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Turn-of-the-Century Shooters and Shooting

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Drew Hause, Jan 16, 2010.

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  1. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Some here might enjoy this neat 1895-1915 Live Bird and Trap shooting stuff, mostly from the Sporting Life archives. Scroll down to the bottom of the website.
    Might give you something to do until the spring thaw!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ed Y

    Ed Y TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Thought that you were talking about 1999/2000 turn of the century

    Ed Yanchok
     
  3. TIP

    TIP TS Member

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    Is the shooter on the line "Yanchok"/
     
  4. Hitapair

    Hitapair Active Member

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    Interesting, even 114 years ago there must have been a lot of people that thought it was the arrow, not the indian. I'm surprised at the number of Elsies in use.
     
  5. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Almost all the "Top Guns" were representatives for powder, shell, or gun makers in that day including:
    Du Pont’s Schultze, “E. C.", and Ballistite, Laflin & Rand “Infallible” and “Orange Extra”, Kings' Smokeless, Hazard "Blue Ribbon" Smokeless, United States Smokeless Powder Co. “Gold Dust”, Hercules, Robin Hood Powder Co., American Powder Mills “Dead Shot”

    Winchester “Leader” and “Repeater”, Peters “Target” and “Referee”, Union Metallic Cartridge Co. “Arrow” and “Nitro Club”, U.S. Cartridge Co. “The Black Shells”, Austin Cartridge Co.

    Capt. Albert William Money "Blue Rock" used a L.C. Smith at the Penn. State Shoot in 1896, a Greener at the 1897 GAH, a Smith at the New Jersey State Sportsmen's Association Tournament, and a Parker at the New Jersey Handicap, both in Oct. 1897. He shot a Greener in the 1898 GAH and later had two Parker pigeon guns stolen. In 1908 he was shooting for Peters. His son, Harold B. was a Winchester professional using a 1897 Winchester Repeater.

    “Billy” Crosby started with Baker, was shooting a Smith by 1900 but left Hunter Arms for a Parker in 1906 and later used an Ithaca 5E SBT.

    [​IMG]

    Fred Gilbert started with Lefever in 1895, used a Smith in 1896 then switched to Parker in 1902.

    [​IMG]

    Rolla Hiekes was so good he shot in 1895 a Lefever, then a Smith, then a Winchester 1893 Repeater, then a 1897 Repeater (winning the first Grand American at Clay Targets in New York City June 1900), then a Remington pump, then his Smith again taking 3rd place in the 1902 GAH at Live Birds. In 1905 he began shooting a Remington Autoloading Shotgun and was High Professional at the 1906 and 1908 Ohio State Shoots.

    Courtesy of Chris Lien

    [​IMG]


    Charles A. “Sparrow” Young, of Springfield, O., won the International Trapshooting championship at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 with 99x100- gun unknown.
    He won best average at the Mechanicsburg. O., shoot, on May 26, 1898 breaking 204 out of 210 targets using an L. C. Smith.
    He broke 25 straight at the Grand American Handicap at Targets in 1900 when he shot under the nom de plume of “Robin Hood” as a rep for the Robin Hood powder company.
    Later he was a demonstrator for the Baker, and shot as a professional for the Peters Cartridge Company and his Young Repeating Arms Co.
    In 1907 he was shooting a Parker.
    In the 1908 GAH Preliminary Handicap, then using a Winchester 1897 he tied the winning Amateur Score, 95 / 100. At the 1913 GAH he won Professional Championship 197/200 at 22 yards with his Winchester.
    He won the 1926 GAH with an Ithaca SBT.

    W.H. Heer used a Remington 1894 C.E.O. and F.E. but switched to a Remington Pump in 1912.

    [​IMG]

    Mark Arie won the 1912 GAH Doubles Championship and Consolation Handicap and was High Amateur Average for all Single and Double Targets at the 1913 GAH using a Winchester pump. In 1914 he was using the new Marlin hammerless trap gun, D grade (Model 28) which he used to take the Gold in the 1920 Olympic Games in Antwerp, the Grand American Handicap in 1923 and HOA in 23’, 24’, and 32’, and with which he won over $150,000 in prize money over his career.
    He was the first shooter to run 100 straight doubles from scratch when he broke the first 163 in a 200-bird race at the Great Western Handicap at the Denver Municipal TC on July 18, 1926 using a L. C. Smith.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    What the ..? No adjustable ribs, combs, butt plates, How the hell did they expect to hit anything ... lol ... WPT ... (YAC) ...


    I think the guy who is up shooting is taller than Ed Yanchok ...
     
  7. Wolfman

    Wolfman Member

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    That was great - thanks for posting!
     
  8. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting bit of our shooting history, thanks for sharing it!!

    Ed Y. is standing behind the two shooters on line to make the last shot? :)

    Hap
     
  9. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    1902 GAH at Live Birds (Last)

    "This was the first time Harvey McMurchy, of the Hunter Arms Co. ever participated in a Grand American Handicap. He said it was about time the L. C. Smith gun won this event, even if he had to do it, himself. He come all the way from California just to shoot in the race, and brought Phil Bekeart with him; to help win the prize. Both fell down, but "Mac" did not mind it when Hirschy, Spencer and Heikes won in one, two, three order, all using L. C. Smith guns.
    With the record-breaking score of 78 straight kills, Mr. H. C. Hirschy, of Minneapolis, Minn., shooting Winchester Factory Loaded Shells, won the Grand American Handicap at Live Birds for 1902, the first prize of $688 and a valuable silver trophy. During the tournament Mr. Hirschy shot at 102 birds, shooting through the entire week without a miss, a record never before equaled in this great shoot. He used an L. C. Smith gun, 3 1/4 drams Hazard smokeless, 1 1/4 oz. No. 7 chilled shot in Winchester factory-loaded Pigeon shells."

    "Rolla Heikes, of Dayton, O., winner of third place, was using an L. C. Smith gun, 3 1/4 drams, E. C. powder, 1 1/4 oz. No. 7 chilled shot in U. M. C. Arrow shells."

    1906 GAH

    “Mr F. E. Rogers, of St. Louis, Mo., on the 17-yard mark, won the seventh Grand American Handicap, at Indianapolis Ind. June 21 1906, with the score of 94 out of 100 targets, in a gale of wind with a Smith.”

    [​IMG]

    1911 GAH

    Harvey Dixon, amateur of Oronogo, Mo., won the Grand American Handicap on the third day with a score of 99 from 20 yards.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Outing: Sport, Adventure, Travel, Fiction 1889


    http://books.google.com/books?id=1BugAAAAMAAJ&source=gbs_navlinks_s


    p. 568


    Al. Bandle, of Cincinnati, on Christmas Day defeated the famous shot, Captain A. H. Bogardus, by killing 100 live birds straight to the Captain's equally remarkable record of 95.


    Bogardus shot a 12-gauge L.C. Smith gun, hammerless, 7 lbs. 12 oz. weight and shot 4 drams American wood powder in his first barrel, 1 1/4 oz. No. 8 shot in first and 1 1/4 oz. No. 7 in second, backed up with 3 1/4 drams Laflin and Rand Orange Lightning powder.


    Bandle shot the same make of gun, 10 gauge, and used, first barrel, four drams wood powder, second, four drams Laflin and Rand "F. F. F. extra" powder, No. 7 shot.
     
  11. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Added a few more docs :)

    Turn-of-the-Century Shooters and Shooting


    Shooting Flying Classics

    American Sporting Magazine Links

    History of Trap Shooting

    Top Guns at the Traps


    Trapshooting Trade and Advertising

    Shotgun and Shooting Wisdom

    Turn-of-the-Century Shotshells

    Turn-of-the-Century Gun Mount

    Jack Fanning's Tips to Trapshooters

    Ladies Afield and at the Traps


    Click on the link above then scroll down
     
  12. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Interesting how Iowa and Midwestern shooters dominated the traps at the turn-of-the-century


    Iowa -
    Fred Gilbert "The Phantom of Spirit Lake",
    Charles Grimm,
    Charles "Iowa Indian" Budd,
    William Ridley,
    Joe Kautzky,
    William Hoon


    Nebraska -
    Frank Parmalee,
    George Maxwell,
    William Veach,


    Kansas -
    William Heer,
    Ed O'Brien


    Missouri -
    J.A.R. Elliott (born in New York),
    Charles Spencer,
    S.A. Huntley,
    Harvey Dixon


    Illinois -
    Captain Adam H. Bogardus (Born in New York),
    "Doc" Carver "The Evil Spirit of the Plains",
    W.R. Crosby (born in New York),
    Tom Marshall,
    J.R. Graham,
    F.G. Bills,
    Homer Clark,
    Bart Lewis,
    Mark Arie

    I'm sure I missed a couple.
     
  13. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    My vote for the Top Gun of 1895-1912 goes to Fred Gilbert, with J.A.R. Elliott, Rolla Hiekes, and William Crosby a close second.

    He was the dominant shooter after winning the Du Pont World's Pigeon Champion in 1895 and the “E.C.” Inanimate Target Championship in 1896.

    http://www.la84foundation.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1897/VOL_30_NO_06/SL3006019.pdf

    Sporting Life Dec. 18, 1897
    "J. A. R. Elliott, of Kansas City, defeated Fred Gilbert, of Spirit Lake, Ia., for the DuPont trophy at Chicago, shooting at 100 birds, on Dec. 9; each killed 93 and shot off the tie on the following day. Elliott killed 25 straight, and won, as Gilbert lost two birds. This is the first big match Elliott ever won on Chicago grounds. The DuPont trophy was won by Gilbert from Elliott at Kansas City last month, and the Kansas City man now holds one
    of the live bird championship trophies.
    Fred Gilbert still retains the Kansas City "Star" Cup, and Rolla Heikes holds the Cast Iron Medal.
    The question is: Which one of these men is entitled to the title of champion live bird shot of America?"


    Gilbert's average for all the years between 1897 and 1918 was 94.92 per cent on a total of 145,895 targets. For eight out of the eleven years between 1901 and 1911 he held the high average in either singles or doubles, this despite severe illnesses in 1906 and 1910.

    [​IMG]

    In 1919 Gilbert broke a world’s record of 591 straight targets.

    Anyone better?
     
  14. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    This is pretty good :)

    Jan. 2 1897


    Charles Grimm defeats Doc Carver in Chicago for the “Cast Iron Metal”
    Grimm used a 12-bore L. C. Smith gun, 7 3/4 pounds, 3 3/4 drams Schultze, 1 1/4 ounce No. 7 shot, in U. M. C. Trap shell.
    Carver used a 12-bore Cashmore gun, 8 pounds weight, 4 drams of Carver powder, 1 1/4 No. 7 shot, in U. M. C. Trap shells.


    Letter from Carver re: J. “147” L. Winston, “The Wizard of the West”, St. Louis representing Austin Powder Co. Jan. 30 1897


    Dr. W. F. Carver wrote a funny letter in a Chicago journal last week, in which he states that Winston could not kill good birds because he had a cheap American machine made gun, and if "147" had used the same kind of imported gun that he did the matches would have been closer. Will Dr. W. F. Carver kindly explain why Charles Grimm, using the same kind of machine made gun as Winston did, managed to kill 98 out of 100 live birds and take the "Cast Iron Medal" away from him? In this match Grimm used the American machine made L. C. Smith gun, while Carver used an imported gun that he advertises free when he gets a chance. Now if Carver’s gun is so much better than Grimm’s why did he not kill more birds? or was it because the cashless gun was only good on hard, fast zig-zig screamers, and not adapted for soft easy duffer birds? The “Evil Spirit” had better think again.
     
  15. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    That's alot of targets!

    The Sportsman’s Gazetteer 1878
    http://books.google.com/books?id=bowCAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA680&dq=%22Williams+%26+Powell%22+gunmaker&cd=8#v=onepage&q=&f=false


    BOHEMIAN GLASS WORKS, 214 Pearl Street, New York.
    Paine's Patent Feather-filled Glass Ball.


    Dealers and Consumers will notice that we have made a sweeping reduction in the price of this ball, placing it within the reach of all. Since our late reduction in the price, our sales have averaged 30,000 per day.
    The Patent Feather-filled is cheaper than any uniform ball in the market. Don't buy or shoot inferior balls when you can have almost the same pleasure with the Paine ball as if you were shooting at a living bird.
    All corrugated or rough glass balls have proved to be a failure.
     
  16. trench12

    trench12 TS Member

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    here's another one for ya
     
  17. trench12

    trench12 TS Member

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    one more
     
  18. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Thanks trench!

    July 13 Sporting Life


    http://www.la84foundation.org/SportsLibrary/SportingLife/1912/VOL_59_NO_19/SL5919025.pdf


    Victory of United States Makes Clean Sweep in Trap Shooting


    Glory for American Gun, Shell and Powder Makers


    Stockholm, Sweden, July 6. Special Cablegram to "Sporting Life."


    After a three days contest against his American teammates, and the pick of the world’s competitors from every nation of Europe, Jay R. Graham, if Long Lake, Ills., representing the Chicago A.A., won the Olympic individual trap shooting championship at clay targets on July 4. Graham fittingly celebrated America’s natal day by finishing the third stage of the shooting with an aggregate score of 96 out of 100 targets. Behind him came Goelden, of Germany who had made a hard race throughout. In third place was Blau, of Russia, who just beat out several American shots.


    Graham’s victory made his second triumph of the Olympic games. The Illinois amateur had already made the high individual score of the contests in the team race early in the week when America’s team, consisting of Graham, W. Billings, R. L. Spotts, J. A. Hendrickon, Frank Hall and Dr. F. Gleason, had won the Olympic team championship. On that occasion Graham scored 94 out of 100. In the individual championship, Graham improved his shooting considerably. The event stretched over three days, which hampered Graham and prevented him from getting one of his famous long runs.


    The first stage of the shooting was on July 2. Conditions called for 20 targets in two rounds. In this Graham tied with Dr. Gleason and two Germans, Goelden and Zeidlitz, each breaking 19 targets. Thirty-six shooters broke 15 or better and were eligible for the second stage which was shot on July 3. This stage was at 30 targets. Graham and Gleason went into the lead, each breaking 28 out of 30 and setting their total at 47 out of 60. Goelden only broke 25 and dropped back to third with a total of 44. On Independence Day the final stage was shot and Graham got into the swing, scoring 49 out of 50. He was forced to do his best because the German, Goelden, proved a good competitor, getting his 50 straight and making his total 94. Dr. Gleason fell off and Blau nosed him out with 91. The first big double victory for the American team was the subject of rejoicing among the big attendance of American spectators and athletes, and a big banquet was held on
    he evening of the Fourth of July.


    THE AMERICAN TRAP SHOOTERS were the guests of honor and they were raised by the representatives of every nation. Palmer, of the Great Britain team, in his speech, said the American team is unquestionably the finest in the world and added that they won the clay target competition on merit. Manader, a well-known English shot, said that Graham is the finest individual shot he has ever seen.


    In accomplishing his great victory Graham used Du Pont powder, a Remington pump gun and U. M. C. shells. All the Americans used Du Pont powder in the team race and American guns and Remington-U. M. C. shells.
     
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