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Vic Reinders and his Remington M31, any Stories?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Perazzi_MX8, Oct 22, 2012.

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  1. Perazzi_MX8

    Perazzi_MX8 Well-Known Member

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    Who has a story about one of Trap's true legends? I met him as a young man at the Wisconsin State Shoot and shook his hand. He was like meeting Vince Lombardi and Bart Starr for me. I still admire this man.


    Duane Nicholson
     
  2. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    Yeah. The only time I ever had a conversation with the man, we were sitting on a bench in front of the Past Presidents' locker room at the Grand in the middle 70's. Back then, they would call your name on the loud speaker if you weren't at your starting trap on time.

    Ol' Vic heard one of those announcements and said to me, "I can't understand people that can't keep track of when they're suppose to shoot."

    The next announcement was,........you guessed it........"Vic Reinders, please report to your starting trap. Vic Reinders, please to your starting trap." He gave me a sort of sick look and slunk off with that M31.
     
  3. Scott Johnson

    Scott Johnson Well-Known Member

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    Here is a blip off the ATA Hall of Fame, so us shooters that are too young to know have an idea who Vic was. Scott

    Vic Reinders, who won the Clay Target Championship with a lone 200 straight in 1958 when he was president of the ATA, is so associated with the growth of trapshooting in Wisconsin that shooters will be surprised to find he was born on a farm in Iowa. The year was 1906, and 29 years later he was receiving a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, where he had been teaching chemistry for five years and from which he retired in 1972.

    Vic Reinders has the distinction of being on more All-America teams than any other shooter in history, and he set a record for the highest average on 100,000 registered 16-yard targets—.98056—which stood from 1961 to 1974. Vic’s lifetime average remained above the 98% mark until he passed the 140,000 registered target plateau.
     
  4. gunut54

    gunut54 TS Member

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    Stopped at the Waukesha Gun Club years ago to get ready for hunting season........found out that back then you needed to be a member in order to shoot there....and that you needed a sponsor....well I did not know any of the members so no way to get a sponsor... but an older gentleman doing some paperwork behind the counter came over and asked what the problem was....I explained the delema...He introduced himself and asked my name....I told him and he shook my hand said glad to meet you..said now I know you and signed as my sponsor....
     
  5. 320090T

    320090T Well-Known Member

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    He shot doubles with that 31 too. Don't know if he did it all the time but I saw him do it once, really good at it.
     
  6. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I had Vic on a Registered Skeet squad, shooting the same gun. He was well along in years by that time but quite amazing, think of it - A pump gun. A release trigger. A full choke.

    If it was me I would have stayed home and waited for a trap shoot. Man, that geezer smoked 'em. Not a winning score, but he broke enough targets to amaze us all.

    "Pull!", Click, Bang, Shuck, Click, Bang...............Dead pair. (Inkballs)l

    Smoke should be along with a few Vic tales.

    HM
     
  7. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Member

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    I started shooting in 1972 at the Waukesha Gun Club. At first I shot skeet and wound up on Vic's league team. To say I learned alot about skeet from him is an understatement. Vic was always willing to help teach anyone who asked, and was very generous with his time.

    He won the state 16 yd from 1938-1942, 1946-1949,1952-1953, and 1957-1959 for a total of 14 times. He only won the handicap once in 1942, but in doubles he won 14 times all shot with the same model 31 with part of the rib missing! He also won the high all around 15 times.

    He always carried 3X5 cards on which he kept his records and jokes to tell. He also ways known to keep a feather from all the game birds he shot. They sat his attic was loaded with them.

    He felt his greatest accomplishment was writing the ATA rule book.

    I'm sure Senior Smoke will be commenting soon with hsi humorous stories Vic.

    Rick
     
  8. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Let me first say that Vic was a personal friend of mine. A few things that you need to know is that Vic ran the Waukesha gun club like the old western hanging judge, judge Roy Bean. Members of the Waukesha gun club can attest that it was Vic's way or the highway at the club.

    The first day I joined the Waukesha gun club, I asked the manager if we could have orange soda placed in the coke machine as all they had was coke. He said I would need to speak to Vic Reinder's about that, as Vic just happened to walk into the club.

    I Introduced my self and we shook hands. I asked him if we could get orange soda placed in the soda machine and Vic pointed his finger at me and said "if you don't like it here, join Boxhorns" as he then walked away. The next saturday, I notice the machine had root beer soda in it. I asked the manager how come we now have root beer in the machine? He said "that's Vic's favorite".

    Despite our first encounter we became good friends over the years. Vic could be gruff, but he also had a heart of gold if he liked you, which few people ever actually saw. He was a stickler for rules, as any member of the club would attest to that.
    When he was a chemistry professor at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee campus during the late 60's, college students were protesting at the school. One day while he was teaching a class, a group of students walked into his classroom and started yelling and wipped his chemnistry equations off the chalk board and ran out of the class.

    The next day Vic brought two rolls of quarters to school, held them in each hand making a fist in each, just in case they came back again, as Vic was going to show them what can happen when you act the way they did the previous day. Luckily, they never returned to his class.

    We were shooting a couple rounds of skeet on an October Sunday morning and the Vicster, the name I usually called him, was not hitting the targets well at all. I asked him what was wrong and he said he loaded up some skeet shells with split peas, trying to find a cheaper alternative than using lead. He said the peas were not heavy enough. Shot was $8.00 a bag at the time and he told me if lead ever went to $10.00 a bag, he thought there would be a mass exodus from the shooting sports as most people could not afford to pay those prices.

    Vic often gave me free lessons in trap and skeet to no avail. I frustrated him to no end as he said I was unteachable, and he was right. Vic gave me some tips on shooting better scores. One tip was that if you are feeling nervous during a shoot, don't look at the other shooters targets, just put your head down and pick a spot on the ground and stare at it, and say the word no, no, no, over and over again, until you hear the man to your left closing his gun and then get ready to shoot. He said by saying the word no over and over again, you just can't think of anything else.

    Vic shot all events with his 31 TC pump, and one day I asked him if I could place a gauge down the barrel and he said fine that no one ever did that to his gun before. His barrel was 28 inches long, full choke at .045 thousands choke. He had a bulge in his barrel which he thinks he got one day when a wad stuck inside his barrel.

    One time at the Grand in Ohio we were walking the main walkway and people kept on asking him for his autograph. Vic hated doing this as he told me "I wish these people would be more concerned about shooting, than me". Vic's 31 had a broken foream and when someone would take his picture he would use his hand to cover up the missing wood. At that same grand, a man had a 31TC foerarm for sale, asking $40.00. I told the man it was for Vic Reinders and he sold it to me for $20.00. I walked up to Vic and gave it to him and he asked why do I need a new forearm? I said because your forearm is broken. He said it doesn't affect the way the gun shoots, take it back and get your money.

    Vic always tried to keep the cost of shooting down especially for the average working man as he thought they were the back bone of our sport. When Vic would go to a shoot he never worried about the guy with a spanking new gun, with gold enlays, as he thought the guy did not have it long enough to really know where the gun shot. He worried about the man with a work worn model 12, 31, or 870 with the bluing off and maybe throw in a bit of rust as he felt those were the shooters to watch out for, as they had the gun long enough and could probably shoot it well.

    One cold winter day, Vic and I shot a Sunday 50 target 16 yard event. He had a score of 12, and 13. His legs were cramping up on him so bad that we had to carry him back into the club house. As we were carrying Vic a potato fell out of his jacket as he would bake a potato and stick it in his pocket to keep him warm. After he was done shooting he would often eat the same potato.

    After we got Vic into the club house a few guys thought Vic was washed up in shooting after the posting of his scores that day. The next sunday in a blistery cold win, Vic shot a 50 straight and the closest nearest score to his was a 47. If he shot a poor score, he never blamed it on his gun, the blame was placed at his door step where it should be.

    I could go on and on about stories about Vic but this is my last one. One day, Vic signed up to shoot the handicap at our state shoot. He was at 25 yards at the time. He was getting older, didn't get around as fast as he use to. Four shooters were waiting for him to shoot the handicap as he always wanted position #5, so he could see 5 targets before he actually started shooting. These guys looked irratated that it took Vic so long to walk up to the trap to start shooting. Vic hobbled right up to them and said" if you don't want to wait, don't sign up with a cripple". By the way Vic waxed their a-- in the handicap that day.

    When Vic passed away, the shooting sports lost someone who gave his adult life to the game. He loved the ATA and most of it's shooters. Next time you go to the ATA hall of fame, read up about Vic and his competitors as these men and women helped shape the ATA and we all owe these men and women a our deepest gradtitude.
    Steve Balistreri
     
  9. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Steve for a very nice writeup.
     
  10. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    I have a couple of "Vic" stories. I probably have told them before, but since this is a dedicated to Vic thread, I'll relate them again.

    The very first Iowa State Shoot I went to must have been the early 70s.

    Back then I shot doubles, something I don't do anymore.

    I had me an over under like most shooters used.

    Here comes this old man walking up with some kind of Remington pump gun.

    I thought to myself, what the hell is this old man going to do with that old pump gun. You have to remember, I had no idea who this old man was.

    Well, he showed me he knew how to shoot. I believe he had a 97 that day and won out of state honors.

    Second story.

    We're at the Grand. I am with another Iowan, and I can't remember his name right now. But his first name was Jerry and he was one funny dude. He kept us in stitches all the time.

    We were on one of the wagons and Vic got on. Jerry says, watch this.

    So he says to Vic, is that a new gun or did you just put some new tape on it.

    Vic just looked at him and didn't bother to answer.

    We thought it was funny as hell, as he did use tape on his Model 31.

    One hell of a shooter. I can attest to that.

    Hauxfan!
     
  11. Perazzi_MX8

    Perazzi_MX8 Well-Known Member

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    Thank You Steve, for the great insight into Vic's personality. If you think of more, please write again on the thread. We couldn't have too many as I see it. I saw him busy as a bee, at every State shoot each year, doing everything he could to make it run smooth. I lived in Racine back then, so I didn't shoot there often. I still miss the Brats & Corn on the Cob, right off the grill. The man with a pump shooting his reloads sure left a great mark on our sport.


    Duane Nicholson
     
  12. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    The first year that I attended the Waukesha gun club annual meeting, Vic was standing at the podium answering questions. Some new member who did not know Vic raised his hand and stood up and asked Vic if we could discuss the possibility of installing a new skeet field? Vic answered abruptly, no, next question.

    Vic did not want lights to be installed at the gun club. Some of the people on the board of directors knew there would be no way in he--, that Vic would allow them to install lights for night shooting. So when Vic left to go on vacation to shoot in New Zealand they installed the lights.

    When Vic came back, all he-- broke loose, as he even called the city telling them the lights were blinding the drivers on the highway and he wanted the electrity cut off.

    Vic said that Remington asked him to be a pro for them at one time. His job would be traveling to shoots, cashering them, and have him shoot exhibitions. Vic turned them down as he wanted to shoot competitively.

    As a school teacher Vic made roughly $3,000.00 a year when he first started out. One day, a solid A shooter with deep pockets put out a challenge to any member in the ATA that they come to his neck of the woods, shoot 1,000 targets and winner take all.

    Each shooter would have to put in $1,000.00 in the kitty. Vic took 1/3 of his teaching salary and entered the competition along with another all American shooter as his name escapes me at this time.

    After the first day Vic had a 3 target lead, after the 2nd day, Vic's lead was cut to 2 target. on the third and final day Vic won it all by 1 target. Vic told me he brought $1,000.00 plus his train ticket to the shoot, along with a big bag of food, and if he had lost he had no idea how he would get back home.

    He told me that losing this particular shoot was not an option. Vic competed in shoots through out the world as he traveled to shoots by car, train, bus, boat, and later in life by plane. How many shooters today would risk 1/3 of their yearly salary to shoot in a match?

    Vic purchased his 31TC from a Remington pro at the old Milwaukee gun club. He paid $50.00 at the time. The very first time that he gave me a shooting lesson he said " purchase a Remington 870 TB, marry the gun like you would marry your wife. Don't let anyone talk you out of getting rid of it. Save the money that you would have spent trading it on another gun, and use that money to shoot".

    Sorry to say I did not listen to old Vic as he was correct. The two best shooters that he ever saw were two farmers from Iowa, a father and his son. The father's name was Arlo Hoan, and I forgot his son's name. He said they both shot Winchester 1897's that they left in the barn and they were rusted but still functioned. Vic said if these two individuals ever shot in the ATA they could have been two of the best all Americans people ever saw. Vic begged them to join and shoot in the ATA and they said all they wanted to do was shoot birds and hunt.

    Steve Balistreri
     
  13. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Member

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    Vick told me about traveling by train to a shoot out west with Arnold Rieger and that Arnold seemed deep in thought. Vic asked him if everything was ok and Arnold said he was wondering why it took longer to go through some states than others. Vic said Arnold thought all the states were the same size and square.

    Hard to beat someone who thinks like that,
    Rick
     
  14. 4painter

    4painter Member

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    I wonder what these guys would be shooting today if they were in their prime, vic and arnold, or the gun they chose to shoot.
     
  15. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    They would be shooting the same guns. One time Dick Bennett the past owner of the Boxhorn gun club said to Vic " just imagine as good as you are how much better you would have been in doubles if you would have used an over and under instead of a pump gun"? Vic went nuts after hearing that and told Dick he would have not shot any better.

    Years ago, some members of the Waukesha gun club chiped in and purchased an over and under for Vic. Vic tried the gun and could not hit anything with it. Shortly afterwards, they asked Vic were was the o/u they purchased for him? He traded it in on a Remington typewriter.
    Steve
     
  16. Joe Woods

    Joe Woods Well-Known Member

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    Sitting with Vic at Grand in the 70's , He reloaded a lot. He kept track of rounds by keeping track of his 209 purchases. Recorded and kept in his back pocket. Wire coiled note pad. the rib on the 31 was missing some rib near the chamber.

    Joe Woods/Ontario
     
  17. willsweptline

    willsweptline Member

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    Found this in the June 1966 issue of American Rifleman...
     
  18. Donm

    Donm Active Member

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    Another thing that Vic was good at was hunting and live pigeon shooting. Ray Sommers a well known dog trainer from Random Lake Wi. told me several stories about some of the live bird shoots they had there in years gone bye. He said there were brief cases full of money exchanged with several thousands of dollars and Vic took his share of the loot. Vic always had time to share a story or ten about bird hunting all over the place. I didn't always agree with him about alot of things but you always knew where he was coming from and there was no doubt about what the point was he was trying to make. He never held back and let you have it straight in the face. One of the first times I shot doubles I was shooting a 870 TC. I was shooting on a squad with Vic on it. I don't recall what I broke but he said it was good to see a young man shooting a pump gun for doubles. That had to be along time ago. He called me a young man.
     
  19. senior smoke

    senior smoke Well-Known Member

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    Donm:
    Like you said, Vic never was one to hold back. One day, someone parked his car right up to the Waukesga gun club door. So close that it was hard to actually get in front of the car to walk in to the club house.

    As Vic was walking out of the club with another shooter, Vic said " I'd like to key that sob's car for parking the way he did. The guy Vic was with said, Vic you don't want to do that. Vic asked why not? The guy said because that's my car! Vic said get that sob away from the door before I get the tractor and move it myself.

    One time, Vic and I are shooting a tournament together and Vic always started on position 5. The guy on #4 was moving his feet a lot while Vic was shooting, as it bothered Vic. Vic politely asked him to stop moving around and the guy continued. Vic pulled his gun down from his shoulder and told the guy" the very next time you move while I am shooting I will shoot you in the leg". The guy never moved again for the remaining round.

    Vic was shooting on a squad and a fairly new shooter started arguing about a rule with the trap boy. Vic walked over and told him that the trap boy was correct and Vic said your target is a lost target.

    The guy got upset with Vic and said" who the hell are you that you supposedly know all the rules? Vic said I'm Vic Reinders and I rewrote the GD rule book. The guy said OH, put his head down and everyone continued to shoot.
    Steve
     
  20. midalake

    midalake Well-Known Member

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    When I first started ATA I had many times to see Vic shoot and listen to him and see him with other shooters. I never really knew him but was squadded with him once at doubles. We tied that day and shot off. Even though I have lost very few shoot-off's this day was one of those losses. After wards I shook his hand and said you shoot pretty good doubles with that pump [that rusted, busted ratttle trap of a gun]

    He said "well there is not much to do between the two targets anyway"

    GS
     
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