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Truck tires-is age a factor re: safety ?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by amboy49, Dec 15, 2012.

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  1. amboy49

    amboy49 Well-Known Member

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    My 4 wheel drive Z71 Chevrolet truck is a 1997. As evidenced by the odometer reading of 85,000 miles, I don't drive it a lot. The miles on it are mostly trips out west to hunt. The BF Goodrich M&S tires are now at least 10 years old. Is there a point where tires should be replaced due to age ? The tread is still reasonably good. I'm mostly concerned about driving interstate speeds during hot weather.
     
  2. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    The emerging consensus is that yes, tires have a "shelf life" regardless of mileage.
     
  3. Eric Mirosavich

    Eric Mirosavich Member

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    I would love to have that truck! Please PM me if and when you're interested in selling. It's so tough to find a 97 or 98 with that mileage!
     
  4. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    I won't go over six years on tires for my vehicles even if the tread if 50% or better. My truck is pretty much just used to tow and I end up changing the tires every 5 years no more than 6, "just because." I will have a clean concious and will be able to look myself in the mirror and anyone else in the face If I get into a tire related catastrophic incident. The incident won't be because the tires were too "old."

    Now if it is a farm truck, driven at low speeds, not on freeways, etc... Drive them babies until you see steel cords. LOL...

    Make sure when you are buying tires say from SAM'S Club or whatever that the tires are not already a year or two old. Sometimes tires are cheaper because in theory they only have 3 real "safe" years left in them.

    Everyone's personal decision, but I am not going to be driving 70 mph down the road with my family in the vehicle with 5,6, year or older tires regardless of tread. I believe D.O.T., recommends tires be inspected at 5 years or so and changed no matter what by ten years. I am conservative on this because for me saving $500.00 isn't worth the chance of an accident that could hurt me, my buddy, or cause me to swerve and run someone else off the road, etc...

    Mash the above link to read the manufacture date on tires sold in the United States.
     
  5. emm2

    emm2 Member

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    Manufacturers don't recommend running tires that are over 7 years old. The last 2 digits of the DOT number is the year they were made.
     
  6. cbxchris

    cbxchris Active Member

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    I found out what 8 year old tires on a class A motorhome do when coming back from a shoot.....BLOW OUT. Those tires had only 20K on them and were visibly perfect. That was 4000 bucks well spent in my book replacing them.
     
  7. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    UV light and Oxygen both degrade the rubber - starts the second the tires leave the molds.

    Depending on the type and brand they may last longer or shorter lengths of time, but they do have a shelf life.

    Never heard the 7 year rule - does kind of make sense.

    We always looked for the 'dry rot' or cracking in the side wall as the indicator of imminent failure.
     
  8. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Covering RV tires while unused helps. In town, visual check is good. If you drive at highway speeds, and most every one does at one time or another Iwould stretch the Mfr reccomendation a little. After all, they do want you to buy more tires than you need.

    HM
     
  9. Eriehunter

    Eriehunter TS Member

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    YES !!!!!!!! age is a factor, the number I remember from NHTSA was 5 years. An old tire can be just as dangerous as an underinflated tire. Remember the Ford Explorer roll over problem..... Get rid of those old tires. Especially if the tires have been sitting outside in the sun, life may be less than 5 yrs.
     
  10. mcneeley5

    mcneeley5 Member

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    I had to replace a full set of Michelins on my Army son's truck. Lots of tread depth but alligatored to the point of un-safe. Only four seasons old. The salesman at Sears said that Michelins do that a lot here in AZ.
     
  11. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what they recommend but your safety is riding on those tires. I wouldn't risk it. If you are asking then you are worried. As someone who drives commercial trucks for a living, you can't predict blow outs as I've had brand new(no re-treads) tires go not a 100 miles from the tire shop. That said, you can do your part by keeping good rubber on the vehicle.

    Twice I have had steer tires go on a big truck. That is a butt puckering profanity filled experience you will never want to do again.
     
  12. daddiooo

    daddiooo TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Lost a left front steer tire on a 359 Peterbilt @ 80+ mph in West Texas a few
    years back. Managed to keep it upright and on the highway...... but had to throw that underwear away.
     
  13. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    The RMA and the tire manufactures have decided that 6 yrs of age is as old as tires should be. weather in use or not, tires wear from ilage and age the casings fatigue and the rubber becomes brittle with age leading to failure. The major tire suppliers warranty their products for milage but only for 6 years from date of mfg, found in the dot number on the side wall. Get rid of those old tirs.
     
  14. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    I live in Arizona and due to the heat and high speed limits I change the tires on my Truck between 25 and 30 thousand miles because like "meneeley5" said they start to deteriorate ... There is still a lot of tread left but I don't trust them and I don't want any tire problems out in the middle of the desert on a hot day, so its kind of like my insuance policy though things can still happen ... I run Bridgestones or Generals and they are not cheap, but worth it ... I have a Buddy who uses my old tires on his trailer, can't beat the price (Free) ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  15. Bvr Tail

    Bvr Tail Well-Known Member

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    Years ago(about 40-45), a friend worked in a tire store that had a large overhead warehouse.

    Once while up there just looking around, he found quite a few old tires, wrapped in paper with the size and brand written on the outside labels.

    He asked the owner about them, and was told they were here when he bought the place, and if he wanted them he could have them.

    He and I loaded them all up, wrote down all the information, and proceeded to ask around about selling them.

    Many old car buffs were interested so we sold one set to a man with an older Buick Roadmaster.

    His only question was if they were still good.

    We mounted one tire for him, placed it in the truck tire cage, and filled it to about 120 lbs. of air, then stood back.

    We saw no cracks, or problems, so we let the air out, dismounted it and looked it over inside and out. We still saw no problems, and let him make the decision.

    He chose to keep them, and helped us sell all of them to a classic car club.

    A couple of young men made some good money that summer.
     
  16. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Had a 79' vette that I sold this year. I put new tires on it before I sold it.
    The previous tires were new in 83'. Yes they were 29 years old. I put a whopping 7,000 miles on that car in 29 years. It was stored covered, and inside when we didn't drive it.

    My dealer said he thought the old tires were a few years old last year when I had it serviced.

    For liability reasons and sale value, I felt it was necessary to change the tires before I sold it.
     
  17. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    like CBX chris, I had blowouts on tires that were old but still looked new. It was on a camper trailer that was stored inside the barn for about 10 years. It was up on jacks so the tires were not even on the ground. I checked the bearing grease, it was clean and looked good and full. Aired up the tires and left on vacation. In the next 2000 miles I had 3 blowouts. When the 3rd tire blew I just replaced both of the old ones. The guy was really glad to have 4 new tires. I would drive old ones around town, but who wants to waste 3 days of your vacation sitting in tire shops?
     
  18. aabradley82

    aabradley82 TS Member

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    I learned my lesson on old tires. 5 years and gone for me. Too many blowouts with old to fool with. Scariest one for me was on a steer tire on a freightliner. 600 for a new tire on the side of road, then about 2500 for hood and fairing repair.
     
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