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Vietnam how to thank you guys

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by shadow, Feb 28, 2009.

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  1. shadow

    shadow Active Member

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    You are welcome, Copper. As are the vast majority of true Americans. Those that lined up at the airport to yell, spit and throw paper bags of feces at us can take a flying kiss at my butt.
     
  2. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    .It cannot be done by any individual: only by our government. If we can achieve the mission objectives in both Iraq and Afghanistan it will finally be a vindication for those who believe it is right to stand up and fight for the rights of others. When the public elects a government that will do the right thing and stay the course instead of bowing to the changes of public sentiment. Then and only then will the sacrifices of both the Korean and Vietnam Veterans be truly vindicated
     
  3. Old Texas Marine

    Old Texas Marine Member

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    The mood of the public has really changed from the sixties. I was in Wally World Friday with one of my many USMC marked "gimme hats" on when a young man stopped and saluted me. That hasn't happened since 9-1-69 when I stopped wearing a uniform for a living.

    It was nice to be recognized for my patriotism instead of being despised and shunned for it.

    My thanks go to our current military and Presidents Bush (both) who allowed the military to do their jobs so brilliantly in the two recent fights in the Middle East without micro-managing the effort like the GREAT ASSHOLE of the world LBJ and his pompous, arrogant minions who ran our war from the White House.Semper fi,

    HBT
     
  4. K4AA

    K4AA TS Member

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    Unfortunately, the stain of Kissinger and Nixon negotiating and surrendering to the North Vietnamese can never be erased. Public pressure even on a conservative President won out. The military won almost all battles and with proper leadership could have easily won the war. Great credit goes to all the GI's who fought and gave up their lives to defend the US flag. It is hard to thank the dead but anytime you run across a Vietnam vet let them know you appreciate what they did and stood up for. Let us not make the same mistake in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sadly, the office of the President of the US and Commander in Chief is now vacant.
     
  5. ks5shooter

    ks5shooter Member

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    I thank all veterans every day.The American flag and the POW-MIA flag fly daily in front of my home.thanks again to all veterans.....Don:proud son of Donald Biddulph Sr (deceased) U.S.Navy Korean War Veteran C-V 36 USS Antietem
     
  6. Mike

    Mike Member

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    Copper, Thank You, Mik, VN 70-71
     
  7. jimrich60

    jimrich60 Member

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    While many felt a lot of bitterness at the time, for most of us, the anger, divisiveness and issues of Vietnam are long past. Still, it is nice to see that many younger folks are beginning to recognize that we were not "baby killers" or "mercenaries" but simply soldiers, sailors and airmen trying to do our duty, obey our leaders, and serve our country as best we could. So thank you for your thanks. I only wish those many comrades who never came home could have heard such thanks.

    Major, USAF, Retired
     
  8. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Well, I think they did a heck of a job and I sure appreciate it. Many of those guys got picked out of their lives at a prime time, while others were working on liberal arts degrees and/or heading for Canada.
     
  9. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    COPPER: When I came back from the "Nam" I was pissed that I didn't get the thank you that I thought I deserved from the American people. And I still am. However, just to have one person say thanks means a lot to me. You did the right thing, and your welcome, my friend.
     
  10. ismah

    ismah Member

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    Not all veterans are heerows. To some it was a miserable waste of their time. Some celebrate their ETS as a holiday, to live out your life thinking the military was your 'Glory Days' is stupid. Most of you thought about it just as I did. Six years of your life was taken from you by the Big Businesses that wanted the VN war. It's time to move on. You don't need a "Thank You" from anybody.
     
  11. MX-15L

    MX-15L TS Member

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    Thank you Copper. I too, experienced taunting, hateful stares, and snidley remarks when I arrived from my tour. I believe the guys returning in field gear had it worse than I did, I at least had dress greens, but that didn't help much. I don't talk to much about "how I spent my summer vacation", but some memories never go away. Many years after coming home, getting married and having a great daughter, she asked me about my time over seas. I just told her a few things, and she never asked again. About three (3) months later, out of the blue, she wanted to take me to a new War Memorial that was constructed at our lake front. After walking around it for awhile, she called me over to see something in the ground. There were bricks that made up the walking area of the Memorial. She pointed to one of them, and a tears came to my eyes. There in the ground was a brick that said Joseph Zukowski SGT 1966-1968. That was the BEST Welcome home that I could have asked for. Thank you Katie.

    JoeZ
     
  12. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    While I don't often think about it anymore, and while I am glad to see modern commercials like the one where the people in the airport stand and applaud returning soldiers....I don't think I will ever forget being cursed at, spit upon, and beig held generally in contemp by a large portion of the USA population.

    I am glad that the guys and gals of today do not have to go through that...I do appreciate Copper's offer of gratitude....but although the scars are old, the damage is done.

    My consolation then, as now, is that I did not join the military (USAF in my case) based on the decision of others. I did, and still do, consider it a profession imbued with a higher calling that self-interest and it was that call I answered.
     
  13. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    All vets deserve our thanks and our respect. You all have my gratitude and respect, THANK YOU ALL
     
  14. chipking

    chipking TS Member

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    NO ismah most of us did not think of our time in service as you claim to have and very few of us call ourselves heros. And a THANK YOU is most welcome. You and people like you still make me want to puke.

    --- Chip King ---
     
  15. ismah

    ismah Member

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    VERN: BOO HOO HOO
    Remf all the way
     
  16. K4AA

    K4AA TS Member

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    ISMAH: A copy of your DD214 please before you pontificate. If you were there it is very sad that you feel this way. It is an insult to those who died not thinking it was a waste of time. I was an USAF engineering officer. I never fired a gun nor did anyone fire at me. At Tan Son Nhut AB I used to stand glassy eyed looking at the caskets stacked up six high waiting for their trip home. And when those caskets arrived at Travis AFB, pukes were waiting along the exit road to jeer and curse them. Waste of time???
     
  17. WesleyB

    WesleyB Well-Known Member

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    I want to say a big THANK YOU for those that have served and serving now in the forces. Thank you for my protection!! God Bless ya.!!
     
  18. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Ismud: What a PUKE, Where did you spend your time, chasing whores and smoking dope? In the rear with the gear, were you, PUKE? The only Hero's are dead, and on the wall.
     
  19. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    A short piece from Lauren Zanolli for the History News Network. The cease fire that was negotiated by Kissinger was the direct result of the Nixon Administration being told by Democrat Congressional leaders that they were going to cut war funding. It was Nixon/Kissinger trying to get the best deal with no chips left on their side of the table.


    "What happened when Democrats in Congress cut off funding for the Vietnam War?

    Historians have directly attributed the fall of Saigon in 1975 to the cessation of American aid. Without the necessary funds, South Vietnam found it logistically and financially impossible to defeat the North Vietnamese army. Moreover, the withdrawal of aid encouraged North Vietnam to begin an effective military offensive against South Vietnam. Given the monetary and military investment in Vietnam, former Assistant Secretary of State Richard Armitage compared the American withdrawal to “a pregnant lady, abandoned by her lover to face her fate.” 2 Historian Lewis Fanning went so far as to say that “it was not the Hanoi communists who won the war, but rather the American Congress that lost it.” 3

    In January of 1973, President Richard Nixon approved the Paris Peace Accords negotiated by Henry Kissinger, which implemented an immediate cease-fire in Vietnam and called for the complete withdrawal of American troops within sixty days. Two months later, Nixon met with South Vietnamese President Thieu and secretly promised him a “severe retaliation” against North Vietnam should they break the cease-fire. Around the same time, Congress began to express outrage at the secret illegal bombings of Cambodia carried out at Nixon’s behest. Accordingly, on June 19, 1973 Congress passed the Case-Church Amendment, which called for a halt to all military activities in Southeast Asia by August 15, thereby ending twelve years of direct U.S. military involvement in the region.

    In the fall of 1974, Nixon resigned under the pressure of the Watergate scandal and was succeeded by Gerald Ford. Congress cut funding to South Vietnam for the upcoming fiscal year from a proposed 1.26 billion to 700 million dollars. These two events prompted Hanoi to make an all-out effort to conquer the South. As the North Vietnamese Communist Party Secretary Le Duan observed in December 1974: “The Americans have withdrawn…this is what marks the opportune moment.” 4

    The NVA drew up a two-year plan for the “liberation” of South Vietnam. Owing to South Vietnam’s weakened state, this would only take fifty-five days. The drastic reduction of American aid to South Vietnam caused a sharp decline in morale, as well as an increase in governmental corruption and a crackdown on domestic political dissent. The South Vietnamese army was severely under-funded, greatly outnumbered, and lacked the support of the American allies with whom they were accustomed to fighting.

    The NVA began its final assault in March of 1975 in the Central Highlands. Ban Me Thout, a strategically important hamlet, quickly fell to North Vietnam. On March 13, a panicked Thieu called for the retreat of his troops, surrendering Pleiku and Kontum to the NVA. Thieu angrily blamed the US for his decision, saying, “If [the U.S.] grant full aid we will hold the whole country, but if they only give half of it, we will only hold half of the country.”5 His decision to retreat increased internal opposition toward him and spurred a chaotic mass exodus of civilians and soldiers that clogged the dilapidated roads to the coast. So many refugees died along the way that the migration along Highway 7B was alternatively described by journalists as the “convoy of tears” and the “convoy of death.” 6 On April 21, President Thieu resigned in a bitter televised speech in which he strongly denounced the United States. Sensing that South Vietnam was on the verge of collapse, the NVA accelerated its attack and reached Saigon on April 23. On the same day, President Ford announced to cheerful students at Tulane University that as far as America was concerned, “the war was over.” The war officially concluded on April 30, as Saigon fell to North Vietnam and the last American personnel were evacuated."
     
  20. ismah

    ismah Member

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    K4AA: I saw them at Travis, I also saw them at Oakland. I even followed one home. The pukes weren't allowed near them. But you see, I got over it and to me to dwell on it at this time in life is wasted energy. We're all here only once and each day should be a gift.
     
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