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***THE FIGURE 8 ***

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Leo, Apr 4, 2009.

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  1. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    My "figure 8" has about 1 inch of rib showing in between the beads, but I seem to be able to break a lot of targets, many times all of them. Like the gentleman above stated, it is a matter of being consistant on your gun mount and watching the bird, not concentrating on the beads once the gun is in motion. The middle bead is only a tool to give you a reference to learn a consistant mount. Good luck
     
  2. SR1

    SR1 TS Member

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    The only figure 8 I worry about is the wad in my hulls.
     
  3. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    The figure 8 is the only constant you can use when comparing different makes and models when determining the GUNS point of impact.

    Other than that, how YOU will shoot a gun is entirely different.

    Doug
     
  4. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    IMHO, the idea of a figure 8 with the beads is only considered to ensure the rear sight (eye) is looking directly down the length of the barrel. Once you know that is so every tine you mount the gun, you can forget it. In other words, I don't check that "gun fit issue" when shooting clays...Bob Dodd
     
  5. Spanky

    Spanky Active Member

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    I've always related the fig. 8 as a gun positioning aspect, being on the stock correctly, setting up my hold point, and only comes into play just prior to calling pull. When the clay is in flight I'm not seeing or looking for any beads.
     
  6. tsosin

    tsosin TS Member

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    Point the shot gun, break the bird. Aim the shot gun, miss the bird. Beads are truly a mounting tool.
     
  7. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    The "figure 8" went out with the bath water. I used to ehar this at the club back in the 70's.

    The first time you buy the gun, the beads should line up to show you it is not canting left or right, after that you could throw the beads away.

    If you are getting on bead on top of the other, your gun is shooting too low for trap and particularly handicap.

    I have a mile of rib showing between my two beads. I think - (if I'd ever look at them).

    Once the gun is mounted, never look at them again. You shoot "off the end of the barrel" and in instinctive shooting, once the gun fits you it becomes a natural extension of your body.

    About the only time I ever see the end of my barrel is AFTER I shot, and am swinging through the target AFTER it breaks.

    If you are looking at beads in the act of shooting, you are either shooting one-eyed, or "aiming". The latter is BAD, BAD, BAD!

    Whiz
     
  8. 101voodoo

    101voodoo TS Member

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    Its not.

    Look where you normally do, keep looking there, mount the gun and call for the bird.

    If you've grooved your mount to be the same every time, the last thing you want to do is look back at the gun.

    Jim
     
  9. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    Figure 8 doesn't mean SQUAT.....but try convincing someone otherwise and you have your work cut out for you.
     
  10. kraiza

    kraiza Active Member

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    Whiz you couldn't of said it any better. Shotguns are pointed not aim. John
     
  11. acss

    acss Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    i recently dug thru my gun cabinet and pointed all the trapguns i own ( more than i care to admitt) all of differant makes ect- not one of those comes up a fiqure 8!!!! but i do think it or they is a refeance oint!
     
  12. waverider

    waverider Well-Known Member

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    HI
    With a fixed rib gun, the gun is supposed to pattern 60/40 at 40 yards when the beads are stacked to form a figure 8.

    Adjust the height of the comb to get the Point of Impact (POI) that works for you. How ever the beads look, you will have to remember that picture, to get the same POI every time you mount the gun.

    If you have an adjustable rib in addition to an adjustable comb you can adjust both to get the Point of Impact you want and get the beads to form a figure 8. It is easier to confirm a perfect mount by seeing a figure 8 than guessing the exact space needed.

    Jason
     
  13. acss

    acss Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    jason- thats a good answer!
     
  14. Shooting Jack

    Shooting Jack Active Member

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    I'm new to the game so what I'm about to say may be totally wrong but it is my take, simply put. If you look straight down the barrel/rib you will have the beads covering up(only see one) and you must black out the bird with the barrel to shoot and hit it. By adjusting the comb to a figure eight you can still see the bird above the end of the barrel and then can shoot it. This also will help teach you to keep the barrel moving as you shoot. Once the gun is adjusted I would think you wouldn't pay anymore attention to it. Jackie B.
     
  15. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Jason & Goose2,

    Quote-- "With a fixed rib gun, the gun is supposed to pattern 60/40 at 40 yards when the beads are stacked to form a figure 8.

    This is not always true, but more often, it is assumed. Any manufacturer can decide what their particular gun will shoot, if shot with a figure 8 sight picture. Some may not even care, because they know a shooter will adjust the comb of their gun, shoot from the front sight only, to whatever POI(point of impact) they are comfortable with.

    As I mentioned above, the only "good" thing that comes from shooting a gun with the figure 8, is when comparing different GUNS. The beads now become a "fixed standard", or a "base" from which all guns can be compared.

    To use an example of how this could play out, lets use a Rem 1100 and a Perazzi TM-1.

    Shooter A has a Rem 1100 for sale. If he states in his ad that this gun shoots 80% high...our continued questioning will go on for ever and ever, with question like....

    1)80%, at what distance?

    2)What is 80%? Is this the POI or is this the pattern density.

    3)With the beads in a Fig. 8?

    4)How much space do you have between the beads (this distance can be arguable).


    Shooter B has a Perazzi TM-1. Shooters A & B get together and decide to trade guns. Shooter B describes his gun the following matter...

    1)POI is 70% at 40 yds., based on a 30" circle. Center of pattern 6" high at 40yds.

    2)Gun was patterned from a rest, with the beads in a Fig. 8.

    3)Pattern density is 100% in the 30' circle.


    Shooter A decides he does not want to trade. Not understanding the "apples to apples" comparison, by patterning his GUN, he feels the Perazzi TM-1 will shoot too low for him.


    If shooter A were to have taken his gun out to the patterning board and recorded this information, he would have known that his Rem 1100 actually only shot 3" high at the 40yd distance, and by using a small movement in the comb of the Perazzi TM-1, he could have achieved his POI.


    With all of that said...no, you do not have to shoot any gun with the figure 8. You may really be comfortable with the gun you have, but wished for it to shoot higher or lower, you can move the comb. If this adjustment requires for you to see space between the two beads, so be it. It will not hinder you to any great degree. Personally, I do feel there is a limit, and only your shooting ability and scores will decide that for you. This limit is not on how high any gun should shoot, but the distance your eye is above the rib. It's possible to be so high above the rib, that it can be a hindrance for the eye to center itself directly to the center of the rib or bore.

    How high you want YOURSELF to shoot a trap gun is your preference. You do want some "built-in" elevation while trapshooting. Whether this comes from the GUN or from YOU, is your decision. The 60/40 (3" high at 40 yds), is the most common elevation you will see, and most guns on the market will be very close to this when shot in the figure 8 configuation(there are exceptions). As you become more experienced and competent with your shooting skills, you may find that adding a bit more to the height of your POI, may feel better. And, if this is the case, bumping the comb up a little will give you this.


    Doug Braker
     
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