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vizula

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by edthearcher, Feb 12, 2008.

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  1. edthearcher

    edthearcher Member

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    vizula any one have one, what do you think of this dog? the reason Iam asking I lost my english pointer last fall great companion. thinking oof replacing her with a vizula. but the problem might be cost they go around here for $700 to $1,ooo. plus Iam retired on a fixed income and thats a big bite. any ideas would be welcome thanks ED
     
  2. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    One of my best friends has 2. Of course he thinks their the greatest dogs on earth. From what I've seen, they are big winded and can run all day, fairly "soft" and very bidable. I don't know how they handle cold weather. There is an inherited trait in the V dog that some bloodlines carry a higher chance of seizures, but I don't know how dominant it is. For some reason, I'm partial to Setters and Drahthaars. To each his own.
     
  3. cementman

    cementman Member

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    Location:
    Milford, Michigan
    Have my Visla going on 13 years now. Went thru Labs and Britteneys, both great dogs but no comparision with my Sadie girl. Yes, she demands attention but gives back 100% in return. Fantasic nose, ranges just about 35 -35 yards out and locks solid on point. Back in my Britteny days, I hunted with a friend who had a Visla and after a all day hunt I was on the porch combing burs out of my dog and he sat drinking a beer after hosing down his dog. This made up my mind at time to consider a Visla in the future and have never looked back. Visla are on the high side to purchase but remember the largest cost in owning a dog is feeding and Vet costs, cheap dog same as an more expensive dog.
     
  4. striper

    striper Member

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    Go with a German Wirehair. Best all around hunter for close in, hardy, great nose and work water and point upland game. I raised them 30 years ago best dogs for all around hunting. JMHO
     
  5. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    Ed, like always make sure your buying hunting stock and view parents prior to paying. With that being stated, I was always a shorthair man and now a wirehair. I have two friends whom both have excellent lineages of Vizsla's.I myself have considered obtaining one at some point. I unlike pointers need people and genrally don't do well kept in a kennel constantly. They're great with kids and are protective of their families. They tend to be short_rangers but as with shorthairs some are becoming wider workers due to trials.

    It sounds as though you have a year or two on me but I like you think that $700 plus is alot of money for a pup. But like everything else its definetly not out_of_reason in pricing. I remember when a darn good pup would fetch $50 and it took devoted hunters to pay that! Now $2000 isn't that unrealistic for certain lineage.
     
  6. ivanhoe

    ivanhoe Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Oxford MA
    Ed and Pat the name of the breed is Vizsla. I have included the website URL for the AKC standard on the breed. Other than that I am not that familiar with the breed.

    Bob Lawless
     
  7. PODO

    PODO TS Member

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    Ed my son in law just lost his vizsla this year - great dog small - good family dog - was almost as good as my German WireHair Pointer - make sure you get one from hunting stock. - TOM
     
  8. SNelson

    SNelson Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    I have a 4 year old male Vizsla or should I say I have the hunting rights to this hunting machine. You see the dog belongs to my daughter and her husband and I get the hunting use of the dog in the fall - I have the best of all worlds. He was bought as a pet and I tried for a couple of years to test his hunting skills and get him into birds. Because I am a poor dog trainer his progress was slow. The more birds he got the better he got and today he is one joy to take hunting. For me, hunt skills or not, the greatest trait of the Vizsla is that they really want to be with you in the field. Even as a youngster when you would take him for a walk in the field he wanted to know where you were. He checks back and stays with you and wants to be with you. I have had Britts, GSP's, English Setters and Pointers over the years and they all have a tendency to go hunt by themselves. I want to hunt birds and not dogs. You don't have this problem with a Vizsla or at least my Vizsla. Hunt wise he is all business with great desire and stamina. He has a good nose and has a solid point. Very intense he will follow the bird from flush and retrive anything that you hit. He is also excellent hunting dead. We hunted 21 days togather this past fall, eleven days on Grouse and Woodcock and ten days on Pheasant. He had well over 150 points and we only lost one Woodcock that he did not point. The breed does demand much attention, they need lots of excercise or they get themselves in trouble. They want to be with you all the time and have been called a velcro dog. I can't say enough good things about my experience with "my" Vizsla. Every day out with him is a true gift. Good luck with your quest for a great hunting partner.
    Scott R Nelson
     
  9. h92064

    h92064 Active Member

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    Ed - consider this. Get online and look up the regional Vizsla Rescue Organization near you. Considering your fixed retirement income, this might offer the best option for you. My sister in Idaho has been very active in the Western United States with the Vizsla Rescue Groups - there are numerous options to "adopt" a Vizsla at a significantly lower cost than buying from a breeder. By the way - Vizsla's are fantastic dogs.

    Just a thought - good luck!
     
  10. h92064

    h92064 Active Member

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    Get over it.......

    If it important to "anyone" - here is the proper spelling.....

    "Vizsla"
    (Hungarian Short-haired Pointing Dog) (Rövidszörü Magyar Vizsla)
     
  11. coyote268

    coyote268 TS Member

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    In my younger days I belonged to the Northern California Field Trial gunners association. I mostly gunned over Shorthairs and Whirehairs and loved both breeds with the Shorthair taking the edge. I did have the opportunity to gun over Visla's somewhat as they wern't that many around then. The thing that impressed me was they had a pretty calm attitude, and were very well mannered. Hunted and pointed well and were very good honoring other dogs points. They wern't the speed demon like the Shorthairs but more of a methodical hunter. Their owners said they were excellent dogs around the house. I do think the price you quoted is excessive but here again I have no idea what they bring these days. Anyway, don't forget the Biscuit Eater was just a stray a young man picked up although not a Visla.
    Dan
     
  12. dsm80

    dsm80 TS Member

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    I have owned vizslas for the last 22 years. All were hunting dogs. All were inside dogs. They are very trainable and bidable. They are great family dogs and good with children. The are as all bird dogs are variable in their ability to hunt. I will say that they are strong dogs and can be hyper or very sedate. All I have owned will hunt and retrieve. As for their noses I have had great results with mine. They are very loving and need a lot of running and close affection. They will hunt dead better than any dog I have seen or hunted with.
    They are easy to train and do not tend to run off like the english and german pointers. They do not have the stamina of the german pointers. They are best in heavy cover on quail and pheasant. You must give them a lot of time and you need to be able to be strong enough to handle them.

    They can read your mind. Good luck.

    david muff
     
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