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The difference between a Cynergy and a Citori

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by huntinandhotrods, Oct 18, 2010.

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  1. huntinandhotrods

    huntinandhotrods Member

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    This maybe a dumb question, but what is the difference between a Browning Cynergy and a Citori? I been looking at buying a Browning over/under and I see that you can get a cheaper Citori or a cheaper Cynergy for about the same price and they both have models that go up to $5000 to $6000. Are the actions the same? Do they shoot the same? Is it just feel and preference? Or is there a difference that I'm missing other than the shape of the stock?
    Thanks Huntinandhotrods!!
     
  2. benedict1

    benedict1 TS Member

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    Internally they are quite different. If you go to the Browning website you can open a pdf file with an exploded view of a Citori and a Cynergy and you'll see the differences right away. The Citori is the older gun having been first introduced in the early 70s. The Cynergy has been around about 6-7 years. The one I am selling below is a good shooter, I just can't handle the Unsingle barrel very well. I bought the Cynergy to try it out and now I know! There have been some problems with Cynergy trigger pulls not being up par. Mine was okay but I had the trigger adjusted by a first class gunsmith and they are now just as good as any Citori or BT 99 in my opinion. Hope this helps.
     
  3. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    The Cynergy's are also next to impossible to have a release trigger installed. So i have been told. To me the Cynergy gun looks cool but feels like crap when shouldered. Hard to beat the time proven Citori. IMHO---Matt
     
  4. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    Matt, what makes the Cynergy feel like crap when shouldered? Is it off balance? I am considering the Cynergy or a 683E combo.

    Also, I am assuming that the XT is a Citori?
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    calkidd---It is just a personal thing with me. I actually have a friend who has a Cynergy Trap Combo and shoots it quite well. For me i just couldn't get it to feel right. I couldn't tell if it was the stock system or LOP or what. Browning(at the Grand) even allowed me to adjust the comb and changed the spacers in the recoil pad system. Perhaps a gunsmith could get it to fit with some mods but i had lost hope by then. I believe the XT is just a variance of the Citori. I actually ended up buying a Beretta 682 Gold E Trap and am so glad i did. I think i finally found one i'll stick with awhile. Ok, i'll try to anyway. LOL---Matt
     
  6. Ted K.

    Ted K. Member

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    A Citori has a taller receiver and uses hammers to actuate the firing pins. The receiver on a Cynergy is smaller in the vertical dimension (and thus the barrels are closer together). I believe the Cynergy uses spring-driven direct acting firing pins. As I understand it, the Cynergy's shorter receiver is due to this firing pin arrangement. I suspect this is the reason it is so difficult to modify the trigger on a Cynergy.

    I also believe that the Cynergy is slightly lighter than the Citori, probably due to the smaller receiver.

    Any large dealer should have both models; if you put them next to each other on the counter, you will immediately see the difference.

    I have a Citori of my own, and a friend let me shoot a box of shells through his Cynergy for comparison. Unfortunately, since I am left handed and his gun was set up for a righty, all I learned was that the Cynergy makes the same noise as other shotguns.

    FWIW, I don't think either shotgun is inherently better or worse than the other, either in terms of design or quality of workmanship. Some people feel that the shorter receiver is a significant advantage; I couldn't line up the gun well enough to evaluate that.

    Ted K.
     
  7. Shooting Sailor

    Shooting Sailor Well-Known Member

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    I tried both the XT and Cynergy at the same time, but the Cynergy felt so much better when I shouldered them one after the other that I had to buy it.
    I shot my Citori quite well, and could have happily continued to do so for some years more, but when my wife said to buy a new trap gun for my retirement, I had to obey! I thought the XT would be my natural choice after all the years of shooting the Citori, but the Cynergy just felt a little more natural in my hands. Both came to my shoulder smoothly, both needed the comb offset about 1/4" to the right to align the beads perfectly, the palm swells filled my hand okay, but there was that niggly little difference. I finally figured out that the nose of the Cynergy's comb was a little further back making the wrist a tad longer and allowing me a more natural grip without the comb pushing on the ball of my thumb. It works well for me, as from the start of the season I have gone from D class to in and out of A class, depending on how well I shoot on any given weekend and have gotten 3 punches this year.
    Around here, Cynergys are becoming a very popular gun. The trigger horror stories may have been valid in the beginning, but I don't know anyone who has any complaint about the trigger in their Cynergy. Mine is good enough that I couldn't tell you what it feels like when I am shooting, as I don't notice it; I swing the gun, it goes off, and the bird should break. As for the difficulties of putting releases in Cynergys, there is a gunsmith locally who does them, and every one I have seen works very well. He doesn't seem to find it difficult, and the cost is reasonable.
    I think you should try them both out to see which one suits you best, and go with whichever you feel you prefer. You will be getting a good gun which will last you for years, whichever you choose.
     
  8. AEP

    AEP Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2009
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    I own a Cynergy and am very happy with it. Some like the Cynergy some hate it for what-ever reason. I would recommend you shoulder on and preferably shoot one. Just remember most guns will not fit you properly out of the box.

    If you like the Cynergy buy one. If you don't like the looks of it don't buy it. You will never be happy and will never shoot it well.

    It is my opinion all guns will shoot well if fitted to the shooter. I dought the shot going down the barrel knows the type and brand of gun its being shot out of.

    Good luck with your decission,
    Andy
     
  9. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Will you ever want/need a release trigger? If not, try and shoot both, and buy the one YOU prefer. Otherwise pass on the Cynergy

    Don Verna
     
  10. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Here's a bit of good advice for the Cynergy owners! I saved this guys post and share it occasionally when the topic comes up.

    Hap

    Subject: How to Reduce Browning Cynergy Trigger Pull
    From: AEP
    Email: Aepozzi@comcast.net
    Date: Sun, May 24, 2009 - 11:35 PM ET
    Website Address:

    Reducing Trigger Pull on Browning Cnyergy

    If you do the following procedure you will do it at your own risk. You may void your warranty. Browning Arms does not want you doing this. If you are not comfortable performing this kind of work, or don’’t understand these instructions Do not Proceed.

    You will need some tools. The tools needed are a dial caliper, small assortment of brass drifts, smooth face 6-8”” file, and a 4 or 6 oz ball peen hammer. All measurements are in inches.

    Adjusting the trigger pull on a Browning Cynergy is not difficult if you take your time and follow these instructions. The Cynergy, that I purchased, came with a trigger pull of 4.75 lbs and lots of ““trigger creep””. For me that is way too heavy. I prefer a 3 lb pull.

    Don’t bother calling Browning for help. They won’’t tell you anything. I called 10 gun shops around the country, some were Browning authorized repair facilities, and no one seemed to know or wouldn’’t tell me how to reduce trigger pull.

    Prior to starting check the current trigger pull. Check each trigger at least 3 times. Write down your findings. Both triggers should be the same. If not no problem you will be able to adjust later. To start with remove the recoil pad and butt stock. As of this writing, there seems to be 3 configurations of recoil pads. My recoil pad had the traditional #2 phillips head screws top and bottom. Prior to inserting the screwdriver put a little 3 in one oil on the tip and shank of the screwdriver. This will prevent tearing the recoil pad. Once the pad is removed remove the butt stock. My Cynergy came with a long allen wrench to remove the socket head screw located in the butt. Make sure the break open tang is in the closed position. This will save your stock upon removal of the butt stock.

    Once the butt stock is removed take a good look at the internal mechanism. You will notice it is different than most trigger mechanisms. Pay close attention to where and how the sear engages the firing spring. This will be the spring with the castle nuts and a cotter pin. First you want to start by removing the sears. The sears are held in place by a pin with an e-clip on the right side of the receiver. The pin goes through both sears. On the opposite side of the e-clip is a head to hold the pin in place. Remove the e-clip. Be careful. This little clip will shoot across the room when removing it. Try and hold your hand over the side the clip is coming off to prevent loosing it.

    Once the clip is removed use a brass punch and drive the pin out. The pin is knurled under the head side to keep it from moving. This will require a little force to drive the pin out. A 4 ounce hammer should work fine. The sears rest against the firing pin, which are spring loaded. When you drive the pin out the brass driver will hold the sears in place. Once the pin is removed the sears will be resting on the brass driving punch. Slowly remove the brass driver. Now the sears are free to come out with a little jiggle. I will remove the one on the left side first. Mark-it and then remove the other sear and mark it so you know which side they came out of.

    Once the sears are out now is a good time to start working on them. Start with the first one you removed. If you have excessive trigger creep, as mine did, now is the time to improve it . Using a dial caliper take a measurement from the back side of the sear, on the flat, to the tip of the sear. It should measure .035 +/-. Mine was .044. using a ““smooth”” file remove the excess from the sear. Keep the sear face square to the file. Only make 2 passes and then re-check the thickness and squareness to the file.

    If you get a little off here it can be corrected. Make sure where you filed is even across the face of the sear. If not adjust your file cut to square it up. With 2 passes on the file you should have removed about .001-.002 depending on the condition of your file and amount of pressure you applied. Always keep your file clean of chips. If you removed .002 on your first 2 file cuts and everything is pretty square continue filing.

    You may want to make 4 passes then re-check measurements. Keep filing until you reach a thickness of .026. When you reach .026 stop filing and start honing with a stone. I uses a course stone to bring sear down to .025. When I have reached .025 I then hone with a medium stone. (medium stone being 220 grit). I medium stone until I reach .024. That is where I stop. I could have gone a little further maybe down to .020.

    Next I medium stone the part of the sear that rests against the ball end of the firing pin. Holding the sear square to the medium stone hone until the face is slick and shinny. I’’m not sure this part is necessary , but it can’’t hurt. The 1st sear is now finished. Repeat this process on the other sear. Remember take your time. Don’’t get in a hurry. If in doubt re assemble and test fire or at least dry fire with a snap-cap. If you reassemble and test with a trigger pull gauge you will notice your trigger pull has been reduced by approximately ½ lb. To Reduce the Pull of the Trigger

    Remove the pin that holds the firing pins. This pin is located below in about the middle of the receiver, just forward of the upper part of the trigger sears. The one pin holds both sears. Again you want to drive the pin out with a brass drift. The firing pins are spring loaded. As you drive the pin out apply pressure on the ball end, of the firing pin. The ball rests against the sears. This will keep the firing pin from shooting across the room and keep the holding pin from galling the firing pin while removing. Take note on how the firing pins are installed. The firing pins have a relief cut in where the pin goes through. This relief holds the firing pins in place. Once the pin is out the firing pins should slide right out. With the firing pins out you may need to place the receiver in an up right position to remove the firing pin springs. Measure the springs with a dial caliper for length. You will not get an accurate measurement but close enough. Close the calipers until they just touch the springs. Try not to compress the spring, however, you will compress the spring a little maybe .001 - .005. I doubt this slight compression will make a difference in trigger pull.

    I cut my springs off to a length of .840. This gave me a 3 lb trigger pull. Over time this will lighten up a bit. Maybe to a point that I will need to replace the springs to maintain a 3 lb trigger pull. I would suggest cutting the springs to .940 length. Then completely reassemble and test.

    I cut both springs to the same length. By making your first cut on the springs at .940 +/- and reassembling you will be able to tell is one spring needs to be cut a little shorter to match the other spring. Some prefer a harder trigger pull on the second shot. It’’s up to you and your preference. My guess is a .940 spring length will equal to a 3 ½ lb trigger pull.

    If you cut the springs a little short, a quick fix would be to shim with small washers, or turn some shims down on a lathe to thickness to obtain the desired trigger pull.

    When reinstalling the firing pins make sure to pay attention to the slot in the firing pin that the holding pin goes through. You will need to compress the firing pins to allow the holding pin to drive back in. Failure to do this will result in damage to the firing pins.

    As stated above my Cynergy is now set to a 3 lb trigger pull. I left the slightest amount of trigger creep for safety and wear reasons.

    On May 24, 2009 I tested the trigger modifications. I am happy to report all is fine. The lighter trigger pull feels a lot better to me.

    Good Shooting Andy
     
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