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To blue or not to blue

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Tally, Feb 25, 2012.

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  1. Tally

    Tally TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9
    Everyone, I recently acquired fro my late mother=in=law's estate a k frame S&W 18-3 .22 caliber revolver. Nice little gun with a wonderful trigger. It appears to be in fine shape except for holster wear and a small ding at the edge of one of the wood grips.

    I took it out to the club last Wednesday to try it out on the pistol range. While there I let a few trapshooting buddies take a look at it. I mentioned that I was thinking about having it reblued. We have a gunsmith in the area that does great rebluing work. Everyone there was doubtful that that was a good idea. The consensus being that it would reduce the value of the piece. These are all people whose opinions I respect.

    So, would anyone like to weigh in on this issue?

    Thanks

    Tally
     
  2. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    5,474
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    Changing the finish on a gun, even just to a fresher version of the same finish, devalues it in the eyes of a collector. But in the eyes of a gun owner who wants a gun to shoot and enjoy, it makes the gun more attractive. Which camp are you in?

    S&W revolvers like yours - made when forged parts were used and before the dreaded internal locks became standard equipment - have a higher collector value than the newer ones and the K-frame 22 rimfire models are slightly more valuable than the centerfires, for some reason. But if you want to use the gun as a shooter, I'd have it reblued as long as the new finish is exactly like the original one.

    That's not always a guaranteed thing. I inherited a Colt Official Police .38 Special from my father that had some bluing wear. I had it reblued and it came back to me wearing a matte finish instead of a glossy one like it originally had. If you have seen work the person you are considering using has done and it is satisfactory, go for it.

    Ed
     
  3. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    Nov 12, 2007
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    3,518
    Heck, a factory reblue is likely the best idea? Call Smith and Wesson. That's what I did for an older Model 52 Smith I have and all is well and documented by the factory.

    David
     
  4. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Whats wrong with leaving it as it is? Shows a little character and you dont have to be as careful or worried about it?

    True we arent talking a heirloom but just enjoy shooting it

    Gene
     
  5. billyboy07208

    billyboy07208 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    571
    Wipe some oxpho blue on the bare areas,otherwise a genuine smith factory finish will not degrade it, except for the purists,and wtf- they demand nib anyways..
     
  6. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Idaho
    If you do decide to have it re blued, use Glenrock in Wyoming. They do absolutely superb work
     
  7. Johnny

    Johnny Well-Known Member

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    2,792
    Like Gene said, those are character marks, show them with pride. You won't likely get the same finish as S&W put on it. Probably more black than blue. I wouldn't think about it unless they could duplicate the original finish, guaranteed.
     
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