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What distance for prescription works well?

Discussion in 'Shoot Information, EVENTS, Clinics & Results' started by mark936, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. mark936

    mark936 Member

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    I wear trifocals and both eyes different -- anyone have better success with a single prescription? I shoot 20yd caps since I just started.
    Thanks, mark
     
  2. 7mag

    7mag Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mark give Frank Rively a call he may be able to answer your questions.
     
  3. bossbasl

    bossbasl Well-Known Member

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    Get a new Rx and give Mike a call @ Post4.
     
  4. cottondoctor

    cottondoctor Member

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    I suspect single vision is what you want for shooting.
    Another reference to give Frank Rively a call....
     
  5. puablo

    puablo Well-Known Member

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    Frank is very good at it!
     
  6. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    They tried to sell me progressive bi-focals with a guarantee they would replace then with just a distance correction if I didn't like them. Hated them. Made me appreciate how much I use my peripheral vision. Replacements have been great. My on gun eye was a little fuzzy when I first put my new glasses on, so they re-tested and upped the strength one notch. Have been great ever since.
     
  7. Robb

    Robb Member

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    I wear single vision but a buddy uses bi- focals as he can't read the score sheet without them.
     
  8. zzoom

    zzoom Member

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    "Everyone" told me to get single vision shooting glasses even though I have worn progressive bifocals for years, so I did. What an expenive mistake. Could shoot ok with them, but nothing else. Had trouble walking, could not read or see anything. Found local optician who was also a shooter. Just shook his head, then made me a pair of glasses with progressive lens, my shooting average increased more than youbcan imagine. Can put them on when arriving at club and leave them on till I leave. So much better than single vision. Just my experience, yours may vary....
     
  9. hunter44

    hunter44 Well-Known Member

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    zzoom, My experience is exactly as yours.............put my shooting glasses on in the morning & wear them all day for shooting, reading, whatever.
     
  10. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    the vast majority of shooters will hate progressive lenses....

    an expensive experiment. single vision for most.

    as an aside, I use a 1.25 reader for pistol shooting...
     
  11. bcnu

    bcnu Active Member

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    When I get glass', I take an unbroken target with me and tell the eye guy that I want to be able to see this, flying through the air at 44 mph at 35 yards out. Failing in that, if you go see Frank Rivley, he will fix you right up. John
     
  12. mark936

    mark936 Member

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    Thanks for advice.
     
  13. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    I should add that I only need a distance correction. I don't wear glasses for reading or computing, but need them for driving and shooting. So my bifocals had a distance correction up top and no correction down at the bottom. Other shooters surely need the inverse and some need corrections for both, hence mixed results.
     
  14. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    Sometime I shoot with my progressive glasses and I do as well with them as my shooting glasses. The distance section of progressives is the top section of the lens where you are looking when you head is on the stock. I don't know why you have to know how far away the targets are because your lenses are set at infinity for anything over short distances.
     
  15. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    If you live in the Phoenix area ... I have a great, shooting experienced OD for you. Decot recommends him highly.
     
  16. Seitz Shooter

    Seitz Shooter Member

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    My shooting glasses have bifocals and I've shot with my regular trifocals and both work fine.

    I'm looking through the upper distance part of the lens, so the bi or trifocal part of the lens doesn't come into play.

    Adios, Dirk
     
  17. dhwbailey

    dhwbailey Member

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    If you can't read with your distance lense, you will go batty with single vision. You won't be able to see your shells when you load your gun, and you sure won't be able to read anything.

    I shoot with progressive bifocals and have absolutely no trouble.

    It takes some getting used to, but once you get it, it's worth the adjustment.

    With peripheral vision, you don't see clearly so prescription or not doesn't matter.
     
  18. Iceman47

    Iceman47 Member

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    I started shooting with my bi-focals and soon learned that it was much better to get another set of glasses specifically for shooting that were just the distance portion of my prescription. I was able to get the lenses in a yellow tint and it has made a big difference in my scores. Well, the glasses and finally being able to shoot on a regular basis every week.lol
    Vincent
     
  19. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    I have two very expensive pairs of progressives, one for distance and one for computer. I've gotten used to the set for the computer, because bifocals no longer worked, and I had to. The distance set is essentially worthless. Nothing I normally want to look at is in focus unless I tilt my head up and down. They are a disaster for driving because you really, really do need your peripheral vision, and you move your eyes to the left or right while checking traffic (because you can't turn your head far enough)to turn, change lanes, etc.

    I spent a fortune on the supposedly next to best type of progressive. The peripheral performance is nowhere near as good as represented. So, I'd expect the really expensive ($800 for lenses only) ones that promise perfect peripheral vision (from the same firm) would disappoint as well.

    I cannot shoot in progressives. I tried bifocals- too dangerous to walk in, especially at the places I shoot. I now have all single vision lenses and am much happier for it.

    You don't say what your prescription is. My recommendation is to get the distance correction only and not include any astimatic correction.

    Your regular distance prescription used in your single vision dress/everyday glasses may not work for shooting glasses. First, tell the eye doc you want as close to perfect sharpness at 25 yards, or more if you are a slow shooter. Infinity to most eye docs is actually closer than that, so they tend to slightly over prescribe. It works in everyday life, but not for shooting glasses.

    Another thing to consider is the size of the lenses. Your everyday pair of single vision will typically be in the 49mm to 53mm range. That is considerably smaller than shooting glasses will be. It makes a difference. So does base curve and the thickness of shooting glasses, especially the new ones that meet ANSI specs. The stronger your everyday single vision prescription is, the more likely you will need a lighter prescription in your shooting glasses.

    The everyday glasses single vision made to my new prescription work wonderfully and restore my vision to 20/15 left and 20/20 right. However, that prescription did not work in my new Randolph Edge glasses with thick poly lenses. It literally hurt to wear them, and no amount of "getting used to them" helped. The prescription for my right eye had to be reduced by .25 diopter to make them wearable. Reducing by a slight bit more would have made them perfect. The reason is your eye can easily adapt to add more diopter if needed, but can't go the other way. It will try, and keep on trying, and the effort will make your eye sore and give you a headache. That's why it is important to tell the doc you want optimization for distance (tell him what range). He will test and give you choices. If he narrows it down to two and you say either looks the best, do one of two things. Either take the weaker of the two offerings (they will be close together), or tell the doc to make the prescription in the middle. Usually they want to round out to .25 diopter, because that's the smallest increment their machines use. However, some firms such as Morgan Optical will grind your lenses in smaller increments.

    Don't forget to have a good, long talk with the doc who will be making your shooting glasses. Tell him what your expectations are, and he will explain your options. Also, give him your full prescription, including the correction for astigmatism, ESPECIALLY if you are not going to have it included in your shooting glasses. The reason is you can write the prescription in two ways- a lower diopter distance and a + diopter astigmatic correction, or a higher diopter for distance with a - correction for astigmatism. Trust me, it makes a difference.
     
  20. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    I really don't agree with much of what ZZT has written-at least as it pertains to my personal experience. Extreme peripheral correction really doesn't mean much unless your glasses completely wrap around your head. You're always going to be looking past the corner of your glasses.


    As far as setting for a specific distance, I could be wrong but I've never heard of an optometrist doing that. Besides, what distance would you set it for? 16 yards when the target comes out of the house; 20 yards while you're tracking it; 24 yards when you're getting ready to pull the trigger?


    I have single vision with a small bifocal for my shooting glasses. Sometimes I shoot with progressives where I'm looking through the top half of the lens. While peripheral vision
    helps picking up a target in skeet or sporting clays you're
    not using it much in trap where you're following the target with your
    head on the stock.