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VISION what effects yours!

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by gun fitter, May 16, 2009.

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  1. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Since vision is the most important part of shooting clay targets.

    I'm interested in hearing what you find effects yours. Diet, Hydration, Rest, Bright Days, Dark days...

    Did taking vitamins help you, How did a night out drinking effect your vision?


    Joe
     
  2. Andy44

    Andy44 Active Member

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    WHAT???? Now we have to SEE them? Oh, CRAP! Now I'm really screwed!

    Seriously, I do better when I'm slightly hungry, NOT hung-over, and when I haven't shot Trap for a while. Being relaxed and able to FOCUS on a moving clay is critical to my shooting, so having a "balanced" system is important to me.

    AndyH ;-)
     
  3. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure that devil rum ruined my vision at times.

    But on the other hand, maybe it improved it somewhat.........as I do remember that the "girls" all looked better at closing time.......lol

    Hauxfan!
     
  4. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    I can tell you what helped mine... I was in a mid yardage shoot off back in 88 that I recall well. At the Wisconsin State shoot. Likely I had broken about 95 or so and was shooting off from the 24 or so. Typically, shoot-offs happen later in the day and I was tired. And as it so happened that day, my floaters emerged from hiding and clouded my view in my dominant eye. Yes, I could swish them back and forth and in the end I tried to do a swish and then shoot quickly before they got into my direct obstruction of my dominant eye. I broke a target or two and then got behind to stay. It was not pretty and my friends wondered why I sped up... Floaters still happen occasionally, but now I employ "quiet-eye". I stand at ready with gun down and broken open and watch out over the house... Adn then when my eyes clear, and/or they have stopped twitching, I set the trigger, mount th gun and shoot the target. If no other mental thought gets in my way the bird is broken hard. So, I wait when it is my turn till this phenomena becomes readily apparent and then I shoot. Usually, I can get this to happen in normal timing sequences and there is no hesitation when it comes time for me to shoot.
     
  5. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Being slightly hungry works for me, too. But since I developed PVD (a peeling of the lining of the eyeball) in my right eye, anything I look at one-eyed is cloudy and sometimes is not where I thought it was. Targets often "move" a foot or so in anydirection when recoil moves my head.

    I probably should convert to left-handed but all my long guns are right-handed and at age 62, I'm rather fight than switch!

    Ed
     
  6. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    I was not referring to those who have developed diseases of the eye. Can't help with them. Must refer to a doctor I'm not licensed to practice any medicine in the United States.

    I do find that a finger poked in the eye or tape on it is particularly uncomfortable but thats just me.

    Joe
     
  7. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure about your disclaimer, but, as a diabetic, I find slightly hungry keeps my blood sugar down and least affects my vision during shooting...
     
  8. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    dehydration. I try to drink a lot of water a few hours before I shoot.
     
  9. Dahaub

    Dahaub Active Member

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    In my case I have very heavily hooded eyelids. If in the later part of the day and it's been hot the sweat that gets in my eyes really stings. More so than the days where it's hot and in the am. I try to keep a hand towel from a ribs place handy to wipe my eye lids off so they don't drip into the eye. Dan
     
  10. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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  11. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Some Lanny Bassham Stuff on "quiet eye phenomona
     
  12. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    And another previous supplied by Terry Jordan.

    From: t jordan
    Email:
    Date: Sun, Apr 05, 2009 - 02:49 PM ET
    Website Address:


    This was posted on trapshooters.com it is very important, keep it on file and read it regularly.

    Terry.

    The Quiet Eye Phenomenon

    March 2006—Trapshooting Olympic Way 306 sidebar

    Dr. Joan Vickers, professor and director in kinesiology at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, has been a pioneer in the identification, study and measurement of the Quiet Eye phenomenon in sports performance. The following material is a combination of direct excerpts from Dr. Vickers’ excellent article, “A Quiet Eye” [Golf Digest, January 2004] and additional text inserted by me to illustrate how her findings while studying golfers’ putting techniques can be applied to trapshooting.—Les Greevy

    Why is it that shooting consistently high scores is so difficult for so many shooters? Almost anyone can learn to mount the gun and determine the lead in an acceptable manner. The difficulty lies in using your eyes to detect the right information about distance, speed and direction at the right time, then using your mind to relay that information to consistently make the shotstring and target collide.

    By recording data under laboratory conditions (using sophisticated eye-movement tracker technology, which allows us to monitor precisely what the eye focuses on and for how long) the mystery of what separates really good competitors from the rest is beginning to be figured out. We call it the Quiet Eye; here’s what it is and how you develop it.

    The Quiet Eye occurs when your gaze remains absolutely still at the target pick-up point just before and as the target is called for and the gun move is initiated. There are two important aspects of this basic yet essential skill: location and duration.

    Concerning location, the shooter must determine his target pick-up point (look point) with precision. It must be on the line of the target, and the look point must be identified with a very small feature in the background of the scene.

    Quiet Eye duration is also important. The expert shooters have a Quiet Eye duration of 2+ seconds on average, while less skilled shooters hold the gaze for less than one second.

    The same results have been found in a number of other sports, including rifle shooting, darts, billiards and basketball free throws. In all of the self-initiated target sports, the Quiet Eye is emerging as the primary indicator of optimal focus and concentration.

    This QE period is essential because your hands are controlled by your brain. The brain gets valuable information from your eyes. As you shoot, your brain needs to organize more than 100 billion neuron networks that are informed by your gaze and then control your hands, arms and body as the shot is performed. These networks will stay organized for only a short period of time; a window of opportunity opens that must be used when it is at its most optimal. This is the QE period.

    The notion of being in The Zone or of “flow” in sport has been around for a long time. Until now, there has been only unscientific evidence that The Zone exists, let alone has measurable characteristics. Perhaps the Quiet Eye will emerge as one of objective measures.

    The Quiet Eye is the glue that keeps neurons from being scrambled when under stress. It supplies the right information at the right time. Overall, the Quiet Eye has the essence of simplicity alluded to when the shooter is in The Zone. More research will tell. In the meantime, QE is something you can learn and add to your game today.
     
  13. BrowningGal

    BrowningGal TS Member

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    Allergies seem to be a problem for me lately, and no pill the doctor gives me seems to help. Mornings are the worst for my eyes. Lots of watering. When I'm shooting, I try to make sure I'm up for at least two to three hours before I have to shoot so that my eyes have time to settle down. I also try not to be one of the first squads out.
     
  14. jim nikson

    jim nikson TS Member

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  15. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    MIA, Thank you This is nothing new and holding ones Focus is the starting point for all shotgunners. I tend to disagree about the duration for it talke much less tim from mount to call than two seconds for the top allamericans that come to mind.
    Do you know was the Quiet eye testing done on trap shooters or some other claytarget shooter?

    Joe
     
  16. Mismost

    Mismost TS Member

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    My eyes are light sensitive, so I try to use a dark lens to keep from squinting, yet keep it as light as I can stand. I also can't just switch lenses, it seems to take 20-30 minutes for my eyes to adjust to the new color....so that means get those glasses on well before shooting to get used to their effects.

    Summer in Texas is brutal, you have to stay hydrated...if you ever get thirsty, you are already behind and headed to dehydration...you can't catch up. The eyes seem to suffer the most and are the first thing to go. Lots of water, before, during, and after...I wear a sweat band and clean my glasses often...eat bananas like they are candy.

    I too shoot better hungry, a big meal (we feed good at our club)before I shoot will slow me down. However, too hungry is just as bad. I carry a couple of baggies with 2 slices of whole wheat bread and eat that about 20 minutes before I shoot...it just seems to be enough to get me through. Again, when my energy level falls, it seems the eyes are the first thing to go.

    About a month ago I started doing eye exercises...that has been a real eye opener! Speaking of opening your eyes, some of the best advice I ever got was BIG EYES...simply open your eyes wide as you mount the gun. We often get so serious and concentrate so hard when we shoot that we start squinting and that narrows our field of vision...so use the BIG EYES and quiet eyes. The actual exercises, while simple, are really making a huge difference in how well I see the targets! They come into a hard focus MUCH faster, so I can actually shoot quicker...if I have the gun in the right place....seems now my eyes are a little quicker than my hands. There are 6 little muscles that move the eyeball and they can get stronger through exercise. If they are stronger, they work better, and you will see better.

    Rule one in shotgunning is Eye on the Target. I am coming to believe that starts a long time before you step up to the line and homework can only help!
     
  17. otnot

    otnot Active Member

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    High blood pressure affects my vision and now that I have it under control my scores have went back up.
     
  18. j2jake

    j2jake Well-Known Member

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    Cialis, it affects my color perception and mental attitude. It also affects my memory, sometimes it make me think I'm in my 30s again. Hope this helps, Jake
     
  19. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Actually my issue was covered in two other threads...something to do with Ugly Women and Ugly men...me and ugly don't get along...thats why there are no mirrors in my house
     
  20. guido

    guido Member

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    That baeutiful gal next to me.

    GUIDO
     
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