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Way OT. No-till farming

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by handlepuller, Jul 17, 2011.

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  1. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    For various reasons, I think this may be the way to go for me.

    I don't farm for a harvest, just plant about 20 acres of food plots each year for hunting. In order to avoid having to plow each year I've been researching no till. I'm thinking I could alternate corn and soybeans each year.

    Anyone have any input? Plots are smallish, range from .5-5 acres.
     
  2. rcnuti

    rcnuti TS Member

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    Handlepuller,

    Email me, I would be happy to discuss options and ideas with you. I need to know where your farm is, soil type, topography, rainfall distribution, etc. It would also be helpfull to know what existing equipment you have, budget, and time. I have done lots of research in this area.

    Russell Nuti
     
  3. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Handlepuller,

    Here in eastern Virginia, most everybody has gone to no-till. It's great for wind erosion and it helps keep moisture in the top soil. We top cut the wheat and plant the soybeans in the next two or three days. After corn, we usually will disk and harrow and go right to winter wheat.
     
  4. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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    Handlepuller - With no-till you'll be putting lot's of herbicides on your hunting property. Is that something you want?
     
  5. Danby

    Danby Member

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    no-till is the way to go since your not harvesting you won't need a bunch of chemicals I plant rye in the fall and then no-till corn into that in the spring the wildlife get 2 crops at once the rye matures and dies and the corn comes up through that this also controls the weed problems or you can spray roundup on the rye early and just use it for weed control lots of wats to do wildlife no-til This works great in Ohio
     
  6. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    Contact Biologic. They have experts that will help for free. They claim they can grow food plots in a concrete parking lot. But sure the above advice is expert also. Just a suggestion.

    Good luck! milt
     
  7. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the input so far. Russell, I emailed you and we should talk.

    I already spray since I plant round up ready corn and beans, from what I understand of no-til, not disturbing the soil actually leads to fewer weeds as you progress.

    The corn won't be harvested because I want to leave it out for the deer and pheasants to help them through the Minnesota winter. I would plan on just mowing it in the spring and then the thought was to plant beans. I was thinking to alternate corn and beans that way. Feasible? I'm not sure how I would work in winter wheat or rye if the corn is still there in the fall.
     
  8. mrskeet410

    mrskeet410 TS Member

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    Isn't milo a good crop for game/wildlife?
     
  9. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    We plant Chicory and Lab Lab all mixed together with red and white clovers. Its basically the same as the "Big Name" food plot mixes. We mow it a few times a year and let it seed at least once a year. We will spray Hi-Yield and then plow and re-plant about every three years as weed tends to take over. This mixture also works great for Turkey.


    I have still had my best luck hunting over Winter Wheat fields with growth at just sprouted to about 3" high. The whitetail tend to be turned off after the wheat reaches about 5" high. I have heard the wheat turns bitter to the deer after growth reaches 5" and higher however i haven't personally asked one. :)
     
  10. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    You may want to split your plot, 1/2 beans and 1/2 corn. We have noticed that the deer quit eating corn and switch to beans at various times of the year. I don't know if the corn gets spoiled after a while, but they difinitely prefer to eat beans in January around here. They will paw through the snow to eat beans, but not corn.
     
  11. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    That's kind of what I was thinking I'd do Setterman. They LOVE the protein in those beans in mid winter.

    I've got about 9 plots, 20 acres total, and would alternate half and half.
     
  12. dolphinbank

    dolphinbank TS Member

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    I live in North Central Oregon and we have been converting to No-Till over the last 30 years. I would recommend you discuss your plans with your local Farm Service Agency. They have volumns of info and can help with recommendations and resources. No-Till is a good choice but requires the right plan, equipment and correct use of chemicals. We have found that it takes several rotations before the best yeilds are reached. rsp/Lonny
     
  13. John Galt

    John Galt TS Member

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    Puller, you might want to price no till grain drills before you get too excited about no till farming. A small one will cost $20,000+. That's a bit expensive for a few small food plots, IMHO. A regular grain drill won't penetrate untilled ground and would probably be damaged by such an attempt.
     
  14. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    What John said plus they also pull a lot harder than conventional drills do so you might need more horse power to pull one

    My buddy has a huge John Deere no till drill that will plant soybeans in blacktop

    I saw one do it at a demonstration, but I doubt if they would grow too well

    But his cost over $250,000
     
  15. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Don't know if you plan on hunting over your food plots but corn isn't very hunter friendly to hunt over when left standing. Just say'n.................
     
  16. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    Matt,

    Correct on hunting OVER standing corn. But try hunting IN standing corn...especially on a windy (noisy) day. Bucks will bed down in standing corn on a windy day because they feel secure (don't see many humans hanging out in standing corn) and they know the does won't be far from their favorite food source. If the cornfield has a good water source near, you're in for some real excitement. Beats sitting in a bow stand all day on a windy day. Most exciting bowhunting method ever for me (56 years as a bowhunter). Just ease down one row peeking into other rows as you go. Don't wear dark camo. They'll never know you're there if the wind is right...:)

    Good luck all, huntin' season's just right around the corner !

    milt
     
  17. Kalina

    Kalina TS Member

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    If you have heavy soil in your area you might have problems with no-till causing to much moisture retention. Even if you can fight through the mud and get the plots planted you could get a much lower yield. In lighter ground I have seen good results with beans, but have not had much experience with no-till corn.

    Luke Kalina
     
  18. Remstar311

    Remstar311 Member

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    I have two fields side by side and wide open. I leave the corn standing til goose season. Gives the deer a good place to hide and good crow hunting from standing corn. The field next to it is beans. I always hunt deer in the bean field, even when the corn is cut. They prefer it. Its a mass exodus to the beans from the standing corn about half hour before dark.

    I cut the corn basically for goose hunting.
     
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