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The Kuhner Autoloader - assembling

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by joe kuhn, Apr 17, 2012.

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  1. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Will be using a Browning Maxus for this project. Picked one up at Gander for $1300. There's another thread discussing why, the main reason being it has been reviewed as the best at soaking up recoil.


    joekuhn_2008_030344.jpg


    Took it a part to see what I've got. The good news is there's a lot of room inside the stock for weight. After shooting a Browning Gold the other day, I've come to realize I will be adding some weight to tame it, but not nearly as much as that needed in my 870. The bad news is there isn't enough wood at the top to have adj comb hardware installed. This end of the stock looks ok, but the other end is quite thin.


    joekuhn_2008_030315.jpg


    Unless I go with something like the Parazzi combs we've all seen:


    joekuhn_2008_030319.jpg


    Will have to see what Tron thinks about this one. Will ask Tron to do the adj butt pad on it, lengthen the stock some with spacers, install some pitch and maybe add an eject nib to be sure empties go down.

    So here's the gun taken apart. I shouldn't be surprised at the spring going back into the stock. I guess it was unexpected. Thinking about it's purpose in closing the action of the gun, limiting the pounding at the back of the receiver and supposedly soaking up some of the recoil, it makes me appreciate the role of the gas system. That's what this gun is - a highly engineered gas system. I can't begin to describe it, but it's supposed to let more gas out with faster loads. That should feed the spring in the stock about the same amount of work with each shot regardless of power. How's that for an armchair engineer eval?


    joekuhn_2008_030328.jpg


    Next step is to get the Burris Fast Fire III with SpeedBead mount. I've got an EoTech Holographic scope, but what the heck, the SpeadBead mount is made for the Fast Fire so I'll give it a try. Here's the mount.


    joekuhn_2008_030335.jpg


    Here's the FastFire III. Will go with the 8 MOA red dot and add several risers to get it all above the bbl so I can see under the dot and look for that target. Bead on gun will have to come out.


    joekuhn_2008_030342.jpg


    Scope parts are on order. While I'm waiting I can add some weight to the inside of the stock and see what I can bring it up to. Will test fire with added weight.

    Here's the scope I've been using on my pump gun.


    joekuhn_2008_030326.jpg
     
  2. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Suggestion.... Discuss with a comb installer the possibility of putting a flat area on the very top of the stock, installing the hardware, and adding a comb in the shape of a monte carlo. Don't worry about trying to match wood... cover the new comb with soft leather. (My trap gun has soft black leather on its adj comb.) Your neck is long enough that you can make use of the extra height of the hardware and also from adding a monte carlo.
     
  3. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Would like to see what you've got.
     
  4. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Joe,

    Most adjustable comb hardware is adjustable both up and down and side to side. This pic shows the common hardware with all adjutments. I think what Brian is saying, is not like this pic below shows, but flatten the top of the comb of the existing stock. Then hollow out the spot for the hardware and insert comb hardware in the hollowed out spot and then build a seperate comb to add on the new hardware. Instead of cutting the comb out of the existing stock, you would simply shave the top of the stock to make it flat and then hollow out the spot for the hardware. It would be an easy job for the multi-talented Tron.
    grntitan_2009_2503242.jpg
     
  5. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Sounds good. I've got to get that scope in to see just how much higher it needs to be. Thanks.
     
  6. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Your probably gonna need a higher comb than normal.
     
  7. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    You can also raise the comb area with casting resin, make it the height needed then insert the adjustable hardware and use a new padded comb piece? With casting resin, leave it clear or color match it to your wood color?

    Hap
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    grntitan hit the nail on the head. That's exactly what I'm suggesting.
     
  9. 221

    221 Well-Known Member

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    DUHhhh......put the hardware upside down....put the comb hardware in the stock, likewise with the comb.
     
  10. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Will let the expert make that call. Tron's samples link is above.

    Also see the need for a washer inside that stock to keep lead shot from going down in by the back of the receiver. There is a gap between the trigger assembly and the receiver that would let shot up inside. That cannot happen. Will tape up the gap and cut the sides off a washer to fit inside the square hole.


    joekuhn_2008_030315.jpg
     
  11. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Member

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    I was interested in Maxus but I cannot find anyone to make a release trigger for it. Too bad, this gun got some good reviews..Keep us posted on your progress....Smokit
     
  12. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Sure. Speaking of the trigger, it breaks at about 6-1/2 pounds but doesn't feel too tight. It's much wider than my 870 trigger. That may be the reason it feels ok.
     
  13. GoDawgs

    GoDawgs Member

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    Joe,
    I've been following your threads about building this gun. It's intriguing to me.

    As luck would have it, last night, a guy showed up to our range with a Benelli with the same Burris Speedbead setup you're putting on your gun. I didn't get to shoot his gun but I asked him if I could mount it and he obliged. I was surprised at what I saw.

    First, I typically shoot my gun with tape on my left lens. If I try to shoot with both eyes open and no tape, I see multiple barrels, several beads, etc, it's just a mess. I mounted this Benelli with both eyes open and no tape and saw a pretty clear picture. And, the frame around the Fast Fire was not as visible as I expected. Anyhow, I really wish I could have shot his gun.

    One question is.......what do you do when a target get outside the "frame" of the Fastfire? Is it easy to move and re-acquire it inside the lens of the Fastfire?

    I have a Benelli sitting in the safe and I might just have to try this someday.....
     
  14. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Dawg,

    I haven't shot the FastFire yet, but I can tell you that the EoTech holographic is large enough to see the target inside the frame all the time - from release to break. The Burris dimensions are smaller. Maybe you can try it the next time you see one and let me know.

    Here's how I visually shoot my gun. Hold gun even, look out in the field just below the circle, call, come back with eyes to see target peripherally, focus on it, move and go. The critical point, which I rediscovered last night, is to look out in the field, past the reticle and just below it. It becomes a game of 3-D convergence. Everything happens inside the scope's window.

    I've ordered some risers to go with the FastFire to get it up off the bbl like the setup I'm using now. My current setup is a 1/2 inch mount and then the scope itself which is rather tall. I need to measure from the top of the bbl to the center of the reticle. It's high enough over the bbl so that the bbl is completely out of the way. The bbl is actually just below the far edge of the trap house when holding my gun dead flat with the horizon.

    The SpeedBead I looked through once was set up lower so that the red dot was in front of the normal bead on the gun. I didn't see the advantage in that until your post above. There's another guy who built a gun with a scope who claims it helps his cross-firing. It has certainly helped me. My personal thinking is that you can't crossfire when you start by looking out into the field. Start somewhere else closer, like I did last night, and it felt like cross-firing as diagnosed by Phil Kiner. Took his clinic last summer...

    One advantage of an electronic bead is that it is movable with a small screw driver. I've been shooting my 870 with it set dead flat (poi) and the guys at the club have been telling me that I was under the targets when I missed and low when hitting. It took me a couple of sessions to try it, but all I did was move the pattern up by 1/2 a turn. What a difference in the breaks. Wow.

    Here is last year's Kuhner pump.


    joekuhn_2008_030317.jpg
     
  15. R.Kipling

    R.Kipling Well-Known Member

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    Joe,

    Have you given any thought to a saddle mount? They are available, will add a little weight between your hands and you can fit you Eotech without the added expense. Don't overlook UTG for a verity of mounting and height options either.

    Whatever, I applaud your efforts.

    Kip
     
  16. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Kip - that's a good option. I have tried one on a different gun and it worked fine. I do like the scope a little closer to my eye to maximize the field of view. Will keep it in mind if the mount between the stock and receiver doesn't work out. Thanks. Good reference. - Joe
     
  17. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Bore is .742 and the full choke constriction is .035.

    The directions that came with my bore gauge aren't very good. Here is what I did. I set my bore gauge to zero with the .700 ring that came with it in position down on the measuring balls. Then I put the gauge into the barrel well past the choke and it read 42 marks past the zero, hence .742. Since a standard 12 ga bore is .729, this gun is 13 thousandths overbored. Choke was 35 up from 42.

    When transitioning between the bore and the choke, my gauge opens up an extra .010 which is the gap between the bore and the choke. Then the choke goes gradually from there to 35 ticks past the 42 mark.

    Forcing cone is supposed to be opened up and I believe it because I can see it clearly even after thoroughly cleaning it with my bore snake. Polishing may be in order.
     
  18. tarheel

    tarheel Member

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    I would not be concerned about the release Tr.
    TRON WILL TAKE CARE OF THAT,DID I SAY TRON?

    Tarheel
     
  19. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Not sure what you mean there Tarheel. Please explain.

    Did find a reference to trigger work for this gun on line. Here's what the guy had to say in the thread referenced above. This is from post #5 (See the post numbers on the far right).

    "As I said, best bet, and first thing to do, is to take it apart, clean, lube, while you are in there if you take the trigger group completely apart, you can polish the SIDES of the trigger, hammer, etc. with exceptionally fine (1,000 to 2,000 grit) emery paper or polishing compound so that the parts slip past each other more smoothly. Don't mess with the sear angle, or its shelf, or mating surface on the trigger. The above plus the 500 round shooting break in, clean again and lube, will most likely have the trigger down to where you want it. If not, its time to take it to an experienced smith, or send it back to Browning."
     
  20. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Active Member

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    Here's Kip's idea.


    joekuhn_2008_030345.jpg


    The gun in the picture is a Browning Gold Hunter which has the same trigger as the Maxus. Notice the trigger screws are not parallel; one is higher than the other. If they were parallel, I'd turn that thing around, trim it off to be sure I don't get bumped in the nose and be happy.

    Still searching around for how to control empties. Options are rubber band, generic wire model shell catcher and Tron's welding nib inside the barrel. To get Tron to do it, I'd have to send the whole gun to his FFL so he could test it. I'm guessing he'd need to test it himself because he probably hasn't seen one of these. I'd be willing to do this down the road.

    Still working to get the extra weight into that stock.
     
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