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Wad Pressure question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by RobPete, Sep 25, 2009.

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  1. RobPete

    RobPete Member

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    How important is wad pressure? Is there a certain rule of thumb to be applied, or is every wad different?
     
  2. goatskin

    goatskin TS Member

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    The current doxology is that wad pressure went out with high-button shoes and wearing a tie to shoot trap.

    For modern smokeless - it says in the (Modern) 'bible' - all you really need to do with modern wads is set them gently & lightly on top of the powder, and the superior engineering will affect the seal you *need, rather than that you screw things up by strongarming something.

    In reality, with fast powders, say TiteWad to Green Dot, it probably matters not one whit. Herco, 4756, 7625 ... it's probably a good idea to make sure all the air is squoze out.


    Bob
     
  3. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    No wad pressure may be reckless....In a tapered wall hull it takes a little pressure to push the wad down the taper and to displace the air.....It takes a little pressure to just seat it on the powder.....BTW Winchester recommends 30-40# of wad pressure......wad pressure will not hurt anything.....not having any???????
     
  4. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

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    Years ago, when I first started reloading shotshells, all manuals recommended 40 lbs of pressure in seating wads. With modern plastic wads and powders, that is no longer necessary. What is needed is to ensure that the wad is fully seated on top of the powder charge. To ensure that, I set my MEC 9000 wad ram so that it registers just a little movement as it pushes the wad down fully, indicating that the wad is fully seated. This is probably around 10-15 lbs, but the exact pounds are not important-just being sure the wad is fully seated into the hull and on the powder charge is all you need.

    Jim R
     
  5. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    The crimp will give you adequate wad pressure.
     
  6. goose2

    goose2 Well-Known Member

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    Wad pressure is not needed nowaday. Seat the wad as far as you need to get a good crimp.
     
  7. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    Modern shells, modern wads, and for 30 years I've survived well with just having the slightest bit of indication on the loaders pressure guide at the time of seating. I'd wager somewhere around 5; maybe 10 lbs. A little more, maybe up to 20 lbs and the plastic wad will spring back into the original shape - a lot more will only serve to crush the wad.....Bob Dodd
     
  8. powderburn

    powderburn Member

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    Hi
    I agree with the "all you need is the crimp" post. Wad pressure was a must back in the days of ball powders like WW473, WW452, etc. Nowadays, just make sure the wad seats and bottoms out, and then put a good crimp down.
     
  9. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    I use about 38 to 40 pounds of pressure when seating the wad. I do this mainly to make sure the wad is seated firmly against the powder and not hung up on the side of the shell like in a Win AA HS.

    Using 40 pounds of pressure is not going to hurt anything even if the wad is already on top of the powder, but not using enough pressure to seat the wad on the powder MIGHT adversely affect the quality of the load. So, if it doesn't hurt anything to use 40 pounds seating pressure and MIGHT hurt something by not using it, where is the logic in NOT using it?????

    It doesn't cost any more or take any more time to seat the wad with 40 pounds pressure, so I can see no reason NOT to do it.

    Easystreet
     
  10. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    It's probably not all that important to have a certain amount of wad pressure on a plastic wad. I try to make sure my wads are seated on top of the powder charge, I prefer letting the chamber pressure collapse the wad legs than me doing it too. I don't use new type AAs anymore because I don't care for the internal lip that may cock a wads base sideways. They sound awful and take my mind off my shooting for a bit and I certainly don't need much of that kind of help. Hap
     
  11. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    What Hap said.
     
  12. John Thompson

    John Thompson TS Member

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    The recommendations that I had was: with the loader fully up, use a pencil with an eraser, eraser end into the hole under the shell at the wad pressure station and adjust the wad pressure down until you cannot move the hull. This adjustment seats the wad over the powder. Any additional pressure at the crimp will collapse the wad to get a good crimp.
     
  13. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Plastic wads will not hold the pressure applied to them. If you seat a wad with 5 or 40 pounds of pressure, as soon as the handle is raised, the pressure is gone.

    Wad pressure was very important when I loaded a cardboard over powder wad and one thin and one thick felt filler wad. That cardboard and felt would hold wad pressure.

    Pat Ireland
     
  14. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    FWIW...If you carefully cut a window in the side of a factory shell you will find that the powder is compressed.
     
  15. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    "you will find that the powder is compressed."


    And that is precisely why you will never see detonation in a shotshell with shotshell propellants. Another big factor is the fact that the powder is being compressed by a,,plastic,,wad.
     
  16. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    <em>"FACTORY SHELL"</em>

    P: you are wasting your time ....this is way over your head. If you are going to quote me, tell the whole story, quit using only what suits your attempts at backbiting. You need to brush up on your Reading, Retention, Comprehension skills.
     
  17. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    "this is way over your head"

    LOL!!


    You made the bogus statements on another thread, failed to back them up, and now you claim this is way over my head?


    What a joke...


    As I said before, the door is wide open. Either prove your bogus 'detonation' claims, or tape it up!
     
  18. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    HAHA.....p....We have an old family saying......<em>"PISS OFF"</em>......LMAO
     
  19. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Years ago, I had a problem with a loader that drops the shot in the station following the one at which the wad is seated. Hulls were buckling in the crimp die and correctly assuming that my wad and shot column was too high in the hull, I cranked up the old wad pressure. But the condition worsened until I adjusted the wad seating depth just deep enough to be against the powder charge but not compress the wad. When compressed without shot to hold it down, the wad will spring back up - the harder it is compressed, the more "spring" it has. That taught me to seat the wad against the powder and leave it at that.

    Bottom line - a lot of wad pressure is not necessarily better than a little and often is worse. All you are doing by compressing a wad is defeating the shot cushioning and recoil absorbing qualities of the wad's cushion section.

    I have also loaded many flats of shells with no wad pressure when trying a more dense powder than the one I usually use. Those shells fired very normally.

    When comparing factory-loaded shells to your own, you have to remember that the shell makers use their proprietary wads regardless of which powder manufacturer is supplying their current propellant. Accordingly, when cutting open factory loads assembled at different times over a period of years, you'll find wads that are compressed anywhere from a lot to not at all.

    Ed
     
  20. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    That's what I expected.
     
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