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Trapshooting pictures?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by bodybuilder, Jul 2, 2008.

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  1. bodybuilder

    bodybuilder TS Member

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    I Just bought a new camera with several lenses, I've been trying to get the pictures of the target being broken but without much success. Can someone tell me how they get those kind of pictures? Lens, shutter speed, film speed? Thanks
     
  2. Beacon

    Beacon TS Member

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    I have had a number of different cameras and the only two I have ever been able to get those type of 'high speed' pictures with are my Canon Rebels. One is digital and the other is not. They both have a specific setting for high speed photos. I have been successful with both of them as long as the autofocus is not on regardless of what the lens is.
     
  3. littlebear

    littlebear TS Member

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    Targetmaster,
    You said you have several lenses, this leads me to believe you have a digital SLR. If that is the case you should be able to capture the target breaking. I would not try to zoom into just the target. Preset your focus to the approx distance of the target but use a wide field of view. It may take several tries but in the digital world that is not a problem. Also set the quality level as high as possible, that way you can zoom and crop in your computer.
     
  4. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    DTD has good advice but you could also set the trap machine to not oscillate, set the camera up to cover the area where birds are being broken every time, and use a narrower field of view, semi telephoto, looking over the shooter's shoulder. I'd have it on a tripod and use a cable release then take plenty of pictures timing your release as best as you can. This would work with either digital or film. Film? I'd use high speed film, preset focus distance and at least mid range f stop (f8 or 11) for increased depth of field and still have fast shutter speed. I can see where I'd try it a 1/2 dozen times before I got the film, shutter, f stop, et alii all good.....Bob Dodd
     
  5. bodybuilder

    bodybuilder TS Member

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    Its not digital, It uses regular film 35mm. It is a minolta maxxum stsi, It has 70-300 1:4-5.6, 28-80, 28-90 lenses. Does this help? I'm still learning and don't understand all of it. Thanks
     
  6. mudbug

    mudbug TS Member

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    Rargetmaster, Plerase send me your e-mail addy and I will send you a pdf file of your camera. Be well, Milt
     
  7. mudbug

    mudbug TS Member

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    sorry - I spell better than I type...........
     
  8. bodybuilder

    bodybuilder TS Member

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    Milt, Thanks for your help! I tried sending my e-mail to yours but it came back so I'll Just give you mine gwlowe25271@yahoo.com Thanks again!!!
     
  9. BMC

    BMC Member

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    Targetmaster, strap on your 70-300, set your capture mode to Aperature Priority (A)on the dial. If you can't figure out the settings on the dail (I think you have to push down the Func button while scrolling on that model), then select the programmed mode for sports (picture of guy running) above your LCD. In either case you will want to use an aperature around F5.6 to F8 to increase your shutter speed. I have found that ideally the best captures of a target beginning to shatter or ink ball is with a shutter speed above 500. Since your camera is film, you will probably need to use ASA200 film, depending on lighting. The more light, the better the results.
    In an ideal controlled situation, have the trap set to straight away and put the shooter on post 2. Stand about 25 feet behind him, slightly quartered to the center (post line 3) and pre-focus on the house or the furthest edge of the house and lock the focus by half pressing the shutter release button. It helps if you are familiar with the shooters shoot speed because you want to pull your trigger when he pulls his. So you need to "shoot" the target just like you were shooting it yourself with your trap gun.
    You can improve your odds by setting your frame capture to continuous where you can fire off several frames and hope to have one in the mix that you like. Remember this. If you pull your trigger in the instant you see the target break, you are generally too late and just end up with pieces of the target. A clear sky with the sun to your back is the best situation.
    The nice thing about using a DSLR over film is you can go in and do a 100% crop on the breaking target and get really close to it, seeing the detail up close.
     
  10. Rick Jordon

    Rick Jordon TS Member

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    targetmaster - it ain't easy. I've been trying, and failing a lot.

    The suggestion about locking the trap and working with one shooter is excellent. In this setup you'll probably want to use a tripod as well, it helps if you have the camera locked in on the "hit zone."

    You're also going to have to chose your background carefully. You might be able to get a perfect shot of a break, but without contrast to the background your pic will look bland.

    You'll probably need 1/2000th of a second or faster shutter speed to capture a really crisp break. This is going to be a competing concern with aperture, because you're also going to want an aperture as small as possible to increase depth of field.


    Here's a few samples of handheld trys. I'm still working on finding a trap field near me with a really good background for the tripod and locked trap throw shots.



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  11. BMC

    BMC Member

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    Here are a few I took. One showing a good break and one lucky catch of the shot cloud approaching the target.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  12. BMC

    BMC Member

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    LOL John, nope, its actually Jack Jackson. He shoots a super slow (lite) load which is why I think it was easier to capture that shot cloud.
     
  13. tachyon

    tachyon Member

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    Digital SLR (Nikon), 80-200mm lens, nice sunny day, Vandalia Ohio last Grand. Get in sync with the timing of the shooter (easy for me since I coach these girls all year). Manual focus, near the break point. F11 gave enough depth of field so both the shooter and the target are in Ok focus. You can see the wad in this shot.

    [​IMG]

    inkball

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    [​IMG]
     
  14. mono1393

    mono1393 Member

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  15. at_trap_89

    at_trap_89 TS Member

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    Rather than having to lock a trap and have someone shoot from a certain post, one could set up behind a squad shooting doubles...stay behind either 1 or 2, or 3 or 5...and photograph the shooter you're behind taking the first bird, which 99% of the time is their straight-away. Easiest way for a perfect photo set-up. Use the 70-300mm lens and the setting on your camera that takes multiple frames per second...press that shutter just after they call pull.. Its not all luck.
     
  16. The Rock

    The Rock Active Member

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    Cheap digital Fuji Fine Pix. Had to take about eight pics to get this one.

    Rock

    Jim
     
  17. Big Al 29

    Big Al 29 TS Member

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    Looks like shot would rain down on the porta-potty in that last picture. Funny how pictures can distort the depth of an area.
     
  18. The Rock

    The Rock Active Member

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    This was the last shoot at Vandalia. It is a lot farther away than it appears. The fence is over 100 yards away.

    Rock

    Jim
     
  19. welderman

    welderman TS Member

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    Nice photos. Here is one you won't see every day. The target is beginning to come apart. The lines are the the distance a piece of shot has travelled in 1/10,000 of a second which was the exposure time for this picture.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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    "Welderman", time to upload that video you took, maybe to Youtube?? Frank
     
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