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Types of flinch

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Sigraph, Oct 19, 2009.

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  1. Sigraph

    Sigraph TS Member

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    Since flinching is a topic, I've experienced 2 types and was curious if the 2nd type is the kind usually refered to when having to go to a release trigger.
    The first type is typically a slight jerk when anticipating a firearm to go boom. I've experienced this by having a friend load my revolver for me whenever I 'think' I'm flinching. If I am, I'll usually slightly jerk pulling the pistol down. Never tried it with a rifle or shotgun though.

    The second type I've had only once when I was shooting registered trap. It was actually at a Tuesday night practice shoot which was basically a trap shoot without registering targets. I'd heard of shooters dropping their shotguns and in rare cases actually throwing their gun towards the traphouse (never seen it happen, just heard about it). In my case, I called for the target and in a split second noticed my gun didn't fire - also in that split second I uncontrollably JANKED the trigger after the target was on it's way down. It was kind of like that reflex jump you get every now and then when your dozing off to sleep.

    Are most of flinches refered to here usually of the second type? Also, has anyone actually seen a shooter drop or throw their gun when flinching.

    Just curious - Eric
     
  2. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    Yes Eric, everybody does the first, just load a blank round when the shooter isn't looking at you will see it everytime. It is not so much that it is a flinch as it is the body just tensing to the force, or anticipated force, of recoil, a purely natural reaction. It happens as you pull the trigger. A release trigger doesn't fix this nor do lighter loads. Lighter loads just hurt some people less.

    The second is when you can't pull the trigger when you want to. This is a random interruption of the neurological signal to pull the trigger. It is often referred to as a "visual flinch" as people think that the interruption is caused by losing or not establishing the bird/bead relationship. This is the type of flinch that a release trigger fixes.
     
  3. DecalDude

    DecalDude Active Member

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    I have kinda the second jerk to pull the trigger,from being used to triggers of target and varmit rifles.

    Jerry
     
  4. philk

    philk Member

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    Saw a guy actually take about three steps toward the house, thought he was going to launch his shotgun for a second.
     
  5. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    philk, you must have seen me in action!!
     
  6. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    1) - There are basically two types of flinches. Timing & recoil.

    2) - Don't listen to anything oleolliedawg tells you.

    Good hunting.
     
  7. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    I am not sure what a "flinch" is. But what yu describe in 2 is a "cross-fire" in me. Tell me whare you hold your gun? Paralell over the house or down on the house? I crossfire "jerk" the gun to get back to a target that I have moved left on because of my non-dominant eye taking over. I crossfired on most of my singles targets on Saturday. and the eye switching happens numerous times during the move to the target. So much so, that the gun bbl actually disappears until the shot process has ended. If this is the problem that you have, try fixing the problem without a release trigger. I rue the day I switched.

    YOu can PM me about this problem if we have this stuff in common. I have alot fo experience cross-firing and now a lot of experience trying to control it.

    Jack
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    To me, a flinch is a reflex action that occurs just before you pull or release the trigger. Things that happen after you pull the trigger and the gun fails to fire are another type of involuntary actions, but not a flinch.

    oleolliedawg- When my gun fails to fire, I only take two stumbling steps forward, not three like you.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Jon, there are many types of flinches-just ask me-I've mastered them all.

    Pat, I never knew you observed me do a three-step on the second target in Doubles. I'll ask Jon how he would categorize each of those!!
     
  10. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Bad triggers are one of the causes of flinching. You very rarely hear about flinching from target rifle and pistol shooters. Why? Because their guns have very good consistant weight of pull tiggers with little or no creep.

    That is why the release trigger usually solves the problem. When the brain sends the message to fire the gun, the trigger finger moves and the gun fires. Very consistant and repeatable.

    A friend just developed a flinch while shooting his new gun. We checked the trigger, 7 1/2 lb weight of pull, rough take up with a lot of creep. Smoothed trigger out, reset at 3 1/2 lb, and got rid of most of the creep. Flinch is now gone. HMB
     
  11. DTrykow

    DTrykow Active Member

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    I flinch because "I think" I'm not exactly on the bird. I'm almost sure it's sight picture. I shoot a K-80 with a 3.5lb trigger so it's not that. I started flinching with my previous gun a Citori Plus. I was looking into the Allem Roller release trigger for it, or get a Dryfire and practice my butt off in the basement. Dave T.
     
  12. Onceabum

    Onceabum TS Member

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    And then, there's the flinch with the hand holding the fore end.
     
  13. TEXASZEPHYR

    TEXASZEPHYR Member

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    Booger the fore hand flinch is most usually a cross firing problem. I dont like doing it but using the taped off lens on the off eye can do a lot toward that not happening. Not being able to pull the triger, I beleive falls with the brain is not seeing the correct sight pattern, or the brain saying to please dont hit me again. This week-end I wound up doing all three, I guess the release triger is my next step

    Bob
     
  14. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    I well know what you mean Booger, but I've not figured out the cause. Bob
     
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