1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

The kid's want a shot maker

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by jbmOU, Sep 24, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jbmOU

    jbmOU Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
    601
    A shotmaker is an excellent investment, but make sure you know what you are getting into before you purchase one. Getting the shotmaker is the easy part, you also have to find a steady supply of lead, set the shot maker up in a well ventilated area, and if you don't have a well ventilated area, then you have to put in some type of ventilation. Shotmaking is also a lot of work and with you making the shot for 14 kids, be prepared to spend a lot of time sitting in front of the shot maker, making shot.

    There are two types of shotmakers that I know of: Littleton and Jim Stewart. I feel that the Jim Stewart shotmaker is a better choice, it is made better and Jim is very nice to do business with, unlike littleton.

    Below are websites for the two types of shotmakers, I would recommend that you purchase a double bowl shotmaker that produces 90lbs an hour since you will be making it foir 14 kids. Good Luck!

    http://littletonshotmaker.com/

    http://www.geocities.com/jstewart1934/My_page.html
     
  2. plinker61

    plinker61 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    394
    forrest,where are you located?i would be interested in helping you get started,any thing to keep the kids shooting,mark
     
  3. Hipshot 3

    Hipshot 3 TS Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,796
    Smart kids!....What the hell....get 'em one!
     
  4. Doug Mc

    Doug Mc TS Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Messages:
    214
    Be aware just purchasing a shot maker gets you half way there -- there are many other items to purchase and build as well -- you need a stand to place it on -- a reservoir to drop the lead in -- a method to melt the lead and pour your ingots -- many gallons of the fluid to drop it in -- the shots has to be washed and dried -- tools to use when melting the lead -- a method to Graphite the shot -- it's not Brain surgery but there is a learning curve to do it right -- I agree with some of the others as far as Jim Stewart's unit -- it is the better one to buy -- I would also only allow adult supervision when making shot -- lead is hot and it burns -- kids may not use proper care when left on their own -- just my opinion take it or leave it
     
  5. famill00

    famill00 TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Messages:
    610
    First off...bump.


    Second off, It is nice to meet someone else named Forrest.

    Forrest
     
  6. Harold

    Harold TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    247
    I advise against it because of the health risk. I know too many people with lead in their blood from doing that, and kids can't always be trusted to follow the proper procedures.
     
  7. Gargoyle!

    Gargoyle! TS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2007
    Messages:
    980
    I say NO to letting the kid at that age make shot. It is not a safe thing even for us older people. I just don't want your son getting hurt. Getting scares from hot lead on the skin, lose an eye and so on. Then its the lead fumes. If you decide to let him do so take ALL safety measures you can to protect your kid. Making shot is not like painting easter eggs. Please becarefull.
     
  8. Doug Mc

    Doug Mc TS Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Messages:
    214
    As far as fumes go -- lead doesn't give off the bad stuff until it gets to 1100 degrees -- the heating unit does get it close to that --around 650/700 degrees -- but I still always do it in a well vented area with a fan behind placed so it is blowing out -- wear leather gloves -- keep from handling the lead by hand -- always wash your hands good before doing anything else -- use common sense
     
  9. avidtrapshooter

    avidtrapshooter TS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Messages:
    228
    I can vouch for scarring and burn part I got a few while I was wearing shorts (already a bad idea) and I knocked over an muffin pan with a couple molten ingots in it and some of it splashed on my hands and knees and now I have the scars to prove it. The moral of this story is wear as much protective gear as you can! Jeans, long sleeves, gloves and definately eye protection leave as little bare skin showing as possible, because when molten lead lands on it it really hurts!
    I also would not let them do it without adults around to keep an eye on them and make sure they ain't rough housing, being unsafe, etc. That's my 2 cents.
    Zane VM.
     
  10. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    8,371
    Personally, I think you'd be better off to have the kids round up the lead and have someone else make the shot for them on a 50/50 basis ... If the kids approach a business and ask for the lead I'd be willing to bet most would give it to them or charge them very little being as they are kids ... I have never made any but have watched others and can tell you one little slip and you got something to remember that day for the rest of your life in the way of a scar ... I have a friend thats doing exactly what I am suggesting you do and they are making out big time and don't have the head aches that goes with making the shot ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  11. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2006
    Messages:
    4,003
    Forrest Bump? (groan)
     
  12. roscoeparker

    roscoeparker Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    340
    They are not safe the kids could get burned and the lead fumes are not safe for them to breath.I would think twice, before buying one. Bill
     
  13. scott k

    scott k TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    Messages:
    229
    would you tell a kid who wants to learn how to weld, no?
    or paint a car? maybe how to use a cutting torch.
    sandblaster maybe?

    ever wonder why kids sit in the house and play video games, get fat and have no skills today?

    never tell a kid they can't do these things. take them buy the hand and teach them how to do it right and safe. you might be amazed.

    later scott
     
  14. avidtrapshooter

    avidtrapshooter TS Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2007
    Messages:
    228
    Scott you make an excellent point, I never even thought about that. I wouldn't be able to do half the junk I do now without getting a few burns, cuts, etc. but I went and built a shotmaker with some of the skills listed above just have to get around to testing it now. So yeah get the kids one and teach em how to use it properly.
     
  15. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    6,486
    Have you checked with the Chicoms?
     
  16. Ellen

    Ellen TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Messages:
    271
    I definitely recommend adult supervision-meaning the adult can not leave the processing area- till the "kids" are old enough to pay attention to what they are doing. They can't be joking around,goofing off during the entire process, talking on their cell phones, or playing with the girlfriend, or someone will get hurt. This is not a safe attitude much less a safe environment for them to make shot in. Adults shouldn't be imbibing in their favorite alcoholic beverage either when shotmaking.
    I do agree with Scott K though about teaching the kids properly and then they won't be couch potatoes. I would begin by having them scavenger for the wheel weights. Then watch as the lead is melted and poured into muffin pans. Even after the lead appears to have solidified in the muffin it is still extremely hot so touching is not advised.
    Shotmaking can be fun but you must be safe. As far as the fumes go, lead only gets to about 750-800 degrees max and you don't get off gases unless the lead reaches 1000- 1100 degrees.
    Happy Shotmaking!!!
     
  17. Ellen

    Ellen TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2006
    Messages:
    271
    I definitely recommend adult supervision-meaning the adult can not leave the processing area- till the "kids" are old enough to pay attention to what they are doing. They can't be joking around,goofing off during the entire process, talking on their cell phones, or playing with the girlfriend, or someone will get hurt. This is not a safe attitude much less a safe environment for them to make shot in. Adults shouldn't be imbibing in their favorite alcoholic beverage either when shotmaking.
    I do agree with Scott K though about teaching the kids properly and then they won't be couch potatoes. I would begin by having them scavenger for the wheel weights. Then watch as the lead is melted and poured into muffin pans. Even after the lead appears to have solidified in the muffin it is still extremely hot so touching is not advised.
    Shotmaking can be fun but you must be safe. As far as the fumes go, lead only gets to about 750-800 degrees max and you don't get off gases unless the lead reaches 1000- 1100 degrees.
    Happy Shotmaking!!!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.