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WADS AND FOULING.

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by nsrailroad, Jul 8, 2009.

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  1. nsrailroad

    nsrailroad Member

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    Is their any brand of wads that cause less fouling than others?
    Thanks
    Railroad
     
  2. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    Although I don't have any definitve test data to support this, it SEEMS that I have less crap on my choke tubes now that I'm using Downrange wads.

    When I used Claybuster wads, it seemed worse.

    YMMV
     
  3. mollyone

    mollyone TS Member

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    for me the downrange seems to have less plastic bildup only load 1oz but like them fast 1250-1300
     
  4. nsrailroad

    nsrailroad Member

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    Heard today from one shooter likes downrange.
     
  5. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    My experience with plastic residue in shotgun chokes leads me to believe the choke is at least as much to blame as the material in the wads. In 2003, I bought one of the first KX-5s. The choke tube became coated with plastic using the same factory loads and reloads that did not leave very much plastic in the chokes of my older Kreighoff. I theorized that the tubes were not polished well and set out to replace them at that year's Grand.

    The only choke vendor to ask me why I wanted to replace my chokes was Stu Wright, who defended the quality of Krieghoff chokes and went on to explain to me how chokes are made and how excessive parallel, popular in chokes because it makes the pattern core hotter and results in more smoke when a target is centered, can lead to scrubbing plastic from wads. He sent me to the practice traps to shoot 100 with his tube so we could compare it with the one I had shot 100 shells through that morning with the same loads. The constrictions of the two tubes were within .001" of each other but his tube was almost totally free of plastic while my Krieghoff tube had an obvious coating.

    I'm not saying that a softer wad can't leave more plastic residue behind but if a bore gauge run through your choke reveals a lot of parallel at the muzzle in porportion to the length of the choke, that is more than likely the cause. The longer the parallel section, the shorter and more abrupt the tapered section becomes, which makes the scuffing action on the wad greater.

    Ed
     
  6. skeeljc

    skeeljc Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    Yes, Federal, Winchester, Remington, Gualandi, Downrange, Pattern Control.

    Stay away from Claybuster. They are by far the worst!

    Jim Skeel
     
  7. ou.3200

    ou.3200 Well-Known Member

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    The Duster wads and Downrange wads seem leave very little plastic in the barrel. Claybusters and TGT12s have been the worst for me.
     
  8. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Well, I currently use nothing but TGT-12s and there is very little plastic in my chokes. Also, I used to use a lot of Claybuster CB-4100 Lightning wads and never had a lot of plastic residue. Again, the choke has as much to do with it as anything.

    Ed
     
  9. threedeuces

    threedeuces TS Member

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    claybuster are by far the worst from my experience. I like DR the best.
     
  10. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    What Ed said.

    Also, I routinely hone chokes before I use them, and get almost no fouling from the Claybusters I prefer to use.
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have used Claybuster Wads and have not seen a problem. I agree with Ed, the barrel/choke is the primary cause of plastic build up, not the particular wad that you are using.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Instead of guessing or blaming a wad for something that may not be its fault, mic your chokes and see how much parallel they have. Unless a wad is made of super hard plastic, it's going to leave residue in a choke with a lot of parallel.

    Don't overlook the fact that chokes with short, abrupt tapers are not the kindest to your shot or your patterns, either.

    Ed
     
  13. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I use claybusters exclusively and have moderate build up on my browning invector plus chokes in all configurations and no build up in my tighter fixed choke 1975 vintage Remington 1100. Go figure.
     
  14. midalake

    midalake Well-Known Member

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    Well for those who are quick to say it the tube........I say not all plastics are cerated equal. YES Claybuster is the worst. The best wad for no fouling I have used is Duster. The "newer" style slippery plastic seems to do the best.


    GS
     
  15. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Tripod, measure the parallel in those chokes and I'll bet the amount of parallel in the Browning choke is a higher percentage of the choke's total length than the Remington.

    Ed
     
  16. clb

    clb TS Member

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    Ed, I don't doubt that one manufacturers choke tube can cause more of a plastic buildup than another as proved by you using the same loads and running them out of different choke tubes. But I think what I experienced is much different than your experience.

    As I think you know, I use only Gold Medal components. Many years ago, to save a little money, I switched to Claybuster wads. Everything was fine for quite some time using those wads until I bought another batch. All of a sudden I had so much plastic in my Briley tubes that you could peal the plastic out with a knife blade after only one or two hundred shells. Didn't change anything but substituted back to Federal wads and the plastic buildup was gone. Explain how it could be anything other than the plastic used in the wad? Also years ago, when Federal switched from the ribbed hulls to the smooth hull, I decided to change over to Remington shells so I bought a few flats at the Pa state shoot. Same thing, after about 100 rounds of the NEW shells, the plastic buildup was there. Decided not to use the Remington shells due to the buildup and switched back to Federal. I asked everyone I could find if they had problems with plastic in new Remington shells and they all said no.

    We can all feel the difference in the slipperyness of the Claybuster wads versus the manufacturers wads. I believe under normal circumstances, the Claybuster wads do leave a little bit more plastic but not drastic. I believe that in my case, the manufacturers had a short problem with the plastic used which they eventually corrected. BTW I currently use Downrange wads and they are great!
     
  17. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Any wad that holds shot, and said shot does not impact bird with the result that the bird is broken, is foul.

    Should this occur at a greater rate than normal, it can result in foul language that is inappropriate around women and children.

    Don Verna
     
  18. LDAdd

    LDAdd TS Member

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    For a long time I have been closely observing plastic build-up in my guns with both choke tubes and fixed chokes. Fixed chokes seem to have much less build-up than tubes...I say this without going into brands of tubes involved, etc. For a time I used a large quantity of Remington Fig 8's, along with about the same amount of Claybuster Fig 8 clones (thousands of each, didn't mix them in shooting sessions). My observations indicated no discernable difference of plastic deposits from either of these wads. However, I do believe that weather and ambient temps definately make a difference. I shoot in weather between mid 20's clear up to the one hundred teens at times. It appears to me that warm to hot weather produces more build-up than cooler days, that being the case with either wad. A lot of people are criticizing CB products but that is not my experience. I am currently using both CB and DR wads in the same tubes (Kolar) and the deposits are the same for all practical purposes. I have found that plain old WD40 does a very good job removing these deposits.

    For what it's worth....

    Larry
     
  19. nsrailroad

    nsrailroad Member

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    I think alot how rough the forcing cone area is. This where I get the most build up, Remingtons. I may try some others soon.
    Thanks
    Railroad
     
  20. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    I think most choke tubes are shorter than fixed chokes were, which makes the taper sharper and more abrasive to wads. The new generation of longer choke tubes (Beretta Optima and others) and extended ones like Stu Wright's seem to stay freer of deposits.

    Ed
     
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