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Timing flinch

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by markc2, Jun 20, 2011.

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  1. markc2

    markc2 Member

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    Does anyone know what can be done about fliching? This has just started to happen to me in the last couple of weeks. It seems to show up during the last ten or so targets and has cost me a Handicap punch and a singles trophy. I have never had a problem before and I am not recoil shy, so it must be a mental issue. If anyone has a cure, please help! Mark
     
  2. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Release Trigger and don't look back. Worked for me.
     
  3. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    If you don't think you'll need a release trigger yet your gonna realize it soon. Fighting it doesn't work. It's usually best to give in to the dark side-or maybe take up fishing!!
     
  4. trapshooterjoe7

    trapshooterjoe7 Member

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    You can flinch just as bad with a release as you do with a pull trigger. My flinches come from not seeing the bird clearly, this is just a suggestion, lower your hold point a little, if that doesn't help try holding an empty shell in your left hand, just don't scratch your forearm.A release may be in your future but they are not a cure all. Joe
     
  5. markc2

    markc2 Member

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    I have tried a release trigger and I just can't program my mind that way. I have heard several theories concerning not seeing the bird clearly and others that say that your mind forces you to flinch under the pressure of competition. I know that it cost me a trophy and a punch this Sunday in handicaps. I am very frustrated and just don't know what to do. Mark
     
  6. ric3677

    ric3677 Well-Known Member

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    email sent
     
  7. Mark-in-Maine

    Mark-in-Maine Member

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    I overcame a real bad flinch just by taking an extra second longer before pulling the trigger to let the bird get out of the house where I could see it clearly.
    Hope this helps.

    Mark in Maine
     
  8. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Mark, you are doing what I was doing, I bet. Trying so hard to hit it that you get scared and miss it. That's why it's happening on the last 10 birds. Swing to it and shoot it without being afraid to miss. Do it quickly without thought or fear.
     
  9. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    Likely, you are thinking too much about the trigger, or are cadence shooting. Part of the brain wants to shoot at a certain time whether or not the gun is where it needs to be. This creates an inner conflict during which you eventually jerk the trigger.

    A release may not help this. It did not help me. I like a release, but make my livelihood training with defensive firearms. Autopilot with a release trigger is not good in a defensive pistol class.

    I beat my (horrible) timing flinch by using my entire focus to look at the target. Let the reactive brain handle moving the gun to the bird and pulling the trigger.

    I quit thinking about the trigger. Worked for me, may well work for you.

    Now, if only my vision was better! LOL
     
  10. rlh24758

    rlh24758 TS Member

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    Mark in Main, you hit the nail on the head, take a little extra time to look at the target, and you will also see your scores improve
     
  11. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    A lot of posters are saying basically the same thing and you are correct this is a mental battle.

    My trick is from Phil Kiner and it involves putting this one thought in your head - see the bird, shoot the bird. The trick is making that one thought the only thought rattling around up there. Say it repeatedly to yourself as you are loading the gun and getting ready to fire - make seeing that target the most important thing you have to do right then - as if just seeing it clealy is as important as breaking it. (as it turns out they are the same)

    If you are skeptical about this you already have the proof that the other kinds of thoughts are effective at getting you to spazz out just as soon as you start thinking them...

    Release triggers do mask the effects of a flinch fairly well but they don't keep you from spazzing out.
     
  12. markc2

    markc2 Member

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    I emailed Phil Kiner and he was kind enough to call me and discuss my situation. He agreed on seeing the bird more clearly and also suggested I raise my comb 1/16 of an inch, shoot a round, and see if I get more smoke or less smoke after the adjustment. Another suggestion he gave was to increase my trigger pull slightly (it is currently at 3 1/2lbs and he suggested moving it to 4) and see if that has any effect on the flinching.From all that I have gathered, I have developed a mental fear of dropping a bird and that fear has manifested itself in the form of a flinch. I guess I have o find some way to stop thinking about anything except for seeing and shooting the bird. I hope I can figure out a way to do it. Mark
     
  13. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Pretty cool how a pro like Phil Kiner will take time out of his busy schedule to talk with us average Joes.

    Good luck with your shooting Mark, I think you are going to get control over that spazz demond.
     
  14. markc2

    markc2 Member

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    Yeah, Phil is first class. He was between meetings and made the time twice to call me and discuss this issue. You just don't find many that are willing to do that.
    Wolfram- thanks for the vote of confidence. I suspect that I'm going to need it, but I am determined to overcome this problem.
     
  15. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Marc, relax!!! I too think your not seeing the bird well. Its like Shooting coach said. One side of the brain wants to pull the trigger at a certain time. The other side of the brain sees the barrel and wants to see the correct sight picture before the other side of brain pulls the trigger. Sometimes one side wants to stop the other and the problem starts. You might be suffering from some fatigue as well. You might be lowering or raising your hold points at the end. I find it easy for me to start to raise them without notice until its to late many times. Good Luck and Break-em all. Jeff
     
  16. Ljutic111

    Ljutic111 TS Member

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    I`m no expert but did go to a release many years ago . I also found that holding a tighter gun with both hands works for me since I still may flinch if I cradle the gun in my hands as everyone says to do . Tighter the better and no flinch .
     
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