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Tru-Oil Vs. Tung Oil Vs. Linseed Oil

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by tkleinma, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. tkleinma

    tkleinma Member

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    I have refinished several stocks using Casey's Tru-Oil and I have been very pleased with the results. But in search of continuous improvement, I am considering other alternatives such at Tung Oil and Linseed Oil.

    What are your thoughts?

    Thank you.

    Todd
     
  2. MIDOHHNTR

    MIDOHHNTR TS Member

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    I have used Tru-Oil and Tung oil in the past with great results, but my understanding with linseed oil is that it never dries.
    I have also used oil based polyurethane as well with good results.
     
  3. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    A 'hand rubbed oil finish' will give the nicest finish possible - it is how fine English shotguns have always been finished.

    It involves boiled linseed oil, some thinner, a wax (typically carnauba) and often Japan drier. The oil penetrates the wood, the wax seals it and fills the voids. MANY coats are needed - the more coats and the more it is rubbed the more highly polished the finish.

    It takes time - initially you can typically apply two coats per day - as you progress drying time goes up. Not unusual to see 30 or 50 coats, and even more.
     
  4. Big Iron

    Big Iron Member

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    I have always used Tru-Oil to finish my stocks. Working on a Model 12 right now with a great piece of wood.
    I would be interested in trying the linseed oil on the next project. Thanks for the info
     
  5. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Big Iron,

    I can send some to my son for you to try...
     
  6. Big Iron

    Big Iron Member

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    That would be much appreciated I would love to try it.
     
  7. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Tung oil with about 15% Japan dryer. 8-10 coats. Rub a coat in, let set 30 minutes, rub the excess of. Let the stock set for 24hrs and do it again. keep it up until all the pores are filled. Wax, and you get a beautiful finish that is tuff.
     
    Dustin Flattum thanked this.
  8. Gamba Man

    Gamba Man Active Member

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    I use a gel chemical stripper (Circa 1850), then neutralize with thinner and final wash with acetone.
    I start sanding with 150 grit papers..

    Before I go to a finer paper I use whiting/acetone mix and apply it to the stock with an acid brush to absorb any excess oils in the stock, a few applications usually does it... then continue sanding 220/320/400 wiskering between coats (using hot iron and wet cloth to raise any dents), use epoxy to fill any voids or damage.

    Using an acid brush apply a hot application of Linseed Oil (1\2 cup) with a tablespoon of Japan Dryer and turpentine, (This initial coat of ' hot ' oil will penetrate the stock deeply ... let sit an hour then wipe off , and repeat once more) ... let the stock dry for two weeks

    Mask off checkering at this point

    Use True-Oil to fill pores (approx 8 coats) and let finish dry and harden for two weeks,...(rub in true-oil thinly and smear with your fingers until it feels dry).

    Remove masking tape off checkering,

    Cut down finish to bare wood using 400 wet/dry paper making sure to remove all traces of True Oil from the surface.
    Apply Linseed oil weekly (hand rub) .... then wet sanding with Linseed oil every 4'th week between hand rubbing coats going from 600/800/1000/1200/1500/2000 wet/dry paper
    ....example
    week 1 - hand rub with Linseed oil
    week 2 - hand rub with Linseed oil
    week 3 - hand rub with Linseed oil
    week 4- wet sand with Linseed oil 600 grit

    week 5 -hand rub with Linseed oil
    week 6 -hand rub with Linseed oil
    week 7 -hand rub with Linseed oil
    week 8 - wet sand with Linseed oil 800 grit
    ...... and continue down to 2000 grit

    Rechecker at this point, and brush in two coats of Linseed oil into checkering

    Let stand for a few weeks and apply two coats of wax.... long process (8 months)
     
    trapp2012 thanked this.
  9. semperfi909

    semperfi909 Well-Known Member

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    Save your time, money, and peace of mind and NEVER go down the path of "tradition". Old finishes were what they were because there was nothing better. This is the 21stCentury and there is no more need to subject yourself to linseed and tung than there is to cook over a camp fire and shoot muzzle loaders.

    You've used TrueOil - why would you bother with less? Get a copy of Gun Stock Finishing and Care by Newell and you'll never look back.

    Not JMO - a simple fact
     
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  10. Jason Stagner

    Jason Stagner Member

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    I use boiled linseed oil / rejuvenate oil mixture but semperfi does have a point
     
  11. Cowboy Rick

    Cowboy Rick Active Member

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    I have used ALL of them...... Tru oil cut with Japan Dryer is the BEST.
    Raise any dents then start wet sanding the Tru Oil with 200 grit wet/dry sand
    paper. After a few coats go to 400 grit and even 600. I use a water based stain
    before the finishes (Winchester Red) if it is a pre 64 Winchester.
     
  12. Jaxshooter

    Jaxshooter Active Member

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    The wiping type of polyurethane will also give an excellent waterproof finish that closely resembles hand rubbed oil finishes but is much more durable. Sand or steel wool between coats. Very easy to produce a high gloss or satin finish.
     
  13. marsingbob

    marsingbob Active Member

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    All of the above finishes and a lot of others will produce good or great results if used carefully and patiently. I think most professionals today have moved to some type of polyurethane or similar hard, tough, waterproof finish as a base coat an use it to fill pores. It is followed by either the same finish or an oil type finish rubbed in in very fine coats. I cannot seem to get the results I want with truoil, but some use it to get a great finish. It tends to be pretty much like varnish when I try to use it.
     
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  14. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Banned User Banned

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    More than likely a urethane finish of some sort for the deep, clear finish coat, but not a polyurethane. There is a difference, especially the two part versions. It is a matter of time and efficiency with the professionals, and time and patience with the DIY. I get impatient with the oils, but I do like the way it enhances the wood grain..
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2017
  15. redbone99

    redbone99 Member

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  16. redbone99

    redbone99 Member

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    What is Japan Dryer? Is this aterm for lacquer thinner? Thanks,Dave
     
  17. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Japan Drier is added to finishes to speed the drying process - really helps to set linseed oil.
     
  18. Readgriff

    Readgriff Member

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    Never used Japan drier with Tru Oil.
    I'm in the process of redoing a sweet right now will have to give it a try.
     
  19. stockmaker12

    stockmaker12 Banned User Banned

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    ranch23 thanked this.
  20. russde

    russde TS Member

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    Tru-oil is raw linseed oil, boiled linseed oil, and mineral spirits. Some folks think that it might also contain some actual varnish (the msds is rather vague), so your results aren't surprising.

    Pro Custom Oil is mainly Tung oil, dearomatized aliphatic hydrocarbon, and naptha.

    Linseed and tung oil do not penetrate wood very well; these oil hybrid finishes use naptha and mineral spirits to both encourage quicker drying and to thin the oil to penetrate somewhat better. But they still are simply oil finishes and remarkably similar.