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Venison Question

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by gspman, Nov 29, 2010.

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  1. gspman

    gspman Member

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    Guys,

    I have a vension processing question. I shot a deer on November 13 at 10:00AM and had it field dressed, ice in the body cavity and at the processor by 2:00 PM. Indiana's opening day was warm about 65 degrees. It took until November 26th for the processor to buthcher my deer. They said they skinned it around the 16th (because of some Muslim holiday)and it hung in their meat locker until the 26th when they butched it. They certainly did not do FIFO. I was the sixth deer delivered for processing. Needless to say, I am never using them again. Thankfully they did not lose my head that I am having mounted.

    How long is too long in cold storage before the meat goes bad? I opened a package of chops and they had a very strong smell. Cooked up OK, but given the amount of Blood in the meat, I'm not sure it is OK. How do I tell?

    gspman

    (Dave P)
     
  2. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Really no way to tell what the processer did which is why it is best to do the preliminary work yourself. Next time, get that hide off asap and wash it down very well. You can do this yourself in the field if necessary. The attention to detail comes readily if you keep reminding yourself that you are going to eat this stuff.

    If the head wasn't caped out within 24 hours you probably don't have much to salvage there. Again that is a job you need to do asap.

    As far as hanging, two weeks is okay if the conditions are correct. Since the hide didn't come off for quite some time I would doubt that anything else was correct. Usually one week is sufficeint for the smaller animals like deer.

    If it smells bad, it probably is, I wouldn't feed something like that to my family.
     
  3. EE

    EE Banned User Banned

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    65 degrees is cold. It was 98 in South Carolina on opening day. Regardless, you should skin the deer yourself right away, then take it to the processor and put it in his cooler. 2 weeks in the cooler before butchering is ok, but 5-7 days is ideal.
     
  4. shooterIII

    shooterIII Member

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    I wouldn't let any processor touch my wild animal. I started processing my own 45 years ago, because you don't know if you get your own meat back or someone else'.
     
  5. sharks

    sharks TS Member

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    There should not be hardly any blood in the meet or any deer fat on it or it will have a bad taste and smell and the other guys are right about hanging 5 to seven days is plenty long. I'm from Indiana also and do our own butchering for the last 35yrs. If you are close by I can put you on to some meat processors who will do a good job.
     
  6. Bill Hom

    Bill Hom TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    If you want quality venison, you will have to learn to take care of and process it yourself. There are several good DVD's available on how to process your own meat. That way you will be sure to have your own meat and know what care it has had. It is very easy. just remember when trimming, if it doesn't look like something you want to eat,trim it off. I have been processing my own game meat for over 20 years. You will not believe how much better your venison will taste. Bill
     
  7. Beni

    Beni Member

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    Field dress your Deer ASAP,then skin it and wash only the body cavity,as water gets the bacteria effect started. If the prosessor cannot get it into the cooler right away,quater it out put in unscented garbage bags and into a fridge. About 20 yearsago I had cool weather eneough to let a skinned deer hang for a month,its called aging meat, that venison was super good. P.S. learn how to process your own its much better. beni
     
  8. gspman

    gspman Member

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    Thanks for the responses. You just confirmed what I was thinking.

    Sharks,I'm located in Noblesville and used Archer's in Fishers. I usually use Archer's in Greenwood and never had a problem with them and always a quick turnaround.

    To say that I am unhappy with the Fishers crew is an understatement. Never again.

    They froze my cape right away so hopefully things will work out with the taxidermist.

    Dave
     
  9. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    A few years back, a gentleman from Central TX told me that I should try this if I intended to process my own venison. After gutting and skinning, quarter the deer and dump all of it into a large cooler (140 quart is what we use). Pack ice on top of it completely covering the carcuss. Open the drain hole in the cooler and prop the cooler up slightly to allow draining. Continue to add ice as time goes on keeping the carcuss completely covered with ice. The slow trickle of ice water will wash most, if not all of the blood out of the meat. We had always soaked and rinsed our venison in water before cooking to remove any blood. This way, you are removing most blood before freezing. We think this does work and makes a tough old buck delicious...not gamey.

    Good luck,

    miltie
     
  10. hunter44

    hunter44 Well-Known Member

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    Miltie: How long do you continue the ice treatment before processing your venison?
     
  11. mette56

    mette56 Well-Known Member

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    Three days minimum. After the process is complete, we open the cooler and rinse the ice/deer mixture with a water hose until all of the ice is melted and drained to add to the "rincing" effect. Caution, if you leave the cooler outside to drain, animals will be attracted to the smell of blood and will chew at the drain spout...ruining it. What I don't know about this type of process, will this take the place of "hanging" a deer for ageing before processing/freezing? i.e., does the act of hanging the carcuss have a bearing on ageing, or is it just time from gutting to processing and freezing that produces the "ageing" process?

    Anyone here know the answer to that?

    Thanks,

    m
     
  12. AEST BOSS

    AEST BOSS Member

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    I do the above ice trick on ducks. Makes all the difference in the world. Gets all that blood out of the meat. Less gamey tasting.
     
  13. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    As I have said many times.. I have shot old bucks that were fork tender and not hung for i minute, I have ate old bucks that were gamesy and hung for a week. I have also ate gamey bucks that were not hung at all.

    My deer are cut up and packaged the same day they are shot. It takes the meat 2 days to defrost in teh fridge. That is all the hang time they get and they get that as matter of the defrosting process.

    Deer that eat good food and are cared for quickly will tase good most of the time. Hanging a deer does nothing. I have eaten to many bucks that didn't benifit from hanging to bother with it. Besides many deer are hung in a garage and not in a carefully controlled cooler/freezer. Even if it did help I suspect the only way it would help would be in a carefully controlled temp. Not most peoples garages.Jeff
     
  14. unioncracker

    unioncracker Member

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    Mette56 has the right idea not that some others don't. From the moment the deer is on the ground what you do matters. Field dress it immediately. If it is in the low 30's take a stick and prop open the chest cavity. Get the skin off of it ASAP. Put it in a cooler like meete56 suggests for 3-6 days no more but you have got to keep fresh ice on it. Any aging helps to break down the natural enzymes in the connective tissue hince more tender meat. When you get ready to cook it soak in milk for 2-5 hours,wash and cook.
     
  15. One Eyed Left Handed

    One Eyed Left Handed TS Member

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    I'm a firm believer in quickly gutting, hanging and skinning deer I've taken (59 and counting), especially in warmer weather. I quit hunting within 15 minutes of harvesting any deer and field dress at a minimum. Hanging (rinse body cavity if needed) and skinning and into a refrigerator wrapped in damp towels within 4 hours is my preference.

    If a yearling I may not worry much about aging, otherwise I'll age in the refrig anywhere from 5 to 10 days max usually working up the deer in the interim along with eating a few meals of the fresh venison along the way.

    I also believe in big time trimming , when I put in in the fridge and when I process it. I don't eat no junk parts and have rarely been displeased with fresh venison.

    Eddie Quire
     
  16. lots of 24's

    lots of 24's Member

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    Boy oh boy. I see some good ones here. Heres what I know to be true, becuase I have done it, lived it, and eaten it all my life. I have never, not even once had a tough or gamey tasting deer. I am 54 years old. My dad and I (both) got 2-3 deer a year since I was 23. Thats a lot of deer. We never wash them or ice them. We always hang them til the meat "sets up", unless its too warm. We always skin them immediately upon getting them home. Always. We cut them up ourselves. We take every single little speck of fat off every single piece of meat. We de-bone everything. We never use a saw on the meat. We take longer to do it than our neighbors do, but its perfect. Its delicious. Its way too much work to get the deer , not to enjoy the meat. Some of these stories I see here, its no wonder people get gamey, tough venison.

    My personal favorite old wives tale is the deer that was shot while it was running, so it had more stuff running thru its veins than the deer they got the year before that was standing or walking. Man.....that one is told with a straight face too.
     
  17. shooterIII

    shooterIII Member

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    I realize that is to late for the info at above website to do you any good for this year, but the DVD at this website is invaluable. I have all of them and they are the best I have seen.
     
  18. Bill Hom

    Bill Hom TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    All that I have found in my experience, is that all you get out of aging deer is that it seems to make the meat darker and stronger in flavor. It will breakdown in the freezer. Break it down into muscle sections, trim out all of the fat and glands. Do not let your knife cut a fat gland or it will spread the gamey nasty strong taste onto the freshly cut meat. Bill
     
  19. sharks

    sharks TS Member

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    gspman I'm from Danville and Greenwood does a nice job and also Kennys fine meats in Mooresville does a excellent job . But like most of the guys say it's better doing it yourself 'you know what meat you're going to get back and how it is really cleaned up. The best thing to do is have the whole deer made into summer sausage but hide it or you won't have any to eat for yourself.
     
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