1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Tongue oil finish

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by luvtrapguns, Apr 19, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,901
    Location:
    FL
    Is it easy to keep looking good? Durable? Touch up? Refinish? Is it about the same as Tru Oil? Any/all comments appreciated. Thanks, Marc
     
  2. turmite

    turmite Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    519
    Marc,

    Tung oil is a natural by product of the seed of the Tung tree. It is a natually polymersing oil (hardens on it's own) but that process takes a good while. This is a non toxic oil that can be used on wooden bowls, plates and cooking utensils. I have never used it raw on a stock so can't give advice there, but it sure does make for a good base to mix your own oil gunstock finish.

    By itself, I doubt it would be very hard, but then, no oil finish is real hard. It would be very easily repaired by simply rubbing some tung oil on the damaged area, letting it harden then buff to the sheen you want.

    If you want my formula I will be glad to share it.

    Mike
     
  3. Mark425

    Mark425 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    841
    Some guys are always smartasses....funny he doesnt have an answer...they usually dont. Anyway...no its not the same. It is easy to apply though and works OK for a stock finish but there are much better choices. Like the Tru-oil you mentioned. It is an oil but ends up closer to a varnish than a oil finish. I have tried a few types of finish and I just love the look of Permalyn. Its lots of work..but...in the end...oh so beautiful. Easy to maintain or repair.

    http://www.laurelmountainforge.com/finish_instruction.html
     
  4. kiv-c

    kiv-c Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2009
    Messages:
    852
    I second the vote for Permalyn. Great stuff to work with and makes for a beautiful finish!

    I use just the sealer. wipe it on, rub it in, wipe off the excess and let dry overnight. Repeat as many times as needed to fill the pores. This method eliminates all that rubbing down between coats with steel wool, sandpaper, etc.

    You can also shorten up the process by using a good pore filler (French Red, etc.)before starting the Permalyn process.

    Kiv
     
  5. otnot

    otnot Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,426
    I have used Tung oil on several stocks and like the ease of fixing scratches. One thing I have done to fill the pores is to, oil the stock and use 400 grit wet sandpaper and sand lightly until your oil collects enough sawdust to rub into the pores. Repeat as necessary.
     
  6. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,775
    Bob Levine,

    I beg to differ with you. If they are Democrats we are talking about, it is defintiely tongue oil! Smell Pelosi's breath.
     
  7. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,901
    Location:
    FL
    I guess that by spelling it incorrectly it's easy to see that I do not know much about it. Nice that I could make somebody's day by allowing them to make the correction.

    I have found a site for FORMBY BY MINWAX that pretty much spells things out. It comes in low or high gloss and is priced in the $4 to $5 range for an 8oz bottle. I obtained a Ljutic stock made by Umberger that is a beaut. I was told it had a Tung oil finish. I will strip my forearm wood and refinish to match the stock. From there on it looks to be pretty easy caring for this finish.

    Thanks, Marc
     
  8. RSVP410

    RSVP410 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    313
    I fully agree with the permalyn recommendation. Frech Red filler stain, Permalyn Sealer and Permalyn Finish does a super job. It takes time but does a beautiful job. Good luck with your project.

    Scott
     
  9. art g

    art g Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    312
  10. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,722
    That Tongue oil tastes nasty, and causes Diahrea. HaHa just kidding.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  11. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,460
    Location:
    SE PA
    luv, I've used authentic tung oil to finish several things, including a stock that supposedly came with an "oil" finish. It is not difficult to work with, but you have to be patient. Real tung oil does fill pores, and produces a waterproof finish that can be easily refurbished at any time. I love it and would not use tru-oil or any of the varnish type products.

    BTW, if you do it correctly, there is no sanding between coats. The trick is to wipe it down often, twice a day preferably, so the excess oil that weeps from the pores does not harden. Once it hardens you must use steel wool (bad) or fine sandpaper to remove the residue. Wiping often completely eliminates that requirement.
     
  12. semperfi909

    semperfi909 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,920
    I mask off the checkering when refinishing a stock and when all is done I use no-gloss tung oil in the checkering. With a soft polished finish on the stock the tung oil provides a no shine checkering.

    Works for me

    Charlie
     
  13. Fowlgunner

    Fowlgunner Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Messages:
    170
    It can be a very nice finish.

    A good amount of work but a forgiving process.

    Will Gurton
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    fowlguner, did you use a stais too?
     
  15. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2006
    Messages:
    3,523
    Location:
    Blackshear, Georgia
    Fowlgunner, Would you be so kind as to give us the process you used to attain that finish. That is an absolute stunning wood set with a beautiful finish. Thanks for showing us. Jackie B.
     
  16. turmite

    turmite Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2008
    Messages:
    519
    zzt and Will,

    Did either of you use pure uncut tung oil for your finish? When I have tried that, it seems to take forever to dry? If you are using the pure oil, did you do something to speed the dry time?

    BTW Will, stunning wood and finish.....on a not too bad looking piece of iron to boot!

    Mike
     
  17. Fowlgunner

    Fowlgunner Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Messages:
    170
    Thanks guys. Not bad for a $225 gun and a lot of work and time.

    The finish I use is a Tung Oil based finish that is modified with additives and cut with mineral spirits.

    It applies exactly the way you would with tru-oil, it just seems to dry quicker, 24 hrs. between coats.

    Bruce, no stain, just good walnut and a lucky match.

    Good Luck guys,

    Will
     
  18. Mark425

    Mark425 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    841
    REAL Tung Oil Finish is a much different product than something like Formbys. Not that Formby's isnt a good product but it has less than 1% Tung Oil. Can't always believe whats on the can, sorta like Male Enhancements. It is really thinned varnish and linseed oil. One way to tell the real stuff from the thinned Varnish/Linseed stuff is to look at the application instructions. If it says apply and let dry its not the real stuff. If it says apply and come back later and wipe off the excess it a REAL tung oil/mixture. 100% Tung Oil is not that easy to work with and takes FOREVER to dry. Its thick like honey, is needs to be thinned and is sometimes mixed with wax or other products. Here is a list from my old funiture making days:

    (Some TUNG OIL/varnish mixtures*)
    Deft Danish Oil
    General Finishes' Sealacell
    Behlen Danish Oil
    Maloof Finish
    Behr Scandinavian Tung Oil Finish
    Minwax Tung Oil Finish
    Minwax Antique Oil Finish
    Velvit Oil
    Watco Danish Oil
    McCloskey Tung Oil Finish (contains pure tung oil, not linseed oil)

    (Thinned varnishes*.... BAD)
    Minway Wiping Varnish
    Watco Wiping Varnish
    Formby's Tung Oil Finish
    Zar Wipe-on Tung Oil
    Val-Oil
    Hope's Tung Oil Varnish
    Gillespie Tung Oil
    Waterlox
    General Finishes' Arm R Seal
    Jasco Tung Oil

    For a gun stock I would use the stuff in the 1st list, its much nicer, is more like an oil finish, easier to get a nice look and is MUCH more durable.

    My two cents
     
  19. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,460
    Location:
    SE PA
    turmite, I did use pure, uncut tung oil, the best grade I could buy. It does take a long time to dry, but it is worth it.

    In every case I followed the recommendations of the woodworking shop I bought the oil at. The worked. I was advised to cut the tung oil with good mineral spirits and apply liberally for the first coat. You brush it on until the wood will take no more, then let it drain, then wipe. There will be a continual weeping of decreasing intensity for 5 or 6 days, until the first coat hardens some. If you have wiped all the "weepings" off religiously, there is not prep for the second coat.

    Mask off the checkering and apply the second coat, rubbing it into the wood as you go. Massage it in, then wipe off any excess. Allow it to sit for a little while. The time varies, but you are watching for the surface to become a little tacky. When it reaches this stage, rub all of the finish off the surface of the wood. It will take some elbow grease. A thin film will remain. That is okay. When it is all off, put it someplace warm to dry. Check it twice a day and rub off any finish that weeped from the pores. Do this for as long as it takes.

    After wiping twice a day for a week, the stock will be dry. You could even put it on the gun and use it for a shoot, but I wouldn't. If you do, take it back off after the shoot and continue wiping twice a day. It takes 3 weeks for the pure tung oil to polymerize. Once it has, the finish is "cured". It will be waterproof, lustrous (because of all the wiping/buffing you did) and hard. It will be easy to invisibly touch up if needed.

    Once it is cured (wait an extra week or two just in case) you can decide if you want to apply more coats. If you do, wipe/rub them on sparingly, then wait for the surface to become a little tackier than your second coat before you start rubbing it off. If the second coat is fully cured and dry before you apply the subsequent coat, there will be no weeping.

    Be advised the tung oil will change the color of the wood, so try it on a sample piece first. If you decide you want to stain the wood, it must be done and thoroughly dry before you apply the first coat of tung oil.

    It is a bit more wok than a one day varnish type finish, but it is worth the extra time to me. The process is no where near as tedious as the instant finish manufactures would have you believe.
     
  20. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,753
    tigman46, Permalyn, dries quickly, very tough and durable. Easy to repair. It has a honey color. get it from Brownells. Natural oils take way too long to dry and have no advantage.

    Fowlgunner, How many years did it take?
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.