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Trap Facts From Fulford 1898

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Drew Hause, Jan 8, 2011.

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  1. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    E.D. Fulford defeated Capt. Jack Brewer "Champion Wing Shot of the World" and "The Best Shot on Live Birds the World Has Ever Known" when they shot three, 100 bird matches at Al Heritage's grounds, Marion, New Jersey in November, 1891 for $3000 a side. Fulford killed 204 birds straight during the match.

    Fulford won the re-match January, 1892 at Woodland Park, Long Island for $1,000 a side, killing 100 birds straight to Brewer’s 99. In preliminary practice and in the match Fulford scored 421 birds straight. After the loss, Brewer declared "I will shoot against any man in the world for the World's Championship Cup which I now hold with $5000 or $10,000 a side, Hurlingham or London Club rules to govern." There is no record that match took place.

    He won the 1898 Grand American Handicap at Live Birds using a Remington Hammerless and died Oct. 15, 1904 of pneumonia at only 41 years of age.

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    Utica, N. Y. March 14, 1898. Gun Editor "Sporting Life"

    The first requisite for a successful trap shot is a good, level head and the power to govern himself if possessed of a nervous temperament: remembering at all times if one can’t control his temper he can’t control his gun. I want to see a man call "pull" twenty times, if necessary, when the traps are working badly, with" a smile on his face, and then break the target when it does fly. If a man speaks to you while shooting make the best of it; If a foreign substance or smoke blows into your eye make the best of it; If a target flies out of its natural course, or is not a fair bird, don’t shoot; if you do and miss it, offer no excuse whatever, as you will only be laughed at.

    A gun with two sets of barrels, both the same length and weight, is to be recommended. Have trap set bored to shoot 70 per -cent, of load in a 30-inch circle, at 40 yards. Have field set with right barrel cylinder and left barrel modified choke. Get a gun with drop and cast-off that fits you, and one that you can hit the objects with. The average man needs about 2 3/4 inches drop at butt, 1 1/2 inches drop at comb, 14 1/4 inches long, full pistol grip, weight 7 1/2 to 8 pounds. The Remington Arms Company without doubt or question produce the best and strongest gun for the money made in the world to-day.

    I consider the U. M. C. shell the best. I know nothing about any powder but Schultze and believe it the best nitro powder made. For a target load use 2 3/4 to 3 drams, wadded with a split salmon No. 11 two pink-edge. No. 11 and 1 1/4 ounces No. 7 chilled shot, in 2 3/4 inch Trap or Smokeless case. For live birds use 45 to 50 grains, wadded with one split salmon No. 11. two pink-edge. No. 11, 1 1/4 ounces No. 7 and 1 3 / 16 ounces No. 6 chilled shot, in 2 3/4 inch case. You can make no mistake in using the above loads for trap shooting of the present clay. Always use a wad one size larger than the gauge of your
    gun: the latter is very important in any gun.

    Shot traveling at the rate of 900 feet per second requires one-sixth of a second to go 50 yards, one-eighth of a second to go 40-yards, one-tenth of. a second to go 30 yards, and one-fifteenth of a second to go 20 yards. An object moving at the rate of 30 miles an hour goes 4 1/2 feet while the shot travels 40 yards: an object moving at the rate of 60 miles an hour goes 9 feet while the shot is traveling 40 yards; an object moving at the rate of 120 miles an hour goes 18 feet while the shot is traveling 40 yards. Therefore, in order to make a junction of your shot and target, you must learn to time the distance, move your gun just as fast as the object – no faster and no slower – and don’t stop the motion of your gun when you pull the trigger.

    A great many are of the opinion that each man shoots with a different system, but such is not the case. It may be so with the poorer class of shooters, but with the best shots of America all shoot so near alike, or know where to aim, that there is one grand-standard. It often takes years to find the right place. Different men take different ways, but the result is always the same.
    The position of the gun should be a free and easy one, with left arm extended so there is a slight bend at the elbow; the butt should be dropped 2 1/2 inches or more from the face, and never, never hold your gun glued to your shoulder.

    A beginner should get a pair of shells known as "snaps," which have a spring in the primer hole, and it does not hurt the hammers to snap them. Placing the gun to your shoulder before a (mirror) and snapping at an object, several yards away, the instant it strikes your shoulder is almost as good practice as the real shooting. The novice should study his position, because the centre of gravity has as much to do with good shooting as anything else. Learn to get in the strongest position possible when your gun goes off - not when it starts - and always have a little force in reserve, so when you get a fast quarterer you can push the gun further in front with ease and control it’s motion.
     
  2. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Geez Drew. That is really interesting. It is guys like you and stuff like the Fulford article that make our lives interesting. Thanks Drew. I owe yo one.

    Jack
     
  3. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Jack, but it is to gentlemen like Fulford, Gilbert, Marshall, Elliott, Crosby, Fanning, Heikes, et all that we owe our thanks.

    Fulford invented a mechanical target thrower, and a single trigger. This ad from January 2, 1904 "The American Field" and courtesy of David Noreen

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  4. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    Drew, Interesting reading. There are a lot of shooters who should memorize the first paragraph under the picture! It would help them immensely. Bill
     
  5. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    "never, never hold your gun glued to your shoulder"

    Strange advice.

    Don Verna
     
  6. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    What about the "2-1/2 inches or more from the face" part? Wow.

    Look at the picture -- he's basically raising bis guns POI by keeping the stock low. I mean, mentally draw a line from his front bead to his eyes. That line would be about 4 degrees from the line of the barrel. He's using an imagimary high rib!

    By the way, are his fingers actually on the barrel? That could get tad warm after a while.

    -Gary
     
  7. 22hornet

    22hornet Well-Known Member

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    Rolla Heikes designed a leather pad to prevent burning your hand on the barrel. Thanks for the great article. I love the pioneering stories about our sport.
     
  8. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    1-1/4 ounce of 7s from the 18 yard line is a potent load on clays or feathers.

    Thanks for the great articles Drew!!

    Hap
     
  9. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    Most of the shooters of the late 1890s extended their left hand far out onto the barrels as Gary observed

    Charles Grimm (obviously a studio pic)

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    George Roll in 1897

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    Capt. A.W. "Blue Rock" Money

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    Heikes Hand Protectors

    389761440.jpg
     
  10. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    What Hap said, and the loads were mostly 3 1/2 dram BUT Charles Grimm defeated Doc Carver in Chicago for the "Cast Iron Metal" Jan. 1897

    Grimm used a 12-bore L. C. Smith gun, 7 3/4 pounds, 3 3/4 drams Schultze, 1 1/4 ounce No. 7 shot, in U. M. C. Trap shell.

    Carver used a 12-bore Cashmore gun, 8 pounds weight, 4 drams (!!) of Carver powder, 1 1/4 No. 7 shot, in U. M. C. Trap shell.
     
  11. SPORTALLURING

    SPORTALLURING Active Member

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    The famous Cast Iron Medal, was won more times consecutive and retired by the Great J.A.R Elliott.

    Sportalluring


    sportalluring_2008_030323.jpg
     
  12. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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  13. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    In 1892 where would one get $10,000,
    His hand is wrapped all the way around the barrels and his head is no where close to the stock of the gun.. If I were to try to shoot this way I could not hit a barn from the inside.. thanks for the post!
     
  14. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    All of the images that I've seen from that era are posed, and usually in the low gun 'ready' position. Here's Sportalluring's fella J.A.R. c. 1900

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    This is the earliest, and best, 'live action' shot from 1911. Wish I knew who the shooters were.

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    The shooter on station 3 stands a bit like John R. Taylor, here on station 5

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  15. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    After the 1901 Anglo-American match, Elliott went on to Belgium and joined R.A. Welch competing in a series of pigeon matches, winning 1000 francs in one match. The purse in Namur was $40,000!!
     
  16. neofight

    neofight TS Member

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    This is really great stuff. Looks like he was using his thumb knuckle as a center bead.

    Thanks for putting this up.
     
  17. SPORTALLURING

    SPORTALLURING Active Member

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    Drew, second photo post 5 shooter could be Charles Newcomb (PA.)

    Sportalluring
     
  18. shark1

    shark1 Member

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    Good thread! Like reading about the old times. Mike Sharkey, DC
     
  19. Drew Hause

    Drew Hause Well-Known Member

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    BTW: $40,000 in 1901 is about $600,000 today.
     
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