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Using Linseed oil

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by maka, Jun 5, 2010.

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  1. maka

    maka Member

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    Have not used it on gun wood but, thave used it on funiture. Take about an oZ. thin it with mineral spirits to a ratio of 1 to 1. Good luck.
     
  2. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    The secret to oil finishes is a very thin coat, rubbed in hard and then allowed to fully dry. One coat every 2 or three days is not too slow. Polish it smooth and clean with cheese cloth before rubbing on another thin coat. If you want a little darker tint, Birchwood Casey Tru Oil is a good product but a lot more per ounce than boiled lindseed oil. Take your time and your oil finish will come out better than most of the new technology stuff. The nice thing about an oil finish, is that if you have to touch up and rub out a blemish with 0000 grade steel wool, the new oil will blend to the existing without a seam or overlap line.
     
  3. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    If you heat the oil/mineral spirits mixture up slightly it will penetrate the wood better and dry faster ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  4. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

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    slic - not certain of your objective so my response will be general. Linseed oil cannot penetrate a finish. Linseed oil (by itself) really cannot dry. It will penetrate unfinished wood but it still will not dry. You need to add japan dryer or cut it with with mineral spirits. this stuff has to be rubbed into the wood. Very tedious work.

    FYI - These guns were not called model 97s until around 1912, serial number 500,000. That is when the marking was moved to the barrel.
     
  5. semperfi909

    semperfi909 Well-Known Member

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    Get a copy of Gunstock Finishing and Care by Newell. Long out of print but still around. Newell was a paint industry chemist - that's as in educated. If you want the truth and not the traditional BS you will benefit greatly from Newell.

    I'm not sure what you might do with that linseed oil. Maybe some deluded "collector" will take it off your hands. You certainly don't want to put it on anything you own or want to keep.

    Charlie
     
  6. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    Yoda,

    I have an Anton stock on a Model 12 that needs someone like you to make it look like the picture you have above ... That turned out absolutely beautiful ... How much would you charge me to do that to it ..? WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  7. les morgan

    les morgan TS Member

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    I have had good results with Pilkington Stock Rubbing Oil from Brownells. Apply with rottenstone and a felt pad to enhance the polishing action.
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    If you've never done a stock before, practice on another gun or an old stock.

    And Birchwood Casey Tru-Oil is easy to use, if you will have patience and follow the directions. I've used it numerous times on old rifle stocks. Expect it to take time. It's not unusual to take a month or so to finish a stock. The biggest mistake people make is putting on heavy coats. Use thin coats, and do the prep work between coats. I rarely use stains. Stains work best for light woods like birch or beech. Tru-Oil will darken walnuts stocks, so unless you want it really dark, or want to tint it towards perhaps a reddish color, skip the stain. This is a big difference from other oils. I also do not use any kind of a sealer or gloss finish. Tru-Oil will be a semi-gloss that leans slightly to gloss. You can tone it down to a matte if you wish. If you like super glossy, Birchwood Casey has such sealers available.

    Checkering can either be left bare wood, or it can be sealed. The problem is you want to use as little oil as possible. I mask off the area around the checkering, and apply Tru-Oil with a toothbrish, using as little as I can, rubbing it in well. Don't build up layers. One, maybe two applications, is more than enough for checkering. After the checkering is finished and completely dry, avoid getting more finish on it. Mask it if need be. If the checkering needs prior work, you can get an entry level set of checkering tools and recut.

    One precaution about refinishing. One of the biggest tip offs that a stock has been refinished is that the wood is not "proud". Factory original stocks will have the wood rising slightly above the metal. This is called being "proud". Wood that is flush, or worse, lower than the metal, is undesirable. Don't be aggressive with sanding to clean the stock up. If you're trying to remove the original finish, get a good wood stripper. Birchwood Casey makes a stripper in a spray can that works, but is not super aggressive like some other products. use it and steel wool.

    If you've not done much woodwork, remember to always sand or buff with the grain, not across it.

    And again, practice on an old stock first.

    Simplistic brochure by Birchwood Casey, but it shows some color photos of the finish

    Good tips here, but alas, their photos don't show.

    You Tube Video Stock Refinishing Part 1

    You Tube Video Stock Refinishing Part 2

    You Tube Video Stock Refinishing Part 3

    You Tube Video Stock Refinishing Part 4
     
  9. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    Thats what I was afraid of, oh well, thanks anyway ... Sure looks purty ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  10. Hill topper

    Hill topper Member

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    I asked Wenig what they reccomended and they said they use a product called Linspeed.
    Not sure of the spelling.

    I remember using it a long time ago.

    ed.
     
  11. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    Lin-Speed... <I>http://www.lin-speed.com/</i>

    I'd stay away from linseed oil for a gun stock. Improperly applied it will remain tacky for nearly ever. Even properly applied it will emit that characteristic odor for as long as it takes to fully polymerize, which could be nearly as long.

    Use something modern designed for the job.

    MK
     
  12. semperfi909

    semperfi909 Well-Known Member

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    wood is wood

    linseed oil in any form with the name in it is poop. that red Win stuff is prolly nothing more than boiled linseed oil - BLO - and BLO sucks

    Almost every modern commercial product, not touted as BLO, is renamed spar varnish. Cut to the chase and just get a can of quality spar varnish and follow Newell's instructions. You will never look back.

    but then again, it's your gun. You can smear anything you like on it.

    Charlie
     
  13. PGL

    PGL TS Member

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    Tung oil is the best for natural wood by itself or mixed in a stain, Linseed oil is a great ingredient in house paints of the past and also for softer woods, it protects the wood and repels moisture well.
    Mineral spirits is a petroleum based solvent that will dry out the wood over time and gradually darken with prolonged sun exposure. It's a by-product of crude oil refining, would you put gasoline on your fine hardwood stock?
    Oderless mineral spirits is not much better.

    The best solvent for oils and transparent stains on naked wood is Turpentine or Gum Turpentine, it's refined from tree sap and pulp, same "tree" that your stock came from, it's also been around longer than gasoline, artists and fine painters have used it for it's purity and drying principles for centuries.

    I was shown years ago by a master woodturner the results of using different oils and solvents on finished wood. Best test is get small pieces of the same wood from lumber or cabinet shop and try different oils and stains, a lot easier and cheaper than a gun stock. you can always sand down finish on scrap wood vs gunstock to test another finish, same principle as reloading recipies. A great trick for your second coat after you're happy with your first application is mix your tung oil and turpentine in a pot then heat it outside on a camp stove - don't boil it (be careful just a little flamable...), then apply it with a brush and rub it in with a clean rag, the stock will absorb it like a sponge, this is a great base for multiple coats of finish. keep all oily rags outside when done, fumes are very flamable.


    Don't forget the second thing you look at on a long gun is the wood, the first is where it's pointed ...

    Most stockmakers keep their fine finishing secrets to themselves- they've earned that right in their profession, but the hobby woodworkers I've talked to brag and share their secrets.

    check out these links.


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turpentine

    http://www.cnew.org/tips_techniques/finishing_secrets.htm#Intro

    https://www.woodworkersinstitute.com/page.asp?p=589

    start on page 85 on this one

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/3601874/Mod-2-Gun-Stocks

    I've been told to try this product by itself no top finish


    http://www.waterlox.com/products-item/waterlox-original-penetrating-tung-oil-floor-sealer-finish.aspx

    I think that is enough info for now...

    PGL
     
  14. semperfi909

    semperfi909 Well-Known Member

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    The protection from water provided by linseed oil is just about zip. Old Brit guns that were oil finished were protected by WAXING - very frequent waxing and they always did the metal too. They knew. Should not be a trick to find tables on permeability on the 'net. Or just get a copy of that Newell book like I mentioned before and discover a few scientific facts that are not opinions.

    good luck

    Charlie
     
  15. Danny56

    Danny56 TS Member

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    If working with Linseed Oil be very careful with the rags that you through away. They can be very combustible. Always soak them in water before you dispose of them.
     
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