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Wads and Horses

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by John Stefanowicz, Sep 28, 2007.

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  1. John Stefanowicz

    John Stefanowicz TS Member

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    Do horses eat plastic wads, and die?
    I want to shoot on my 40 acres. I wouod use a portable trap. But the locations are limited to about 3. I would probably shoot 400 targets per weekend with the winter coming. I'm probably going to make a pile, like at the club(s). But I want to avoid divorce and alimony. There are 8 horses out there, browsing at various locations. No, it would be too costly to shoot a horse. Alimony, you know. But I need confirmatiion from the astute, knowledgable, intelligent, to provide an assurance to my beloved that no harm shall occur.
    I need advice from horse owners and vets, or credible sources. Me myself would like comments for my own amusement. Hay, thanks a lot. John
     
  2. John Stefanowicz

    John Stefanowicz TS Member

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    Sorry. I was misleading. I am NOT going to be making a pile of plastic. It would be obviously spread into northerly directions, and I believe they would travel about 40 yards (or I'm in the position of having to aim my wads as well as my targets, and shot fall. o have a legitimate Missouri mule who picks off the plastic plugs from a tractor battery, if available to him. He also likes to eat filters from cigarets. So there is some basis for mr my question, concern. John
     
  3. Little Dog

    Little Dog TS Member

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    Good luck finding anybody who is astute, knowledgeable, or intelligent- present company excluded.
     
  4. ronbo142

    ronbo142 TS Member

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    Personally I would not shoot clay targets around my horses if you use regular targets the PITCH would make them sick or worse.

    Ronbo
     
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about wads and horses but I do know that clay targets and hogs don't make for a profitable operation. I'm guessing that a horse could pass a wad or two but might plug up on a sack full of them. Any way to shoot in a direction that puts the wads/target debries beyond the fence?
     
  6. Kolar Dan

    Kolar Dan Member

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    A friend of mine has a trap range that we have shoot on for years throwing over the pasture where his horses are kept. I don't know of ever being a problem.
    Sonny
     
  7. Hipshot 3

    Hipshot 3 TS Member

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    I am all those things....Astute,knowledgable, and intelligent! I shall give you my best advice on this matter! Yes, horses love the taste of plastic. When they eat it, they turn into mules. When that happens, they are no longer horses....and mules don't like plastic....Bingo, problem solved.Then you can shoot all you want to! Any other questions?
     
  8. TC

    TC TS Member

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    I have never seen a horses or cattle eat pitch targets. Have thousands of them in the pasture. (targets that is)

    Hogs will eat them like candy. Don't know about bio's. Tony
     
  9. ricks1

    ricks1 TS Member

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    horses dont eat plastic or the targets have 10 in lot and 10,000+ wads no problem cattle dont bother them either rick
     
  10. jakearoo

    jakearoo Active Member

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    Plastic aside, how do you feel about having a whole bunch of lead on your land? Jake
     
  11. Little Dog

    Little Dog TS Member

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    Jake, don't be such a baby. Lead is good for the land- it's natural.
     
  12. The Rock

    The Rock Active Member

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    jakearoo

    I don't think the horses will eat lead either. Now ducks they are stupid enough to eat lead. So unless the the horse plans on flying no problem.

    You don't plan on eating the lead off of the ground either I take it, right?

    Rock

    Jim
     
  13. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Why not simply fence off the fallout area?
     
  14. blizzard

    blizzard Active Member

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    Hey Jake- Are you worried about the lead because your horses lick their hooves, or do you lick your shoes at the end of the day?
     
  15. Hipshot 3

    Hipshot 3 TS Member

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    John......One final thought!......If your horses are Broncos and not Colts, you have no hope of solving your problem!
     
  16. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    I own a boarding and training facility, and I shoot trap. I thought about setting up my own trap, but after talking to the vet and reading some case studies, I decided not to do it.

    Grazing horses will ingest lead shot from the soil surface on a daily basis, particularly where the pasture is grazed closely. Lead compounds can have a sweet taste to horses, and horses have been known to lick old lead-acid batteries because they like it.

    In horses, lead poisoning often results in a chronic weight loss, despondency, weakness, colic, diarrhea, laryngeal or pharyngeal paralysis (roaring), and difficulty in swallowing.

    It all depends on how much shooting you do, how often the horses are put out to pasture, how heavily-grazed the pasture is (if the grass doesn't get short, then the horses won't pick up the pellets with their lips), etc.

    I have heard some people say that soil acidity causes lead to leach into the soil, and then the lead is taken up by the plants growing on that soil (i.e. grasses), but I haven't looked into it to see if it is really a significant problem or not.

    I shoot a lot, and our pasture is heavily-grazed. My situation might be different than yours.
     
  17. nicky

    nicky Member

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    John maybe you can still find the old cardboard wads somewhere ?. I don't know if anyone still makes them or even if you reload just an option. If the lead is a problem load steel shot, all depends on how much your going to shoot, whether or not if it's worth it. , Kevin
     
  18. cdconley

    cdconley TS Member

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    I have a trap range in my back yard along with horses. I've been shooting right over their heads for a few years. To this point they are all still fine, but I can still hope (need to be a long time horse owner to get that one). Also in the Young metropolitan area (you have to have shot in Young to get that one) they have 4 traps they have been shooting on for years over heavy pasture grass. There are always cattle grazing in the wad and shot fall area and I understand they also graze horses there. The ranch owner leases the trap range to the club and I’m sure if wads, pitch and shot were a problem he would have ended that relationship years ago. I’m just hoping that the guys running the shoot don’t make the mistake of using the high acid based bio targets. As I understand it a few years with them and it will be a dirt field not a pasture, then the rancher will have something to say.
     
  19. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    "Do horses eat plastic wads, and die?"
    The way this sentence is punctuated, the clear answer is yes and yes.
    Horses die. And, horses can ingest plastic wads.
    Whether there is any correlation between the two acts is debatable.

    I doubt that the plastic is toxic to living organisms, and the wads are too small to create internal blockages.
    Them's my opinions, anywho.
     
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