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Way O/T gas or electric stove ?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Kolarpole, Sep 22, 2008.

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  1. Kolarpole

    Kolarpole Member

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    ran200.................NOT a good move!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  2. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Had both, not propane but natural gas. Hate electric. Can't cook worth a shit with it. Damn thing keeps cooking when you turn it down. With gas, the effect is immediate.

    Yes, you can learn to compensate, but if you have a choice keep the gas.

    HM
     
  3. j2jake

    j2jake Well-Known Member

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    Gas, can still cook when the power is out. Jake
     
  4. Old Texas Marine

    Old Texas Marine Member

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    Ran200.

    What halfmile says,

    HBT
     
  5. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Gas is cheaper by far to cook with.

    Hauxfan!
     
  6. Big Az Al

    Big Az Al Well-Known Member

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    The only way I would go Electric, is an INDUCTION (?) top, Costs 3 to 4 times what gas or electric stoves cost, only works with IRON (steel?) pots. The DEMO puts a piece of news paper under the pot boils water then has you read the paper, pretty kick ass!

    Even there I would keep my gas stove if I had room!

    Al
     
  7. BrowningGal

    BrowningGal TS Member

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    I haven't ever compared costs, so I can only speak from a usability view point. I've had both, and I will never have an electric stove again. I hate them with a passion.

    When you turn the burner off, you have to remove the pot/pan because the effect is not immediate. When you've got an entire dinner going and the stove top is full, there's no place to put all your pots that need to be removed from the fire. Pain in the butt.

    I also find it very hard to control the heat level. I had a lot of scorched food during the 3-4 years I had to use that stove. I never really did master it. I also had troubles canning on an electric stove. I know that not a lot of people can anymore, but that was an issue for me.

    I also had trouble regulating a low temperature for raising home made bread. Can't really do it well with an electric oven. Pilot light is optimum temperature. I can fake it on my current gas stove (which has electric ignition) by lighting the burner for a few seconds every so often and turning it off, but because that change is not immediate in electric, you often end up with a semi-baked sponge. Not good.

    Plus, as mentioned above, if the electricity goes out, you can't even boil water for a cup of coffee or warm up a can of soup. Fire is a good thing!
     
  8. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    All the Pro's have ranges that are gas cooktops and electric stoves/broilers.

    Curt
     
  9. nspktr1

    nspktr1 TS Member

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    Remodeled the kitchen last year and now have the best of both worlds. Natural gas cooktop with one electric warming burner and dual electric convection ovens. Can't beat gas for stovetop cooking and you can't beat the convection ovens. Turkeys and chickens are a snap in those ovens and the best french bread because of the installed water mist. It's a Viking and if I would have had to have purchased it, I never would have spent the money, but won it in a drawing at local appliance dealer. They're around $6000 to start.
     
  10. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    My wife is a gourmet cook. I do a lot of cooking myself. We have had both and now are limited to a smoothtop electric stove. I go onto the patio and use the propane camp stove a lot because it is simply better heat. Electric stoves wont compare to gas. Watch the food network, all the chefs cook on large gas stoves. put a gas stove in and electric oven with convection roast and bake, now you have it. I do a lot of canning ( peppers, tomato's & salsa) with electric stove top, it takes all day, with my outside gas burner it takes minutes.
     
  11. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Gas; immediate heat and cool - electric; needs lotsa time to get heat or to cool and is, therefore real inconvenient.....breakemall....Bob Dodd
     
  12. Big Az Al

    Big Az Al Well-Known Member

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    I went to Wikipedia to get Imfo On Induction stoves is are the pros from Wikipedia


    An induction cooker uses induction heating for cooking. A conducting pot is placed above an induction coil for the heating process to take place. This type of cooktop does not work with non-conductive cookware such as glass.

    Induction cookers are faster and more energy-efficient than traditional cooktops. Additionally, unlike traditional cooktops, the pot is heated directly to the desired temperature rather than heating the stovetop, making the stovetop much safer from the possibility of injury

    Since heat is being generated from an electric current induced by an electric coil, the range can detect when cookware is removed or its contents boil out by monitoring the voltage drop caused by resistance to the current. This creates possible additional functions, such as keeping a pot at minimal boil or automatically turning off when the cookware is removed.

    This form of flameless cooking has an edge over conventional gas flame and electric cookers as it provides rapid heating, vastly improved thermal efficiency, greater heat consistency, plus the same or greater degree of controllability as gas.[citation needed]

    The amount of time that it takes a pot to boil depends on the power of the induction cooktop. Thus, the time can be from three minutes for 3600 watt induction stove tops, to around ten minutes for 1200 watt ones: much faster than conventional electric coil or radiant cookers.[citation needed] However, boiling water is a process also largely dependent on the amount of water; the speed benefits of induction cooking are most often seeing when stir-frying: a thin pan with 3 tablespoons of oil may heat up to stir-frying temperature in as little as 10 seconds.

    Induction cookers are safer to use than conventional stoves because there are no open flames and the "element" itself reaches only the temperature of the cooking vessel; only the pan becomes hot. However, it must be remembered that pan was at 100 °C (212 °F) and in deep fat frying could be as hot as 200 °C (392 °F). Induction cookers are also easier to clean because the cooking surface is flat and smooth, even though it may have several zones of heating induction. In addition, food cannot burn onto the cooking surface as it is not hot.

    http://video.on.nytimes.com/?fr_story=7774519da0a39617f1601f0614227c90280a07eb,

    the link is to an interview of a cook in her resturaunt, these are great things. I have seen then and an in awe!

    Al
     
  13. Big Az Al

    Big Az Al Well-Known Member

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    Given a choice of traditional electric stove, wich I will not own! gas Is a given!

    Given a choice between Gas and Induction, it would be tuff, Power outages probably tilting me to gas.

    The ability to have gas and An induction top I would take both in a heart beat

    AL
     
  14. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    Kinda hard to heat your house when the electric's out. At least a gas stove will take the chill off. A little harder to accidently burn yourself when you can see the flame(heat).

    Also, where's "Goose2" when we need him. Probably out wineing and dining (lobbying)the moderators.
     
  15. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Browning Gal, you can use your oven for a proof box for your bread dough.

    turn on to warm, or to 150, place a shallow pan of water in the bottom rack (lowest positon), and your bread pans in the upper.

    After a few minutes turn off the oven, your bread should rise nicely.

    I have a link up to show how to do this.

    I got the idea when my daughter told me about a proof box they had where she worked.

    I also use the furnace room, mine has a boiler that's warm on top and the bread dough rises nicely there.

    HM
     
  16. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    I was visiting in Britain earlier this month. Stayed with some relatives that had an AGA gas stove; very trick and impressive; it's gas and is always on. Beats me how to cook on it, but we ate well..
     
  17. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Be careful when using a gas stove for heating, as unacceptable levels of carbon monoxide can build up when the oven door is open. Because modern houses are more airtight, you should NOT use a gas stove for heating a room.

    If you absolutely HAVE to, then make sure you have a carbon monoxide alarm near the stove, and turn on the vent over the stove.

    Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are headaches and nausea.
     
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