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This Ain't No Polish Joke.

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by JBrooks, Jul 10, 2008.

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  1. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    Stumbled across the letter posted below. I think most of us are aware that Poland has thrived with it's freedom from Russian domination and has become a shining light for democracy and progress in Europe. As such, its people and leaders have exhibited a much higher understanding of the value and values that the United States brings to the world. Enjoy and relect.

    "MESSAGE FROM THE POLISH TROOPS IN AFGHANISTAN TO THE U.S. TROOPS -

    Subject: 4th of July Greeting

    Dear Friends

    Two hundred and thirty two years ago, when your forefathers signed the Declaration of Independence, they changed the history of the world. Thanks to their sacrifices the world realized the true meaning of freedom. Independence and freedom are powerful words in your country as they are in Poland. When the United States gained independence, Poland was in the process of slowly loosing portions of its borders to its neighbors. We appreciate your efforts towards a unified and independent United States of America because we know how difficult it is to regain freedom and independence. Today we can be very happy with living in independent countries. Today we fight together for freedom for people in other countries, like here in Afghanistan.

    4th of July and Independence Day are identified in our country with aspiring to freedom and that is why we are so happy that we can celebrate this day with American soldiers signifying our common goals for peace and freedom.

    Today we wish you and your nation a peaceful and happy day.

    Polish Soldiers Polish Military Contingent"
     
  2. Mike Michalski

    Mike Michalski Member

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    Thank You JBrooks.
     
  3. John Thompson

    John Thompson TS Member

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    There are many cities and counties in the USA that are named after the Polish that fought for our independence in 1776, Kosiosko was one.
     
  4. jakearoo

    jakearoo Active Member

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    JB, I saw a movie last night, The Rape of Europa. It was about the Nazis' pillage and plunder of all of Europe's artwork during their rein. What I had not realized was that Hitler and his followers considered the entire Polish race as inferior (the same way they considered the Jews). He not only invaded Poland, but the orders to his troops was to completely destroy the entire country and kill every single Pole. The intent was to recolonize the land with good Arian Germans. The carnage was incredible.

    Thanks for posting this. Regards, Jake
     
  5. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    JBrooks, thanks for the posting.

    Many a Polish soldier, airman and even a few sailors fought for the Allied cause during WW II. The British, in particular, were indebted to Polish intelligence agents who provided them with a working Enigma encryption device in the early part of the war. As memory serves, there was a whole squadron of polish pilots in the Battle of Brittan. Communication with them was difficult because the only English they spoke was profanity.

    My uncle and namesake, 1st Lieutenant Edward Loziczonek, lead an infantry platoon in the final assault on Monte Casino in 1944. His cousin, Anthony Loziczonek watched as Edward was cut almost in half by a German machine gun. The fighting, according to Anthony in his memoirs was bitter and personal with few prisoners taken by either side.

    Another uncle, Henry Loziczonek was a Polish Calvary officer and he survived WW II. He became a prisoner of war two times. He was released by the Germans after the Polish surrendered in September, 1939 and was released by the Russians under an amnesty brokered by Roosevelt and Churchill in 1941. For the rest of the war, he fought against the Germans as a member of the Polish Resistance.

    I met Henry in 1981 and he told me several stories about how his Calvary unit would ride into the German rear areas at night and ambush supply dumps and convoys. They were equipped with light machine guns and mortars. They fought almost constantly for about three weeks until they ran out of food and ammunition. A German fighter plane attacked and he was shot off of his horse and left behind. A German medic treated him for three gunshot wounds and removed a piece of shrapnel from his back. Not all Germans were murders as the German medic was a professional soldier and saved his life.

    IMO, the Polish people are proud of their nation and their association with the United States.

    Ed Ward
     
  6. Mike Michalski

    Mike Michalski Member

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    School Teacher, Saw recently where the surviving commander of the Polish force that was decimated at Monte Casino died and in his will asked that he be buried with his men in Italy. Don't think he was Polish.
     
  7. 100straight

    100straight Member

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    Here is the story of another Pole that assisted in our freedom!


    Sometimes called the "Father of American Cavalry," Casimir Pulaski was born March 4th, 1747, in Warka, Poland. (It may have been 1746 or 1748.) He became a national Polish hero in 1771, when he and his army overwhelmingly defeated Russian forces in Czestochwa, Poland. Pulaski was wrongly accused in a plot to capture and kill the King of Poland and was banished from Poland.

    While in Paris, Casimir heard of the American Revolutionary War and the colonies' struggle to break free from England. He wrote Benjamin Franklin, who was in Paris, to ask if he would consider hiring him to fight against the British. After hearing of his reputation as a great leader, Franklin recommended him to General George Washington.

    Washington knew that the colonists had no trained cavalry, so he met with Pulaski and introduced him to LaFayette and John Hancock. In September 1777, Washington convinced Congress to give Pulaski temporary command of the small, new cavalry detachment. On the same day Pulaski saved military supplies and pushed back the British at the Battle of Brandywine. The next day he prevented a surprise attack at an area called Warren's Tavern. Congress acknowledged Pulaski's leadership and bravery and commissioned him as Brigadier General. He was placed in command of four light cavalry regiments.

    During the winter at Valley Forge in 1777-78, Pulaski wanted to train the cavalry properly, but was instructed by Congress to rest his men during the winter, as was customary at the time. Later in 1778, Pulaski became frustrated that his cavalry had not been involved in any important battles. Considering resignation, he asked Washington to allow him to start his own legion. He offered to recruit men, outfit them, and train them his own way. He would prepare this cavalry for active duty. After many letters from Pulaski, Congress finally agreed. With 68 horses and 200 foot soldiers, the Pulaski Legion would become the colonists' first true fully-trained cavalry.

    He recruited many men, European and some Americans. At first, some of the American soldiers did not like him because he did not speak English, but they soon began to respect him in battle for his courage and intelligence.
    During a battle in Savannah, Georgia, Casimir was wounded by a cannon. He died from complications of this wound. The first Monday in March has been designated Pulaski Day in Illinois. There is also Pulaski County honoring this great war hero. The Pulaski National Monument is located in Savannah.
     
  8. Bruce Specht

    Bruce Specht Well-Known Member

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    JBrooks, Thanks for posting that letter it should do us all good to read and realize that in fact the entire world does not hate us; as some would have us believe. Let Freedoom Ring!
     
  9. bocephus

    bocephus Member

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    The rest of the world may be jealous of what we have here and our "American Culture", they don't hate us for what we are but rather they envy us for what we are and they want their countries to be like ours but can't because of their governments.

    But it is our own liberal citizens that hate our country and want to see it's demise as if the rest of the world would worship them. After they achieve their goal what will there be for the rest of the world to be envious of?

    Oh yes they will achieve their goal......

    I would tell you all to wake up but it is already too late.
     
  10. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

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    M R Ducks - Didn't you read the title, this isn't a joke thread. That one was really sick.
     
  11. chessney

    chessney TS Member

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    I remember when Russia invaded Poland. They walked in backwards and said they were leaving...Now dat ders funny....Ziggy
     
  12. School Teacher

    School Teacher Well-Known Member

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    100Straight:

    Pulaski County, KY is also named after Count Kazimierz Pu?aski. Pulaski County includes the city of Somerset and is located near Lake Cumberland.

    Mike Michalski:

    My uncle Edward Loziczonek is buried at the Polish Cemetery near Monte Casino, Italy. Before the German invasion in 1939, he was a civil engineer.

    Ed Ward
     
  13. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    jBrooks,

    Where did you get this from, and are you sure its not just another internet/e-mail hoax?

    Just curious.
     
  14. Kent

    Kent TS Member

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    I have just recently returned home from a trip to Poland and my expectations or should I say the pre-concieved conception of what I expected to find were totaly different.

    Since the communist left I found a thriveing economy with freindy well educated people living in a booming growing (infrastructure wise) country.

    My wife had not been back since the early 1970's and she packed, belive it or not toilet paper in our luggage. She remembered severe shortages of such and soap.

    This is one of the hotels we stayed at. In Sopot, on the Baltic Sea.

    [​IMG]

    The country is very diverse and from the mountain area in the south.....

    [​IMG]

    To the agricultural area in the center and the heavy industry of the north.

    [​IMG]

    Food was good and even though the sign said free beer they had you on the backside. You have to pay to pee in most public restrooms( about a dollar)


    [​IMG]

    All in all it was a great trip, even missing my State shoot for the first time in 15 years.
     
  15. Kent

    Kent TS Member

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    Ham Hocks and kaputsta(Kraut)
     
  16. bill1949

    bill1949 Well-Known Member

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    We have a Pulaski County in Va. too, named after the great Polish General...Bill
     
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