1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

The allure of fine shotguns

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bushmaster1313, Mar 17, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,605
    I am 52 years old and until I bought a then 51 year old Ithaca 37 as a present for my 51st birthday I had never even held what could be remotely considered a fine shotgun. Now I am hooked.

    But what is the reason we are so drawn to these mere artifacts of wood and steel. Is it the beauty, the technology, the craftsmanship, the exclusivity, the perfection or the friendship that fine guns foster?

    Of course, the correct answer is: "Yes to all of the above".

    However, I submit that there is something else that is much more subtle and much more special. Family and friends come first, but of all my material posssions, fine guns, especially shotguns, give me the opportunity to reflect on how blessed and fortunate we are to have the peace, prosperity, liberty and health to enjoy the gift of our fleetingly brief lives in this beautiful and magnificent world.

    Today is the anniversary of the very tragic death of my wife's little brother.

    Lou
     
  2. jsa3107

    jsa3107 TS Supporters TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    364
    Location:
    Maine
    Sorry about the loss in your family

    I think that when you own a fine firearm it is alot of things
    A fine firearm is made to last
    A fine firearm has a certain status to it
    A fine firearm will gain value
    A fine firearm will let you shoot many many rounds and will not break( I know they all break in time)
     
  3. Big Az Al

    Big Az Al Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2006
    Messages:
    1,297
    Location:
    near Tucson Trap
    I have known, have and had several truly good friends, several truck loads of incredable memories!

    All due to, because of, and many many around, "FIREARMS: the repair of and the safe use of firearms, in target shooting and hunting"!

    I am drawn to look at firearms of all types, the run of the mill junk will quickly loose my interest, while the good working to FINE will hold me for awhile.

    My personal preffrence is to solid working, while not classy looking Hunting and entry level target. While I enjoy looking at handling and on accasion shooting a higher grade fine firearm. But I grew up hunting in an area where even the grass seems to have iron in it to scratch the finish of the hardest steel, so I leave the truly High grade to others and am happy with what I know I will enjoy!

    Although looking at admiring and sometimes drooling over (hopefully not on) Those incredably fine fire arms that are out there is good fun also!

    Al
     
  4. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2006
    Messages:
    10,650
    It is like looking at a piece of art, which I submit they are. The beauty of the craftmanship brings a rarity,,,,like looking a woman,,,,the prettier, the longer the look.

    BTW,,,,this thread is worthless without pictures!!!!!!!!!
     
  5. jbmi

    jbmi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,452
    My Parker SXS 16ga VH is 100 years old this year. I truly marvel at the workman ship, fit and finish of this gun knowing so much of it was done by hand and not some state of the art CNC machine. It's hard to believe that such a gun sold for $50 back in 1909 and remains very shootable 100 years later. The workmanship puts some of todays guns to shame.
     
  6. Dbl Auto

    Dbl Auto Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2009
    Messages:
    1,289
    Location:
    NW Ohio
    I am in awe of the Browning Double Automatic. I took apart the Brown DA shown in this pic on Sunday and love the hand fitted and well crafted parts. These guns are about fifty years old. Another thing that fine firearms due is remind the owner of family members no longer with us. My Grandfather that I never knew bought a Double Auto new in 1961. He and my Father thought the Green DA's were ugly and he bought a Dragon Black trap grade DA. My Father still has this trap gun and I have started a collection of my own DA's. BTW I really like the Green one!
    Doug
     
  7. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,605
    Here is a picture of a gun made by someone who loved their work
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Messages:
    3,518
    And I think there are some other compelling reasons fine guns give satisfaction. I was speaking to an American gunmaker last Saturday; the gentleman has made less than 150 SBT trapguns. He pointed out that the market for expensive target guns is limited. Most shotguns go to the field and are not expensive. Most shotgun owners in this country feel that the old smoothbore that has been passed down for two, three, generations, is the finest ever...even if it takes maybe ten shots per year. Most shotguns in this country are either for defense or for gathering meat or both.

    But a tournament grade shotgun, beautifully made, be it by hand, CNC, or mill and file, is a different and beautiful animal that is purpose built. In my case, I know I will never own a 100K dollar Porsche, Vette Z06, or Boyd Coddington built hot rod. But I can own a high grade tournament grade shotgun that is smaller, yet a type of high perfomance and exclusive machine in its own right. A firearm that has and will last 200,000 rounds with next to no maintainence is a mechanical jewel and usually a work to behold. In my case and in my stubborn opinion, I say thanks to Mr. Alfermann, Mr. Bowen, Mr. Cole, Dennis deVault, Mr. Ljutic, and Mr. Seitz for building some special stuff.

    And after that come the memories and friendships gleaned while shooting and a lust to own at least one fine, higher grade shotgun that was mostly hand made. Works of art...

    Reminds me, back in college, one of my professors had a rich wife. Each year, when he went to England, he'd pick up a custom built "London Gun"...shotgun, just to put away 'cause he liked he art. He was not a shooter, but a fan of fine machinery.
     
  9. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,784
    They are just tools. Some are beter than others, but, never-the-less, just tools.
     
  10. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Messages:
    3,518
    ...if I had the time and local convenience of bird hunting, and I would, I'd surely use a fine engraved gun if I had one. But I'd likely get "hunting wood" for the gun and put any super expensive and fancy wood away. I know of a guy who did that with a fancy P gun in trap; he just bought plain wood and put the exhibition grade away! Why not, sounds like a good compromise...and consider, junky looking wood may make the super treasure of a gun less attractive to sticky hands.
     
  11. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,784
    SARGE: Value is in the mind of the owner. One man's junk is another's treasure. An ugly woman can be just as appealing as a beauty. It's all in a man's taste. I think a gun is a tool, nothing more. The color in the wood or the gold engraving mean nothing to me. Does it do the job and not break while doing it. That is the question. An frankly, that's all I care about.
     
  12. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,959
    Some of the workmanship in the prewar guns I still marvel at. My 1904 W C Scott and Son 12 ga boxlock is a marvel to look inside.

    The inletting is better than if it were done on a cnc. I made the comment to my friend Steve Milton of Precision Arms Canada that I was ashamed as a Stockmaker to admit I couldn't do that kind of quality work( atleast not make money at it) when he explained this to me. Stockers in those days were paid a piece rate which was the equivalent to 26-40 hrs labor to stock a particular model shotgun. The stocker apprenticed on that one receiver and only worked on one model It didn't matter if it took him 3 days or three weeks to complete the job if it didn't pass inspection he ate the job and started over. Since they were working on one gun model they had tools specialized for just that job. Now the checkering and finish weren't so hot but the inletting and metal work would almost make you cry. I should mention that Steve was a barrel maker for Purdy I think.

    Give me an old English double and I can spend hours just looking at it.

    Joe
     
  13. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Messages:
    3,518
    This thread reminds me of what the late Don Zutz wrote. To paraphrase, he was greeted by a young man on a country road when he was hunting. The young man asked Don if he were afraid of scratching up his nice Merkel hunting gun. Zutz asked the young man the same thing about his prepared 4x4 truck. The young man said no, he built the truck to perform offroad. Zutz then said the same thing. He was scared of NOT getting a scratch now and then on the Merkel; he wanted to get USE out of the nice Merkel. They both agreed that they wanted performance from their machines. And, perhaps, a vehicle too nice to drive or a shotgun too nice to use are really just an assemblage of new parts and, hence, a bit stagnant like stuff in a museum.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.