Idaho
    chad - you have a PM
     
  11. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,362
    Location:
    Prairie State
    I'm a grubber and reload steel, so my reloading may not be indicative, but factory shells are running upwards $7+/box.

    Based upon $1/#/steel +$0.025 primer + $0.012 wad + $12/#/powder, I'm under $3 a box. I harvest hulls and have a 12 year old progressive reloader...

    $4/box not counting my time - but I get something for that also...

    Jay
     
  12. ronbo142

    ronbo142 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,038
    In the sub-gauge ie. 28 and .410 right now huge. Reloading for me is also a great way to spend some time clearning the mind doing a repetiive task.

    Ronbo
     
  13. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,680
    Steel? Whatever for?

    Curt
     
  14. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,594
    Like the rest, I reload for the enjoyable experience, to craft custom loads that are not obtainable on the market, and because I have supreme confidence in them. I consider reloading a separate and nearly equal discipline in the shooting experience just as I enjoy shooting as many different disciplines as possible. Do I save money too? Sure as long as I don't want to factor in my time (retired anyway) and I've paid for the loaders many times over; a Grabber from the mid-70s, a 9000H, and a Dillon metallic cartridge from the 80s. I scrounge shells, I shop for component prices and buy from vendors supplying clubs. Reload? Yup, for many reasons, including saving cash.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  15. pendennis

    pendennis Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2007
    Messages:
    1,567
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan - O/S Detroit
    Right now I spend about $.165/round ($4.13/box) for reloads. As with others, I don't count the cost of hulls or the press. For example, a MEC 9000G runs somewhere over $400. You should be able to get at least 100k rounds through it with minimal maintenance.

    With lead decreasing in price, the cost for a AA-type hull reload is falling rapidly, while ammunition is holding its high cost. Prices are running about $78/flat for AA's or STS', and those are prices set early this year when lead was up around $1.80/lb on the metal exchanges. Primers have also gone up in price, and they run about $130/5k.

    I also like reloading for the sake of the hobby.

    Best,
    Dennis
     
  16. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,362
    Location:
    Prairie State
    Curtster...

    Some ranges shoot over/into water and wetlands and in our case, we have the dubious distinction of acquiring the first EPA NPDES permit to discharge a pollutant into Waters of the US. While some cases have succesfully fought that - we were #1 and while we lost the battle we won the war (still shooting), but require non-lead shot - so we shoot steel and tons of it! (since 2001)

    Just began offering ATA registered last month with our 2nd shoot in October. Steel is no big deal and right now... a bargain compared to lead.

    Jay
     
  17. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2007
    Messages:
    6,263
    Loading my own saves me from doing something less productive (like watching TV)and it is a great way to unwind and forget about the every day grind for awhile. Also I buy components in bulk so I can generally crank out any kind of ammo any time I want it. (No running to Wally World for a four pack). Dollars per case savings? Well I wish that were a significant factor but it's not for me anyway.
     
  18. John Thompson

    John Thompson TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Messages:
    756
    I use premium shot,slow rate powder, oem wads & primers and load on a hydraulic PW. From data in numerous articles I have learned that I can expect a more consistent FPS from my setup than I will get from new first rate Factory loads. I have shot low end shells and have opened some, the shot is not nearly as consistent in size or coloration (inconsistent chemistry). I load for the same or a little less than new cheapies according to the cost calculator on this site.
     
  19. fearlessfain

    fearlessfain TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2006
    Messages:
    520
    you may pick up the hulls for free, but they still have a value and must be figured in the cost.
     
  20. powderburn

    powderburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Anderson, IN
    Hi!
    The thing that I like the most, like others have said, is to make a shell you can't buy. I load everything down as far as powder and shot. two important reasons: cost per box and recoil. The more years you shoot, you will become weary of recoil. I don't believe a release trigger is the answer for flinching. The real answer is those guys have become recoil conscious (whether they want to admit it or not) and have not learned that loading shells down actually helps your pattern, and that extra 1/8 oz. of shot just rattles and bangs it's way out the barrel and becomes flyers anyway. A good recipe for a one oz. load is the most versatile load you can load. It'll break them at 27, it'll smash them in skeet, and is a super sporting clays load. The loading manuals are a good tool, but they all tend to load hot, thumping loads. If you find a 1 oz. load in a manual, try it for a while, and then back off the powder a bit. Maybe only a powder bushing down or two. Yes, you will lose a little speed, but the only time you'll notice is past the 27 on a shootoff or something.
    Reloading is a joy to me. A big glass of iced tea, a Cubs game on the telly, and my MEC 600 Jr. is all it takes for enjoyment. It's not the most money-saving thing anymore. I think the rise in components are making people "settle" and buy the new crap from the Dick's, Wal-M, etc. and I will not buy that crap until I absolutely have to. If you get into reloading, you'll have fun beating the stores and not beating yourself up with recoil. That's about it. Have fun shooting and smash em all.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.