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This Day 1944

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Nuts, Dec 22, 2010.

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  1. Nuts

    Nuts TS Member

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    On this day in 1944, during the Battle of the Bulge, General Anthony McAuliffe rejected the German demand of surrender by writing "Nuts!" in his offical reply. (actully I read later that the response was laced with profanity-not sure if that is true or not, but I tend to beleive so.)

    I think we can all learn something from that--even when things seem hopeless, don't give up, and don't loss your sense of perspective, or sense of humor.

    Years later I learned my High School Football coach was a in the Battle. He never said a word about it, and I only learned of it by reading his obit. He had two favorite sayings: "Never let the other guy know you feel cornered--because you never are". And "Suprise the Sons of Btchs". Now tell me those sayings don't have their origin in the Battle of the Bluge!

    Thats the origin of my alias.

    Nuts
     
  2. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    Thanks for reminding us, had a friend,long passed, that was in the Battle of the Bulge those guys were characters.
     
  3. DONNE

    DONNE Member

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    My Dad was there. He never talked much about it , but he convinced me to enlist in the Navy by telling me some of the things the 101 st had to endure .
    He also told me very early in life , "ain't no such thing as a fair fight".
     
  4. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    My uncle was there and this is the plaque that he received. Bulge,
    barrelbulge_2008_210810.jpg
     
  5. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    My father-in-law was one of the first men in to relieve Bastogne from Patton's 3rd Army. He told me the road into and out of town was stacked with bodies. He called them Logs. A term I had never heard before. But, that's what the Americans called the frozen German bodies, "Logs."
     
  6. missed some

    missed some TS Member

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    thanks for the history lesson. mark crist
     
  7. sliverbulletexpress

    sliverbulletexpress TS Member

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    Wow Bulge that plaque is priceless thanks for sharing it.
     
  8. over the hill

    over the hill Active Member

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    I worked with a guy back in the early 60s that got caught up in the
    Ardennes invasion.

    He was in the 99th Div. and was guarding an ammo dump when a column of German tanks roared past.

    We just froze he, said. The TC gave him a good stare but never slowed. They probably had strict orders.

    He said his orders were to blow it if any thing "unusual" happened.

    He got news letters called the Bugler that was a publication of the 99th Div.



    Regards.....Gerald
     
  9. Dahaub

    Dahaub Active Member

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    A good friend of mine's dad was in the bulge battle. In their house they had a cabinet of his military stuff on display. In it were all of his medals and one uniform and on a shelf was a couple of curious things. There was a pack of gum and a wallet. The gum had been shot through and the wallet had a bullet lodged in it but it never went through. I asked Mr Clausen about the wallet and he said they were in a fox hole and trying to sleep and the wallet was bothering his hip so he put it in his breast pocket and laid back down and was hit by a lobbed shot that didn't quite get thru the wallet to his chest. Said that he was a lucky guy that day and still always carried his wallet in the front left pocket of his shirts. Also said in the battle of the bulge he never ran so fast or so far for so long as he did those three days. He was a good man and has been gone a long while now. Dan
     
  10. MAL-53

    MAL-53 Member

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    Bulge, that plaque is really nice, thanks for sharing it with us, Merry Christmas!! ML.
     
  11. lots of 24's

    lots of 24's Member

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    These vets have such great stories to tell. If we would all just take the time to listen. We are losing them faster and faster now days.
     
  12. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

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    Battle of the Bulge don't count-It was before Michelle Obama felt proud to be an American.
     
  13. daddiooo

    daddiooo TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    My dad was at the Battle of the Bulge also and like most of the others he didn't talk about it much at all. He was 101st Airborne. I only knew he was always a little distant around Christmas. Found out later from my mother that the only thing he had on Christmas Day in 1944 was hot cup of Sanka coffee. (That and surrounded by the German Army) Their generation bore the scars and painful memories of war and acheived so much with so little that it's hard to understand why people in this day and time don't even know about this part of history.

    All gave some......some gave all.
     
  14. DB Bill

    DB Bill Active Member

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    I knew a couple of fellows who were in the 101st at Bastonge and when they tell the story they are adamant that they were neither rescued nor relieved by wee Georgie Patton's tanks --- they were simply augumented.
     
  15. trap906

    trap906 Member

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    my grandfather was there too. He said they were pinned down for several days before the actual bulge took place, i believe he said somewhere in the hurtgen forrest. He said the snow was deep and it was bitter cold. He also said they were low on ammo and replacements and supplies couldn't get to them until a few days before the bulge. He and one or two others had pnuemonia and were finally taken to a field hospital when help could get to them. and eventually to England where he finished out the war as part of the air corps. I will always remember him talking about those "Damn Germans" every time it snowed. He never got over being cold. About October every year he started complaining about the cold and wore warm clothes till spring. Funny I never understood why he hated the cold so much till I was grown. He loved to hunt and shoot and he loved the fact that he had used a "Garand Rifle" he thought it was the finest rifle ever. He lived to be 94, passed on a few years ago. He was, Harry Earle Berry, From Mammoth Spring Ar. wonder if he new any of the guys you fellas been talking about. He was my Papaw and I loved him.
     
  16. grnberetcj

    grnberetcj Active Member

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    If anyone gets the opportunity, visit Ft. Campbell and check out the 101st WWII display.

    Curt
     
  17. trap906

    trap906 Member

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  18. daddiooo

    daddiooo TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Bushmaster,

    If it wasn't for the TRUE AMERICANS that biscuit lip idiot Shelly Obama would be speaking german and waiting on tables.

    She may finally be proud of her country but the rest of us are damned ashamed
    of her and her 5-7-9 shop wardrobe not to mention her bucket mouth.

    Dave
     
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