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Trapshooting in Great Depression?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by BIGbill, Nov 25, 2007.

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  1. BIGbill

    BIGbill TS Member

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    Some people can always afford to go shooting. 15k guns, 500k RVs, they still come.
     
  2. angryman7

    angryman7 TS Member

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    not as we knew it. i say knew because it already is different. not whining, just it's not as well attended as it was. most people say they can't afford to shoot as much anymore. hobbies are, or should be the first sacrifice when things are rough.
     
  3. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Either that...or get hobbies that don't cost so much (ie, consume so much material each time participated in...)
     
  4. quicky

    quicky Member

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    I know that there are many more expenses to shooting than just the shot problem, but I was lying in bed this AM and figuring just how much more I was going to spend on higher priced reloads. It figures out to about $200 extra for 3500 shots with $40 dollar shot. That is a little less than 5 hours O.T. at my place of employment. In 2007 thus far I have refused about 400 hours of O.T. while working about 170. I guess you can deduce where I am going with this. Working-over less than one shift will allow me to shoot 3500 rounds without any difference in the 'bottom line' of the household finances. Also, by going to Priceline I have been able to save enough on hotels to make up for the price of fuel. Bottom line? If we think in the 'how can I afford to do this' mode rather than in the 'I can't afford to do it' mode we can find ways to be frugal and still enjoy the things we love to do. The 'how can I' mode creates thought processes which can move us forward while the 'I can't' tends to close our minds to possibilities. So, I am going to shoot just much as last year (11K+) and do so with about 20 extra hours of overtime. How about them apples? See ya, Quicky
     
  5. Ron Frazier

    Ron Frazier TS Member

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    Bless you Quickie! You are the best! It's your attitude that will keep trapshooting alive for the next generation. None of this woe is me stuff. It may get a lot tougher for all of us but we will survive! Thank you!
     
  6. Big Heap

    Big Heap TS Member

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    The only people who made $240 in three hours during the Great Depression were counterfeiters.

    Predictions of another depression have been watching to much liberal, democrat, CNN analysis.
     
  7. quicky

    quicky Member

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    Trapshooter421...If you're retired how about a little bit of a job on the side? I aerate lawns in the spring and have 3 kids working for me as well. I also make a few dollars each winter trapping pigeons, enough to allow me to attend a couple live bird shoots each year. I also make and market a very good beaver lure for trapping beaver. It is called Sweetwater Flattail and you can get some for yourself through Minnesota Trapline Products. This in addition to my regular job as a machinist (36 yrs. and just learning how!). What I am saying is that we tend to close our minds by saying "I can't" followed by whatever it is we choose not to be able to do. Come on..chin up and lets get a little more positive! Quicky
     
  8. RLC323

    RLC323 Member

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    I don't think there was much Trapshooting going on around here. My late Grandfather used to tell a story of going duck hunting during the worst of the depression. He went with five shells (all he could afford) and came home with four ducks. He said that that when he missed that single duck he was nearly sick to his stomach, but it was his only miss and he took the four he killed home for the family. Two for supper and two to for Grandma to cold-pack into mason jars. Talk about shooting under pressure!
     
  9. quicky

    quicky Member

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    Okay, the rose-colored glasses are off. I mentioned that a retiree may get a part time job to help offset the price of fuel and shot and wads and targets. I really wasn't thinking of a Walmart greeter job with inflexible hours, etc. Something that may work well as a part time job with hours of your own making would involve getting a high-pressure steam washer on a trailer and contracting to clean oil and other residue from driveways and parking lots. Use a bio-degradeable soap and advertise it as such, form a simple LLC and arrange work around your schedule. If things get too busy you may have to employ someone so you have time to shoot with all your new disposable income!

    We can all use our imagination to come up with some small niche which can be filled profitably. You might be able to use a washer on a contract basis at a truck stop for cleaning some of the big rigs. Also graffiti removal and old peeled paint without the steam could be viable. Put on the old thinking cap here, being retired doesn't mean being sedentary. Quicky
     
  10. hreinke

    hreinke TS Member

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    Quicky. I wouldn't mine plying my trade on a small time basic but I am on disability and cannot walk more than 50 feet with out having to rest. I guess being in a car plant for 33 years as a toolmaker and sucking in all thoughs wonderful fumes had a negitive effect on my body,you know stuff like cancer, sugar,lose of half a lung.People like me can't just jump up and find a job they can handle. But I got my wife still working,and she still wants me to shoot,so I try to help her as much as I can.
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Quicky- I am very favorably impressed with both your attitude and work ethic. If you would ever want to consider moving South to Virginia, you would have a job and a personal key to a trap club.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. BIGDON

    BIGDON Well-Known Member

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    Quick; I too admire your attitude and logic. But unfortunately it's not what some of these want to hear. "Where there is a will there is a way"

    Great post.

    Don
     
  13. quicky

    quicky Member

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    Another odd job nobody thinks much about is cleaning windows. There is a minimal investment in equipment and it is relatively simple to schedule your work around shooting. One fellow I know supported his young family doing this while he went to college. Some days he made upwards of $300 for less than 8 hours of work. Keep in mind he worked hard and he was young. However, all we were looking for here was a way to offset the increased cost of shot, primers and wads. $100/week would go a long way in doing so. Squeegees, soap and a couple good quality ladders and a pickup with a rack or trailer would do the hauling chore. A good window washer is really fast and does nice work. No streaks either.

    I know some might feel that kind of work is demeaning but I beg to differ. Any honest job well done, from mowing a lawn to sending a rocket into orbit, is very worthwhile and self-satisfying. Hope all works out, Quicky
     
  14. Tripod

    Tripod Well-Known Member

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    Iowa man!!
    I have a retired school teacher friend that mows yards around a small resort type area. He said he and his wife/daughter make $40,000 a season. I know that would be a lot of work with trimming and such, but the opportunity is there
     
  15. quicky

    quicky Member

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    I don't know how, but the price of raw lead seems to be falling somewhat. I'm all for that. Australia will be opening a mine in mid-summer if I understand correctly which should put a little downward pressure on lead prices.

    One of the concepts I have tried to teach my own children and the Scout troop I used to be scout master of is a concept called 'opportunity' costs. For instance, there is a cost associated with watching television. That cost is the opportunity lost to do something else with the time spent watching the tube. For instance, is there a more profitable way in which to spend your time? It is really interesting to re-evaluate our actions with the opportunity cost paradigm. If done honestly we may decide that there are some things we would rather not do in lieu of some other thing.

    For instance, I really like to shoot marathon targets. There is a lot of shooting in a relatively short space of time. I really like to shoot. I like to B.S. as much as the next guy, but I have a lot of irons in the fire and sometimes it seems as if I am wasting other opportunities if a shoot drags out for a long time. So, I try to find other things to do if there is a 200 target day and a lot of dead time. I have even hauled an aerator to a different town and knocked on doors and aerated a couple lawns between hundreds or after hundreds if faced with the prospect of sitting in a motel room. That $ will allow me to play all the options the next day if I wish to do so.

    I also like to read, and would like to recommend a book that has really affected my thinking. It is by Thomas Sowell and is called Basic Economics. A couple things which caught my eye about the 'good old days' are that 1) in New York City in 1896 there were 4 private bathtubs per 100,000 residents, and, 2) That Henry Ford's Model A was hailed as the most environmentally friendly device ever produced by the city of Chicago. Think of the 100,000 lbs. of horse manure that needed hauled away EACH DAY and the 10,000 horse carcasses needing disposed of each year in that 1 city. Think of the disease, especially encephalitis, which ran their courses. Think of 6 and 7 story tall livery stables in London. I think the nostalgia of the 'good old days' may well be displaced or mistaken.

    That is the end of this missive, I've bloviated long enough. Quicky
     
  16. richrob

    richrob TS Member

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    I agree with the work a little more to play a little more attitude. But not all of us have that option. I start my job January 7th, and becuase Im an engineer I will be on salary, I can work all I want and get paid the same.

    Thankfully I still have sidework at the family company, but that is going into paying off a new car and saving for a home.

    Since I wont get paid overtime, I might as well get home as quick as possible and work on the shotmaker. - Rich
     
  17. richrob

    richrob TS Member

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    I guess that came off the wrong way. Its not that I dont intend on doing my job, but staying for voluntary overtime would really have no benefit. I can show my worth to the comapny during normal work hours. I make more money working with my father, but the new job will have insurance, retirement and other benefits.

    I chose to be a mechanical engineer because I enjoy that type of work and because I know later in life Im not gonna want to do manual work for my pay check.

    I turned down a union job to be an operator in a nuclear power plant because I felt it was kinda silly to work so hard for a degree and not use it. Also, for some personal reasons I am not a huge supporter of unions or their ways of conducting business.

    Right now that extra time would be better served building the family business or on some hobbies that have a high intrinsic value. -Rich
     
  18. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Quicky,
    It's people like you who have made this country great! We need more people like you to keep it great. You'd also enjoy reading Applied Economics by the same author.
    Cesar
     
  19. quicky

    quicky Member

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    Hello Chichay: Applied Economics was good but somewhat repetitive. I am now reading A New History of the Great Depression by Amity Shlaes and a great book by E. L. Kersten called The Art of Demotivation. He is the co-founder of Despair, inc. and has some great demotivational calendars. Try despair.com (I think that is close, Google should do the rest.) See ya, Quicky
     
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