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Ultra low sulfur diesel Fuel

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by BP348, Sep 28, 2007.

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  1. BP348

    BP348 Active Member

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    I'm wondering if anyone knows what the new ultra low sulfur diesel fuel will do to gas milage in diesel vehicles, specifically Volkswagon Jetta's.

    Thanks
     
  2. buzzgun

    buzzgun Member

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    If you have an existing Jetta, the fuel by itself shouldn't do much...as they ain't much BTUs in sulfur.

    However - if you're in the market for a new Jetta, keep in mind it will have the newer emissions pack & the basis for comparison may be different.


    I keep saying they ought to mate that 1.8 Turbodiesel (which already gets 49 mpg to start with), with a hybrid powertrain...you'd probably have about 60 mpg with off-shelf technology in a decent-size commuter car that isn't all faggy and fuc#ed up like a Prius and would get better mileage to boot. But obviously, them tightass engineers in Wolfsburg ain't listening to me. They're too worried about the exchange rate on the Euro right now...

    (I guess they'd rather sit around and wait for AlGore to outlaw the internal combustion engine)
     
  3. Ken X

    Ken X TS Member

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    I've got a diesel Jetta, and was told it will simply run a little cleaner! Thats it. Its certainly a car I couldn't be happier with. I drive a LOT and get 41-43mpg at 80+, and got 46 one time, still not driving like Grandma Moses, with more leg room than I ever had in any car. I might buy the New Passat Diesel for a family car. You want to know anything about a TDI, get on - TDIClub.com -
     
  4. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    VW has about 11 diesel engine models in Europe, we get a choice of two here in the US. Some time back I read that VW put together parts already available to see if they could beat the hybrids. I think it was 73 MPG their combination got with the 1.8 diesel. I bought a new 05 Passat diesel wagon with the auto trans and like it a lot. I do wish they'd have put a stronger air conditioning unit in it though. Too much space and glass to cool like I'd prefer here in AZ to suit me. Other than that, it's a dandy. Hap
     
  5. k80cmbo

    k80cmbo TS Member

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    I read an artical about Mercedes Benz had built a diesel in a concept car that got 85 MPG. The car looked like a fish,and was named after the fish.I had never herd of the fish so I can not tell you what it was.And,MB has no plans to mass produce this car.
    As for the VW.I'm waiting for the 08 jetta to arrive.Has anyone herd when the diesel will be avalible?I have never owened anything but American made cars and trucks.The time as come to buy for fuel mileage only.I have not found anything that is getting better mileage then the Jetta.One report and this is not from VW so I'm not sure if it is true,but,I hope it is. The 08 Jetta with the diesel in test has gotten as high as 60 MPG on the highway.I'm hopeing this is true.
     
  6. Shoot-at-em

    Shoot-at-em TS Member

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    I have a 2002 Jetta 5 speed and just started using the ultra low sulfer fuel. I usually get between 51 and 52 mpg with or without the a/c and no matter if its highway or city driving. Hard to believe. I haven't noticed any reduction in power or economy. I get a little lower mileage in the winter I guess due to longer warm up/idle times. Its great only having to fuel up every few weeks! I can't see why anyone would buy a hybrid with diesel cars performing so well.

    Frank
     
  7. midalake

    midalake Well-Known Member

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    I LOVE my 2004 TDI Jetta. It is the smartest purchase I have ever made. I just hope the lower lubrication fuel will not hurt the older ones.........

    GS
     
  8. 682LINY

    682LINY Member

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    have had problems in fleet use,,,we use ultra low in detroit deisels,,new type ,,,electronic injectors,,,,ok,,,had problems using this fuel in older GM 6.5 mechanical fuel injection systems,,,not enough lubricacation for mechanical pump,,,,pumps would over heat,,,,dont know what type pumps are in VW
     
  9. Tom Strunk

    Tom Strunk Well-Known Member

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    I have a 2006 Chevrolet 2500HD with the Duramax diesel and Allison 6 speed automatic. I have had no problems of any kind with the new fuel. Just returned from a trip from Arizona to Montana for my yearly bird hunting trip there. This trip lasted 9 days total, and covered over 3000 miles.

    My average fuel economy for the total trip was 20.7 mpg, damm good for a 7000+ lb. rig. This was at a steady 79 mph most of the time. It's not stock, it has a Magnaflow 4 inch exhaust and a PPE programmer set on level 2. One size larger Michelin tires. Speedometer was set with a GPS and is right on the money. Power output is listed on PPE's user guide book on level 2 as 520 hp and 940 ft. lbs. of torque. Top speed limiter has been reset to 135 mph. It' a lot of fun to drive. Passing is NO PROBLEM, as it is 100 mph plus right now.

    Tom Strunk
     
  10. Inkspot Kelly's Great-Nephew

    Inkspot Kelly's Great-Nephew TS Member

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    I always use a fuel additive in my diesels. They are formulated to add lubricity to fuel. Been running diesel cars and pickup trucks since 1974 with no problems. If you have access to biodiesel, put in 1 gallon to each tankful for maximum lubricity.

    Don't skip short on this issue. You can get a fine trapgun for the cost of an injector pump!

    Dave Shaeffer, Sr.
     
  11. Tdog

    Tdog TS Member

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    When you look at the cost difference and the increased complexity of a hybrid vehicle I don't think they are worth it. Especially if you keep you vehicles for a long time or if you put lots of miles on it. There is more energy in a gallon of diesel fuel than in gasoline and it takes less effort (should be lower cost)to produce diesel also. I've read and spoken to guys that claim they can get approx 150hp from their VW TDI's with out significantly reducing their fuel mileage. I believe the U.S. VW TDI's are derated to 90hp because of emission regulations.
     
  12. B.C.

    B.C. Member

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    Have a 2006 Jetta TDI average anywhere from 45 to 49 mpg , I also am a big fan of injector cleaner's try 2 oz of acetone to a tank ! B.C.
     
  13. Inkspot Kelly's Great-Nephew

    Inkspot Kelly's Great-Nephew TS Member

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    Irfner:

    Simple math:

    Sulfur in diesel fuel = lubrication.
    Diesel fuel - lubrication = Very Expensive injector pump replacement.

    You are partly right, but the sulfur in diesel is good for the injector pump.
     
  14. BP348

    BP348 Active Member

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    Thanks guys!!

    I'll let you know when/if I buy the Jetta.
     
  15. Rip12

    Rip12 TS Member

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    The only thing I noticed with the change in sulfur content is that my water in the fuel light comes on more often. Even right after I got my water fuel seperator changed. I have a ford 250, now it could be ford or it could be the new fuel at the pumps. This never happened before they changed over to the new low sulfur dieel.

    Those VW's are sweat I have been told by owner's of them that they get 50 MPG.
     
  16. Ken X

    Ken X TS Member

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    I believe that easily. I have had trips out in the country with no traffic where I get 42-44 at a mostly steady 90! At the speed limit 50mpg seems very likely. I never tried it for very long. I drive so much I would fall asleep from boredom! One of the greatest things about the car is you don't have to drive like an old lady to save a ton on fuel.(About $250 a month for me.) The hybrid drivers DO have to take it real easy to do well.
     
  17. incognito

    incognito TS Member

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    Rip12, I've never seen a car sweat. That must really be something! Does that mean they are hot, or that they stink? I usually sweat when I'm hot, and then I stink; that's why I ask.

    For the rest who are concerned about lubricity, run biodiesel. It is shown to increase mpg slightly, presumably due to its much greater lubricity and consequent reduction in friction.
     
  18. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Theres some good tips in this email I received concerning fuel and the delivery system from stations. Makes sence to me since water in fuel is bad news whether it's gasoline or diesel.

    "Gas Pumping Tips from someone in the Petroleum pipeline business!!

    I've been in petroleum pipeline business for about 31 years, currently
    working for the Kinder-Morgan Pipeline here in San Jose, CA. We deliver
    about 4 million gallons in a 24-hour period from the pipe line; one day
    it's diesel, the next day it's jet fuel and gasoline. We have 34
    storage tanks here with a total capacity of 16,800,000 gallons. Here
    are some tricks to help you get your money's worth.

    1. Fill up your car or truck in the morning when the temperature
    is still cool. Remember that all service stations have their storage
    tanks buried below ground; and the colder the ground, the denser the
    gasoline. When it gets warmer gasoline
    expands, so if you're filling up in the afternoon or in the evening,
    what should be a gallon is not exactly a gallon. In the petroleum
    business, the specific gravity and temperature of the fuel (gasoline,
    diesel, jet fuel, ethanol and other petroleum
    products) are significant. Eve ry truckload that we load is
    temperature-compensated so that the indicated gallonage is actually the
    amount pumped. A one-degree rise in temperature is a big deal for
    businesses, but service stations don't have temperature compensation at
    their pumps.

    2. If a tanker truck is filling the station's tank at the time
    you want to buy gas, do not fill up; most likely dirt and sludge in the
    tank is being stirred up when gas is being delivered, and you might be
    transferring that dirt from the bottom of their tank into your car's
    tank.

    3. Fill up when your gas tank is half-full (or half-empty),
    because the more gas you have in your tank the less air there is and
    gasoline evaporates rapidly, especially when it's warm. (Gasoline
    storage tanks have an internal floating 'roof' membrane to act as a
    barrier between the gas and the atmosphere, thereby minimizing
    evaporation).

    4. If you look at the trigger you'll see that it has three
    delivery settings: slow, medium and high. When you're filling up do not
    squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to the high setting. You should be
    pumping at the slow setting, thereby
    minimizing vapors created while you are pumping. Hoses at the pump are
    corrugated; the corrugations act as a return path for vapor recovery b"
    from gas that already has been metered. If you are pumping at the high
    setting, the agitated gasoline contains more vapor, which is being
    sucked back into th e underground tank b" so you're getting less gas for
    your money .
    Hope this will help ease your 'pain at the pump'" Hap
     
  19. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    "and the colder the ground, the denser the gasoline"

    Below about 3 feet of cover (though this varies from region to region), the ground stays a relatively constant temperature around 55°F; summer, winter, rain, shine, no matter. If the ground is at 55°F, I can't imagine the gasoline in the underground tanks will vary much from that temperature.

    Yes, the tanker trucks are temperature compensated, but they're above ground and subject to atmospheric conditions. Not so under the ground.

    "A one-degree rise in temperature is a big deal for businesses, but service stations don't have temperature compensation at their pumps"

    True for a business that deals in millions of gallons of gas a year. Probably completely insignificant to the average driver who uses less than 1000 gallons of gas a year. Same is true for Hap's items 3 and 4. For the amount of gas we use, the difference will be immeasurable.

    Item 2? Maybe, but each of the hoses should have a filter.
     
  20. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    timb99, the times I recall having water in my vehicles fuel tanks came when the pump was pumping gas really slow and the lever was wide open. Since then, I quit pumping gas when it's pumping real slow and go somewhere else to buy my gas. Hap
     
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