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United States Military vs. Dept. Homeland Security

Discussion in 'Politics, Elections & Legislation' started by WS-1, Feb 18, 2013.

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  1. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Most of the notorious Obama apologists here at Trapshooters.Com have rationalized for themselves that a member of our military would not fire on a citizen of the United States of America. What laws have been written to protect us from the stormtroopers over at DHS?
     
  2. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    Huh? What are you talking about? Why is anyone from DHS considered a storm trooper? Besides Border Patrol and Customs & Border Protection Inspectors at the Ports of Entry, along with the Agricultural Inspectors, also part of CBP, there are the ICE guys that primarily work the old functions of U.S. Customs and Immigration, how are they "storm troopers?"

    I guess Secret Service is part of DHS along with the non-armed, non-law enforcement TSA Officers at the airports, and the Coast Guard, guess they could start sinking fishing boats on Lake Michigan if the boat owner refuses to hand over an 'assault weapon.'

    So, in your scenario, what? this is your make believe scenario, fill me in... Obama will order the Husbands, Wives, Fathers, Sons, Daughters, Brothers, Sisters, many of whom are military veterans, U.S. Citizens, members of local communities, churches, school boards, etc, like everyone else... to what? Abandon the airports, borders, etc.. and start going house to house to round up guns and shoot those that refuse to surrender their weapons?

    Really? Not going to happen anymore than local and state law enforcement who are still U.S. Citizens, former veterans, members of local community, etc.. see aforementioned for other attributes... to do the same thing.
     
  3. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Allow me to rephrase the question. What laws have been written to protect us from the stormtroopers at DHS?

    Oh, and another innocent little question:why does DHS need .40 cal hollow point ammo for target practice?
     
  4. timberfaller

    timberfaller Well-Known Member

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    And a 100 year supply at that!!

    Seen this bumper sticker awhile back,

    "Fear the Government that Fear's its Citizens"
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    DHS Watchdog OKs ‘Suspicionless’ Seizure of Electronic Devices Along Border

    By David Kravets

    02.08.13

    The Department of Homeland Security’s civil rights watchdog has concluded that travelers along the nation’s borders may have their electronics seized and the contents of those devices examined for any reason whatsoever — all in the name of national security.

    The DHS, which secures the nation’s border, in 2009 announced that it would conduct a “Civil Liberties Impact Assessment” of its suspicionless search-and-seizure policy pertaining to electronic devices “within 120 days.” More than three years later, the DHS office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties published a two-page executive summary of its findings.

    “We also conclude that imposing a requirement that officers have reasonable suspicion in order to conduct a border search of an electronic device would be operationally harmful without concomitant civil rights/civil liberties benefits,” the executive summary said.

    The memo highlights the friction between today’s reality that electronic devices have become virtual extensions of ourselves housing everything from e-mail to instant-message chats to photos and our papers and effects — juxtaposed against the government’s stated quest for national security.

    The President George W. Bush administration first announced the suspicionless, electronics search rules in 2008. The President Barack Obama administration followed up with virtually the same rules a year later. Between 2008 and 2010, 6,500 persons had their electronic devices searched along the U.S. border, according to DHS data.

    According to legal precedent, the Fourth Amendment — the right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures — does not apply along the border. By the way, the government contends the Fourth-Amendment-Free Zone stretches 100 miles inland from the nation’s actual border.

    Civil rights groups like the American Civil Liberties Union suggest that “reasonable suspicion” should be the rule, at a minimum, despite that being a lower standard than required by the Fourth Amendment.

    “There should be a reasonable, articulate reason why the search of our electronic devices could lead to evidence of a crime,” Catherine Crump, an ACLU staff attorney, said in a telephone interview. “That’s a low threshold.”

    The DHS watchdog’s conclusion isn’t surprising, as the DHS is taking that position in litigation in which the ACLU is challenging the suspicionless, electronic-device searches and seizures along the nation’s borders. But that conclusion nevertheless is alarming considering it came from the DHS civil rights watchdog, which maintains its mission is “promoting respect for civil rights and civil liberties.”

    “This is a civil liberties watchdog office. If it is doing its job property, it is supposed to objectively evaluate. It has the power to recommend safeguards to safeguard Americans’ rights,” Crump said. “The office has not done that and the public has the right to know why.”

    Toward that goal, the ACLU on Friday filed a Freedom of Information Act request demanding to see the full report that the executive summary discusses.

    Meantime, a lawsuit the ACLU brought on the issue concerns a New York man whose laptop was seized along the Canadian border in 2010 and returned 11 days later after his attorney complained.

    At an Amtrak inspection point, Pascal Abidor showed his U.S. passport to a federal agent. He was ordered to move to the cafe car, where they removed his laptop from his luggage and “ordered Mr. Abidor to enter his password,” according to the lawsuit.

    Agents asked him about pictures they found on his laptop, which included Hamas and Hezbollah rallies. He explained that he was earning a doctoral degree at a Canadian university on the topic of the modern history of Shiites in Lebanon.

    He was handcuffed and then jailed for three hours while the authorities looked through his computer while numerous agents questioned him, according to the suit, which is pending in New York federal court.
     
  6. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Report calls upon DHS to stop warrantless searches of electronic devices

    June 4, 2011

    By: Howard Portnoy

    If a man’s home is his castle, then it might be argued his computer in its many guises is the key to that castle. It is not uncommon in this digital age for people to maintain links to online bank accounts, copies of their tax returns, and myriad other personal data on their laptops, PDAs, and smart phones.

    It is because of this wealth of private electronically stored information that The Constitution Project (TCP), a bipartisan think tank in Washington, has published a new report. In it they call upon the Department of Homeland Security to amend its policy on warrantless searches at border crossings to exclude electronic devices.

    Historically, inspections at border crossings have been exempted from the Fourth Amendment constraint that searches and seizures be conducted upon reasonable suspicion and backed up a warrant. And up until now, the policy has seemed to make sense. After all, border agents should have free rein to inspect vehicles crossing, say, from Canada into the U.S. The process, after all, is no different in principle than customs inspectors examining luggage of passengers deplaning international flights.

    But the question TCP is raising in its report is whether border agents should have the same freedom to search electronic devices.

    The website of KPBS, an independent station affiliated with San Diego State University, reports that

    Sharon Bradford Franklin of The Constitution Project noted that in the past, personal files and information were kept at home, where authorities could not search without a warrant. Now, Bradford said, people could unwittingly and unwillingly be forced to allow access to such information during border inspections, where reasonable suspicion, probable cause and warrants are not currently required.

    The report raises further questions about where, when, and for how long devices can be searched. There are currently no restrictions on the length of time that border agents can retain an individual’s personal device.

    In its reaction to the report, the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol delivered pretty much the party line Americans have been hearing spouted by the Transportation and Security Administration since last November, when they unveiled their high-definition scanners and invasive pat-downs:

    DHS/CBP has the responsibility to search persons and items prior to admissibility into the U.S. Keeping Americans safe and enforcing our nation’s laws in an increasingly digital world depends on our ability to lawfully screen all materials—electronic or otherwise—entering the United States.

    In other words, Big Brother will continue to trample the Fourth Amendment, all in the name of safety, and there is not thing one any of us can do about it.
     
  7. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    You guys that hate the military and law enforcement and think they are coming for you are just plain wacko

    Regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  8. 548

    548 Guest

    Amen ^^^^
     
  9. Remdog1187

    Remdog1187 Well-Known Member

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    548 and his girlfriend Gene.
    Retards from Iowa?
     
  10. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    How hilariously hypocritical (and idiotic) is it that Chesty completely trusts the very same government... which he makes his pathetic living suing?

    -Gary
     
  11. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Gene,

    You are a crippled craven and a pathetic poltroon. You would benefit from long term psychiatric care in a closely supervised institutional setting. You don't belong in a public forum and I am amazed that the state of Iowa allows you to conduct arms trades.

    Please do not reply to any of my commments, posts, or threads in the future. You, and a few others like you, give Trapshooters.Com a bad name.

    Respectfully,

    Kit Thomas (WS-1)
     
  12. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    Kit, your way with words oft makes me laugh.

    -Gary
     
  13. TinMan88

    TinMan88 TS Member

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    Happy days are here again...
     
  14. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    The supreme court has said that warrant-less border searches are lawful, that includes electronic devices that possibly contain child pornography and other evidence of crimes, it is the same as an Inspector looking through your luggage for illegal drugs, cabbage, or Cuban cigars.

    I emphasize the term CHILD PORNOGRAPHY, that is the number one illicit material found on electronic devices possessed by U.S. citizens or aliens at Ports Of Entry!!!

    Here is the link for the guidance that CBP and ICE officer have to follow regarding the protection of personal information such as attorney client, medical, intellectual property rights,

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <body>


    Electronic Border Search Policy


    </body>
    </html>


    I challenge anyone to find a lawsuit in which the complaint was that the next greatest invention for "widget X" was stolen by a federal officer during a warrant less border search and then the officer turned around and sold that 'valuable' information, etc... It just doesn't happen.

    The complaint is that the searches in some cases take to long, and based on my experience, that is because there are OTHER aggravating factors that make law enforcement take a closer look at said person and STUFF when entering the U.S.

    The amount of child pornography found on computers and other electronic media today is astronomical! If there is nothing to hide, then what is the problem? I have ran across plenty of pedophiles that absolutely have problems with me searching their homes and computers! I get it, they don't want to go to jail for child pornography, etc... The majority of 'normal' human beings crossing the borders today that do not have illicit material on their computers have nothing to fear! Tens of thousands of people with electronic devices enter the U.S. daily via land, sea, and air and only a tiny fraction of these people are held up to have their electronic devices searched!

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <body>


    Just a sampling of the scum bags raping children that have pictures and video stored on their electronic devices...


    </body>
    </html>


    To take some article posted above literally makes it sounds like the average family that crosses into Canada to see Niagara Falls from the more scenic side is going to lose their cell phones, digital camera, and video recorder for months when they drive back across the border! Completely absurd and untrue...
     
  15. TinMan88

    TinMan88 TS Member

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    Don't worry, be happy....
     
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