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Two eye or One eye ?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by RDF, May 30, 2007.

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  1. RDF

    RDF TS Member

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    I have been shooting with both eyes open for the last 3-4 years, and only average in the 70's in singles and Handicap. Last time out I went back and tried it with one eye open and broke a 92 in singles, also broke a 77 in handicap which is one more then I've done this year. When shooting both eyes open when I miss I don't know were my gun was in relationship to the bird, but I do with one eye open. Are some shooters better with One eye then with Two? Should I go back to just using one eye open?

    Rick
     
  2. Mac V

    Mac V Guest

    There is no rule I'm aware of that requires you to use just 1 eye, both eyes or do anything like everyone else for that matter. You are free to use whatever techniques work best for you and, as long as they are safe, they are no one's concern but yours.

    Mike
     
  3. KelleyPLK

    KelleyPLK TS Member

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    When shooting dont look at beads! Lineup Beads at first . Then look out 3 feet or so above trap house lock on to bird with your eye /eyes dont look back at beads again try shooting that way . Look at bird only . You have all the time in the world !


    Pat Kelley
     
  4. lumper

    lumper TS Member

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    You mean your telling me that you actually have an eye open and used to shoot with both of them open???

    Dang ... maybe I gotta try opening one of mine so I can see the bird as well. Now which eye should it be ... left or right?
     
  5. OLD ONE EYE

    OLD ONE EYE Well-Known Member

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    Everyone is different I shot one eye for 40 years switched to two eyes a year ago could not hit the trap house but figured I needed to give it 5 to 10 thousand rounds like most people advised. Well it took a year or better but I refused to give up and one day it just clicked and I was off and running. It felt great but I was afraid I could not do it again. I could not wait to shoot again and I found out I could do it with consistency and have now shot the best scores of my life. I have to say that it is so much easier to shoot both eyes and for me much less strain I just wish I did it 30 years ago but once you master both eyes you will want to shoot even more. In my case shooting better scores make me want to shoot even more.
     
  6. ronbo142

    ronbo142 TS Member

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    Shoot what works for you, Don Snyder (NSSA Executive Director) is a one eyed AAA skeet shooter who teaches two eyed shooting.

    Ronbo
     
  7. zerafa

    zerafa TS Member

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    I was a one eye shooter, changed to two eye shooting, scores became the same more or less, one eyed you see exactly where you shot, two eyed you shoot automatically, when I bout a field gun had problems because POI was diffrent obviously so I cannot shoot automatically with the field gun, so, two eyed for the trap gun and one eyed for the field gun for now, somehow I have to go both with both eyes, slowly slowly, doing my best by shooting trap with field gun to get the same touch as the trap one, have to play a bitwith the field gun stock ://
     
  8. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Rick, it really does sound like you have an eye dominance problem, and you aim. I don't have a sure-fire answer for you, but maybe my experiences will help you sort it out.

    I don't have a dominant eye. When I focus on any object I see two of everything closer. I started out by shooting with just one eye open and didn't do very well. After several years of frustration I got a tip to start with both eyes open, then close the left just before I shot. It took a while to get used to that. When I did my success rate went up. I still had problems. The one-eyed bit caused me to aim (old rifle shooter), which required conscious decisions, and definitely slowed up the process. Also, I don't have as precise control as when my subconscious is doing the directing.

    Several year ago I decided I was going to learn how to shoot with both eyes open, no matter what it took. It was a most frustrating experience, and I'm not there yet. Along the way I found out the following:

    As hooptied suggests, gun fit is crucial. I don't think you can ever be a good two-eyed shooter unless your gun shoots exactly where you look.

    Second: if you cannot see the barrel/rib/bead when you set up, it is much easier. I have no problem (now) with hunting, or any clay target sport you can shoot with a low gun. I even shoot Skeet that way. With a low gun I can clearly see the target and establish its flight path, then mount the gun, swing and fire. It has become automatic. My gun fits and shoots where I look. I see the bird, then watch it fall/break. There is nothing that I can remember in between. It's all automatic.

    Third: premounting the gun as in ATA Trap causes me problems. The rib, beads and barrel obstruct sight in my right eye. That means my left eye has a clearer view and wants to take over. That is a very real problem and cause me to jerk the gun to the left just as I fire. It happens between 4 and 6 times per event, until I can retrain my automatic system.

    My somewhat effective fix for that is to hold my gun so that the bead is below the top of the trap house, or even below the back of the roof. Then I look above the house where i expect to pick up the bird. The barrel/beads are now far enough put of my line of sight that there is no obstruction. I see the bird, then make an automatic move on it. I only see the bead in relation to the bird after I fire. This is the only thing that works for me.

    I can't go back to one-eyed shooting without learning to shoot all over again. At a Phil Kiner clinic, he had me tape over then left lens then shoot. I didn't hit a single bird. I could clearly see the target and see the bead off to the side of it when I fired. Told to take the tape off, I did, and immediately began hitting again. Now that I was aware of that phenomenon, I've noticed it pretty much on a continual basis. For example, on a hard left my left eye naturally has a better view, so I'll often be aware of the barrel pointing to the right of the target when I fire. The target breaks, so that means my automatic targeting system has learned to compensate by shooting in the middle, not at what either eye sees. That means both eyes have to see the target. When one gets blocked I jab at the target at the last second. Mostly that's on lefts, but sometimes to the right.

    The real problem with adjusting like that is it requires a huge amount of practice. I don't shoot much in the winter because a lot of the clubs close or shoot on restricted schedules. When April rolls around and we start shooting ATA, I stink, as in 88-90. The more I shoot, the better I get. In June I shoot a lot, because that is when most of the State shoots are. I'll shoot 400 targets a day for three days, then do the same the following week. That is when my automatic system begins recalibrating. Then in July, August and September I shoot really well and that is when I get my 98s and 99s. In October the shoots are over and I don't shoot as much. And I get worse because I'm not shooting enough to keep my automatic system calibrated.

    So all in all, if you try one-eyed a couple more times and find out it wasn't a fluke, then stay with it. A couple of the very best shooters I know shoot one-eyed and win with it. If it was a fluke, I think you are better off sticking with two eyes and trying some of the things that worked for me. Good luck.
     
  9. Colonel Reb

    Colonel Reb TS Member

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    You had more fun and shot higher scores with one eye, didn't you? I tried to learn 2 eye because that's what all the books taught. I crossfired every time apparently because I never hit the birds. I shoot one eye now regardless of what anybody says. There is at least one top shooter that gives clinics around the country that shoots one eye, so that's good enough for me. It comes down to what breaks targets and what doesn't. Some may call one-eye shooting aiming. Whatever, it seems to break targets for a lot of people.
     
  10. FLAKETM

    FLAKETM TS Member

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    I can't imagine anyone shooting with one eye if the shooting eye is the dominant one -- unless perhaps it's Nora Martin. Just doesn't make sense. Take it from a one-eyed shooter who has been as frustrated as zzt and who has tried about everything over the last eight years. I may have finally found my answer, which is working for me. Maybe it won't work for anyone else. Who knows? I have a fiber optic tube sight on my TM1 AND a blinder. I now use somewhat of a Daro Handy method. I stare through the bright bead. As soon as I see the target my eyes going strictly to the target and I swing quickly, still trying to remain in complete control of the swing. By staring through the tubed bead, my dominant eye is not coming into play. When I miss, it's because I raise my head. ZZT is right about the gun fit. Dennis DeVault custom fit my stock and I shoot where I look. I used to shoot with one eye but contracted glaucoma and have a perephial vision problem in my shooting eye so I really need both eyes open. I hope your shooting eye is dominant. By the way, I couldn't switch to the other shoulder. I had shot left-handed for 40 years before I took up clay shooting. When the last of my four children left college, I was able to do the fun things.
     
  11. FLAKETM

    FLAKETM TS Member

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    I can't imagine anyone shooting with one eye if the shooting eye is the dominant one -- unless perhaps it's Nora Martin. Just doesn't make sense. Take it from a one-eyed shooter who has been as frustrated as zzt and who has tried about everything over the last eight years. I may have finally found my answer, which is working for me. Maybe it won't work for anyone else. Who knows? I have a fiber optic tube sight on my TM1 AND a blinder. I now use somewhat of a Daro Handy method. I stare through the bright bead. As soon as I see the target my eyes going strictly to the target and I swing quickly, still trying to remain in complete control of the swing. By staring through the tubed bead, my dominant eye is not coming into play. When I miss, it's because I raise my head. ZZT is right about the gun fit. Dennis DeVault custom fit my stock and I shoot where I look. I used to shoot with one eye but contracted glaucoma and have a perephial vision problem in my shooting eye so I really need both eyes open. I hope your shooting eye is dominant. By the way, I couldn't switch to the other shoulder. I had shot left-handed for 40 years before I took up clay shooting. When the last of my four children left college, I was able to do the fun things.
     
  12. revsublime

    revsublime TS Member

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    I have an eye dominance problem and my fix has been to put a small piece of tape on my left lense that obscures the front bead from my left eye. This also obscures the target from my left eye when i line up on it.

    I used to shoot with my left eye closed but after the tape on the lense trick told to me by a fellow member at the club I've notices my scores go up. If you totally obscure your off-target eye then you also obscure part of the vision of the target when it comes out. With the small piece of tape on my eye I can see the bird come out with both eyes but do not get cross-eyed when I put the bead on it.
     
  13. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    There are many good discussions to be found on this site. Do a search and you will find lots of good information about eye dominance and solutions.

    A lot of the information on this particular thread looks like folks just getting started in trapshooting and you would all benefit from the search. Don't try to figure out what has already been figured out by those that preceed you.

    Good Luck all.
     
  14. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I shot (poorly) with one eye for decades. Classic cross-firing with two eyes open.<br>
    <br>
    I installed a Uni-Dot, and within two months, I ran my first 25 and 50 with both eyes open.
     
  15. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Is it possible that this "cross firing" we hear so much about, comes from not looking intently enough at the targets leading edge? That and keeping the eyes glued to it alone and seeing lead peripherally? Hap
     
  16. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    Yeah Hap, and sometimes the crossfiring can be put on hold until a really important shoot like the State Shoot and you are really trying hard to concentrate and the added stress brings the "Crossfire" back at the worst possible time. Been there, done that! The Uni-Dot works for me, others might need the Magic Dot patch of tape on their off shoulder eye lens.
     
  17. snowbird

    snowbird TS Member

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    I had a few guys request this so I tried to shoot some pictures to explain it better. Many of you are SCTP coaches and have to deal with shooters trying to find their dominant eye. I used this method for years and it seems the best way of any methods I have seen for finding your dominant eye. Use a plastic hull cut off at the brass and crimp or a piece of ABS plastic about the same size. A piece of ABS that was about 1 1/2 " longer than a shell might work a little bit better. You glue on a strip of magnet material like your fridge magnets to the bottom of the tube. It works just like the little tube sights that allow you to only see through them with one eye as you are looking down the rib.

    A right handed shooter should put it on the end of the rib and while outside at a gun club or any spot where you can look at some object that is 30 to 35 yards away. The object should be about 30 inches wide too, a circle made from cardboard on a stake is perfect. You close the left eye and look through the tube at the object that is 35 yards away. When you open the left eye you should still be looking right through the tube. While doing this drill you always stay with the far out 35 yard focus all the time, never focusing on the plastic tube just looking through it. The tube almost forms the true pattern size for you at proper shooting distance so it can be used as a teaching aid too.

    I took some pictures of one of these made up that I can e-mail to anyone that is interested.

    Terry.
     
  18. snowbird

    snowbird TS Member

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    If I am looking at the target or out at something at 40 yards I am dominate with my right eye. When I pull my vision in and look at the bead my left eye seems stronger and I start seeing the left side of the gun. It is just my theory but I think lots of people might be different in close like I am creating this confusion. If that is the case and you start bead checking a bit you will crossfire. I think the tube on the end of the rib might be a more accurate way as it is the same distance away as the bead. Some people just can't pull their vision off that bead when test pointing a gun.

    Terry.
     
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