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This is your brain on LEAD...questions?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by crusha, Jan 27, 2008.

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  1. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Now where did I put my shell belt?...Doh, I'm wearing it...

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  2. tomk2

    tomk2 Member

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    I think you have to eat it or breath it (for powders and forms other than solid lead) to become exposed. So as long as Rover doesn't eat the dirt, he should be OK.
     
  3. trappermike

    trappermike Well-Known Member

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    Tom is right, you have to eat it or breathe it to be exposed. Lead dust is prety heavy, you probably knew that, so it doesn't remain airborne for long. It is hard to breathe. As for lead in front of the trap house?? If there is a lot of lead in front of the trap house, I don't want to shoot those guys. Most of the lead I shoot continues for some distance beyond the trap house.

    Broken targets are carcinogenic? Where did that come from? Whole targets are not carcinogenic? Again, where is the exposure? I don't know about you guys, but I odn't eat targets. BTW, the will cause illness and death in hogs of the hogs eat them. If you study toxicology a little bit, you will learn that it is the dose that makes a poison.

    Enough salt will kill you, a little makes your popcorn taste better.

    Mike
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Mike- Some shooters make more dust from targets than others and they could cause more exposure. The targets are pitch and limestone. Limestone is a good antacid and a source of Calcium. It is not as good a source of Ca as ground up clam shells but it is a source. Pitch is not a thing I would like to eat but it is probably not too harmful.

    Lead shot in the ground can form lead carbonate, especially in acidic soil. This is water soluble and in high doses could cause some problems.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine who did a lot of bullets casting over several decades - and I mean a lot - in a converted bedroom got tested for lead. The results were no more than the average person. As long as you're washing before eating food after eating lead, not smoking around lead (for some reason the lead dust attaches itself to smoke particles), have reasonable ventilation, aren't heating the lead up too high, and aren't breathing in dust from the oxides that form on old lead, then your exposure is minimal. The worst lead contamination comes not from casting but from shooting guns in confined areas. Like indoor ranges. And the lead is not so much from the bullets (though bullet splash can be an issue) but from the primers. This is where good ventilation is a must. The powder residue on the guns, especially revolvers, contains a lot of this lead residue from primers. Again, you must make sure your hands get washed before handling food.
     
  6. The Rock

    The Rock Active Member

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    I have loaded close to 50,000 hulls and have come into contact with lead with my hands maybe ten times (couple of accidents and busted bags).I have no reason to handle it or play with it except when the time comes to shoot it.

    Here we go again O great Government protect me from myself. Amen!!!

    Rock

    Jim
     
  7. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    To my knowledge, lead in its natural state causes very little hazard.

    All the hullabaloo about lead poisoning was the result of chemically changed lead compounds, as in tetraethyl lead which put a lot of bad stuff in the air from your gasoline, for many decades. Also the lead used in oil based paint many years ago caused some problems, as in babies chewing on the rails of their painted cribs.

    Lead - the metal- occurs naturally in the environment without any disasters. Cities used to use lead pipes in their water systems.

    Most of the lead fear evinced in media these days is a bunch of libspeak bullshit.

    HM
     
  8. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Lead Carbonate is classified as not water soluble. In fact, all carbonates, sulfides, oxides and hydroxides are insoluble. See above link.
     
  9. Post  2

    Post 2 TS Member

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    I have been told that it takes a duck 7 years to die of a lethal dose of lead poisoning. The average life of a duck is two years. Believe it or not. Post-2
     
  10. ec90t

    ec90t Guest

    Post-2,

    The usual time of death for a duck that is exposed to a lethal dose of lead in my neck of the woods is about 10 seconds!

    Did I say lead, I ment to say steel. He he he!

    ec90t
     
  11. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    Come on, Eric, what's that down in the leg of your waders? Are you glad to see me or is that a couple of lead shotshell loads?

    HM
     
  12. ou.3200

    ou.3200 Well-Known Member

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    If you read down the cited article you will see the following:

    "For younger people, prevention is a clearer strategy, Hu said. He called for tougher federal standards on lead exposure in the workplace."

    If it ever became law I doubt that lead used in small arms ammunition would be exempt from the "tougher federal standards."
     
  13. rdf59

    rdf59 Member

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    A trap and clays shooting friend told me that while he was working as range director at a large club one of the shot shell people told him that washing your hands with soap and water after reloading does not get lead off your hands adequately to eat something like a sandwich. Many people do not use latex gloves, I did not for many years.

    He suggested D.Wipe Towels from Esca Tech, Inc. These towels remove heavy metals like nickel, Cadimium, Mercury, Silver, Zinc and Lead from your hands. I bought some a month or two ago. Can't remember where ( effects of the lead?) but I don't think it was Midway or B-P
     
  14. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    I am reasonably careful about minimizing my exposure to lead as well as any other potentially hazardous material. I think that is simply a prudent thing to do. For example, before the price of lead went berzerk, I always washed my hands promptly and thoroughly after handling bags of shot or after a loading session.

    That said, I am skeptical of scientific studies that conclude exposure to (insert the substance du jour) causes death, disease, metabolic mayhem, sterility, reduced reproductive rates, birth defects and/or any other medical maladay in white rats when they are used as test subjects.

    In my opinion, white rats are unusually sickly creatures. Spray a white rat with distilled water and it will develop cancer. Throw two otherwise "healthy" white rats in a sterile box and they'll give each other some danged disease.
    I'm thinking we should just feed them all to cats, big snakes, or other rat eating creatures and be done with them!

    scientifically yours,

    sissy
     
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