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Venison Tender Loin, I Need a Recipe

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by lbshootin, Jul 8, 2008.

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  1. lbshootin

    lbshootin Active Member

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    Hello Fellow Venison Harvesters,
    Notice I didn't say DEER HUNTERS? There is a difference, ya know!!! I have a full tenderloin of Texas White Tail (about four pounds worth) sitting in the refridgerator, just waiting for a NEW, good recipe. I took this out of the freezer last night and it has been cooling ever-so-slowly. So, send me your favorite venison recipe and I will give it a try, and if I have any leftovers, I may even take some up to the gun range to "show-off"..I have a smoker and a grill, so let me know...Thanks in Advance, LarryB
     
  2. bbqnic

    bbqnic TS Member

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    take your loin put itin a non metalic pan mix 1 cup of olive,1/4 cup brown sugar,1/4 cup soy sauce,table spoon bl peper,1/4 cup apple cider vinegar,6 cloves of garlic crushed and diced mex it all togeter pour over meat and let sit over night. take all purpose flour 1 cup and put 1 table spoon black pepper and 1 tsp salt mix set aside. cut your meat in 1/2 in. slices and pound with mallet till thin put 2 tbl sp of butter in pan melt and dredge meat lightly in flour and saute for about 45 seconds turn for another minute remove all pieces from pan and add 1/2 cup merlot wine to pan and reduce till about 2 tbl sp left and add beef stock to it about 3/4 cup and reduce in half add 2 tbl butter melt and pur over medalions um
     
  3. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Here's an easy one.

    Cut the loin in about 1 inch thick pieces. Wrap with bacon and coat with Chef Pauls blackening spice for beef.


    <a href="http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v337/Jim45/Gun%20stuff/?action=view&current=Blackenedbackstrap.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>


    Medium hot grill, Turn once and cook till pink in center.Do not over cook.


    <a href="http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v337/Jim45/Gun%20stuff/?action=view&current=Blackenedbackstrapongrill001.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>


    Enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!


    <a href="http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v337/Jim45/Gun%20stuff/?action=view&current=Blackenedbackstrapreadytoeat.jpg" target="_blank">[​IMG]</a>




    Jim
     
  4. BAD 303

    BAD 303 Active Member

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    Here is a real easy one and i have yet to find one that tastes better. Soak the entire tenderloin in a pan with equal parts of soy,teriaki and add a cup of brown sugar and then poor a 20 oz. bottle of coca cola over all of that. Let it sit for 24-48 hours and turn it or stir it if you like. Cook it on a charcoal grill no gas. Sear both sides over the hot coals for about 10 minutes per side depending on how hot the coals are. Then finish cooking off to the side. It may take 30-45 minutes and do not over cook. By searing it on both sides first it will help hold what juices are in it in. Awesome flavor.
     
  5. 22hornet

    22hornet Well-Known Member

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    I'm kind of in the same frame of mind as doda. Venison is best cooked rare. Hot grill, salt and pepper to taste, and just sear it. Best eatin' ever. The reason wild game tastes "gamey' is because people cook it until it becomes tough as a boot and ends up tasting like liver. Yuck.
     
  6. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    yep. Don't overcook it and it will be good.
     
  7. bobby ward

    bobby ward Member

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    Jim101,

    WHAT THE HELL TIME IS DINNER AT YOUR PLACE!!!!!!!! Dayem do those steaks look fabulous!

    The death knell sounds for venison steaks the very second they pass the 145 degree mark for internal temperature. DO NOT DO IT! And remember with venison OR ANY OTHER lean meat, it cooks quicker than meat with a lot of fat/marbling. Takle care of it!

    Ok, here is my recipe. Simple and very delicious.

    Season the tenderloin lightly with your favorite spices. Mine are garlic salt, rosemary, thyme (leave the parsley and sage to Simon and Garfunkel) and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap. Let it sit overnight in the fridge and next day when you are ready to cook, fire up the Weber and arrange the charcoal for the indirect cooking method. (Charcoal on each side and a drip pan in the middle) I like to put some liquid in the pan so that it evaporates and adds some flavor as well. I have used wine, bourbon, beef stock and worcestershire sauce..... insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the loin and cook it slowly until the internal temp is around 135. Take it off and wrap it in foil and let is sit for 15 minutes while you do your final preparations for the rest of the meal. As with any meat, "resting" allows the meat to absorb the juices back into the meat and it will rise in temperature 5-8 degrees after while it sits.

    If this fails you or you don't want to take the chance..Go to Jim101's house!!!!!!
     
  8. trapshootingfran

    trapshootingfran TS Member

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    If you truly love the taste of venison than all you need to do is be sure to remove all silver skin, salt and pepper heat some butter cook until med. about 3 mins. perside of a 1 inch madalion. Eat and enjoy.
     
  9. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Are you talking the backstraps or the tenderloin? I don't think I ever got 4lbs of tenderloin out of any deer I've ever shot.

    Doug
     
  10. Mr Newbius©

    Mr Newbius© TS Member

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    Doug ... it was a Texas whitetail and everyone knows things are bigger in Texas.
     
  11. pdq

    pdq Member

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    I cooked one last week.

    I keep it simple, as I don't want to mask the taste with a lot of strong flavorings. Salt & pepper then quickly brown one side. When first side done, flip it, and immediately put in a 225F oven.

    Cooked to just a bit above rare, it will be tender & delicious. Paired with a good bottle of Zinfandel wine & even better.

    I've seen people soak it with things like Italian salad dressing -- for people who don't want to know they are eating venison, I suspect that's a good way to go.

    Pete
     
  12. Jennifer

    Jennifer Member

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    That's a lot of tenderloin! We are meat hunters in SW Idaho - we usually get two mule does a season next to our house, which we immediately dress out and butcher right here. If the kill was in the evening, we hang the carcass in the garage overnight and then dress it out in the morning (that meat is always better). The meat is very tender and delicious. I must say this before I give you my recipe, because we don't need to cover up any gamey-ness because there isn't any. If you killed a large, older buck or if it had ran for a while before going down you might want to soak the tenderloins in milk overnight. Having said that, this is what I do for almost all meat and fish I cook on the BBQ:

    After the meat is thawed, put it in a zip-lock bag with some italian salad dressing and a dash of soy sauce (don't over-do it or it will be too salty). The more soy sauce you put in, the shorter the marination time. The combination should have a light brownish color. Add some Montreal steak seasoning in the bag and sort of mush it around with your hands so it's mixed. Let it sit for up to an hour in the fridge and then grill on the BBQ. If you're going to use a charcoal BBQ, you can use even less soy sauce, because there is so much more flavor from a charcoal grill than a gas grill. Our doe tenderloins are small so we don't need to cut them up, we just cook them whole. As the marinade dries out on the meat you can drizzle the rest of the dressing from the bag on the meat as it cooks.

    Cook the meat for a short time! You don't want shoe-leather, so take it off the grill when the meat is still flexible and bending when you move it. I like my venison rare so I don't cook it for very long.

    We had friends over and served them BBQ backstraps using the same recipe. One of them had never had venison before and said it was one of the best pieces of meat he had EVER eaten. Try it!

    Enjoy,

    Jennifer
     
  13. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Lots of guys have called the back strap "tenderloin" over the years for some reason. Like those above, I've never heard of a deer big enough for a 4 pound tenderloin!

    I cook my back strap/loins as Jim101 does also. YUM!! Hap
     
  14. Jennifer

    Jennifer Member

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    Hap, what Larry describes does sound more like backstraps. Our mule doe tenderloins aren't usually much more than an inch thick but the backstraps are a different story. Nice and thick. Good as, or better than beef filet mignon. I think it's time to root around in the meat locker and thaw some venison out - all this game meat talk is making me hungry!!!

    By the way, using my recipe that's above, I often cook venison sirloin steaks (till they're rare) on the BBQ and serve with strong horseradish and sides like beans, a baked potato with chives and sour cream. Oh my... it doesn't get any better...

    Jennifer
     
  15. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Jen, I'll try yer ree-cipe! Hap
     
  16. RogerNRA

    RogerNRA TS Member

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    Cut the loin in 1/2 in. medalions. Flour heavily on both sides. Use a cast iron skillet or a non stick skillet and brown both sides in olive oil or butter. Remove from skillet and place in a coverd pan or dish. Deglaze skillet with 1/2 cup of red wine. Return venison to skillet and cook with the stock covered until Med (DO NOT OVER COOK). When Venison is done, cook down remaining stock and use as sauce or gravey............Darn, I have made myself hungry........Roger
     
  17. poacherjoe

    poacherjoe Well-Known Member

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    Cast iron skillet ,butter, S&P ,fresh chopped GARLIC!! Simple and delicious!!!Cook everything together a keep it RARE. PJ
     
  18. lbshootin

    lbshootin Active Member

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    Sorry for the Texas Whitetail Deer tale.....after thawing the things out, I did discover that my 2003 ELK was mispackaged and placed into the freezer along with the deer....So the "LOINS" I was referring to actually came off (out) of an Arizona Bull 3x4 ELK!...I have always taken the 'Straps and tenderized, dreged, and "Chicken Fried" them!..Can't wait to try the above recipes on different cuts of the meat...I have always loved "WILD GAME" compared to "Mad COW"!..Have ya ever tried bacon wrapped Dove breast filets wrapped in thin cut Venison Strips?..Um-Um-Good! Now, that is a treat!....lb
     
  19. handlepuller

    handlepuller Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what some of y'all are shooting, but our corn-fed deer in the midwest don't need anything more than a little salt and pepper.

    Keep it simple!
     
  20. lots of 24's

    lots of 24's Member

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    Seems to be some serious deer hunters on this thread. Myself included. I have a serious question for guys/gals. Have you ever really had a deer that was tough because you made a bad shot and it "ran a lot" or didnt die right away? My dad and I together have killed 4-5 deer a year for the last 28 years and I have never had a tough one. Unfortunately not all of them were clean kills....but i mean thats a lot of deer......... Skin them immediately at home, let em hang a few days weather permitting. we butcher them all ourselves, bone them all out, absolutely no fat left on the meat. And we have never had a tough one. I have always dismissed that running deer thing as city slicker urban legend. Is there any truth to it??

    Back to the original thread...........i really like to use McCormicks meat marinade........let it marinate for a day or two or even more.........outstanding no matter how you cook it after that.
     
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