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Target Setting

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Jon Reitz, Nov 24, 2009.

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  1. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    Need some help understanding the proper method for target setting when it comes to angles. The ATA rulebook says that area BDEFGHB = the area of a legitimate target, whereas BEFGB = the most desirable area in which to throw a target. Please decipher that for the benefit of my ignorance. If you don’t know, please don’t reply.

    Thanks,

    Jon Reitz
     
  2. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    I put spots of red spray paint inside of posts one and five exactly where a straight-a-way should be the greatest angle, ACCORDING TO THE RULE BOOK'S ILLUSTRATION and AFTER CENTERING the field. You'll be good to go.
     
  3. setter

    setter Member

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    First, establish point F. Locate the mid-line of the trap house. Measure from post 3 at the edge of the 16 yd line thru the mid-line of the trap 66 yd's. This is point F.

    At this time place an "X" on the trap house 16 yd's from post 3, lining up thru the mid-line (this is point "B").

    Measure 45 ft to the right of point F, extend a line 50 yd's from point "B"; and, where the 45 ft line from point "F" and the 50 yd line from point "B" intersect, place a pin flag or something more permanent. Repeat for the left side.

    Now the challenge becomes to "set" your trap to throw the extreme angles no less than the angle established be the pin flags. If this is a Pat-Trap, jump pins 2 and 3 of the interrupter bridge and the trap will cycle from limit switch to limit switch.

    When the trap reaches a limit, flip the auto/manual switch to manual. Place a target on top of "B", stand 3.5 ft to the right of post 1 (3.5 feet to the left of post 5 for the left angle). Sight thru the target and the pin flag, throw a target and adjust the limit switches until the angles are at these positions.

    Remember that you look at the first 15 to 20 yd's of target flight not where the target lands.

    Jim

    Edit: You can do this without establishing the angle stakes; just use the "target" at point "B" as reference and adjust the trap accordingly.
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Another way is that every time I am shooting on posts one or five, I pay close attention to the angles thrown to every other shooter. The field should be set to throw slightly less than a straight away target from these posts. It is simple to visualize where point B is on the trap roof. If I have time, I will do the same thing by standing behind the squad that shoots in front of my squad.

    If shooters would take the time (+- 15 minutes) to understand where the targets should be thrown, and then look at the targets of others to see if they are set correctly, setting targets would become much easier for a club. Unfortunately, most shooters will do neither. A person setting the traps early in the morning can set the speed and height, but checking the angles is difficult. I need Jim to teach me how to jump the trap over to the maximum angles. I know how to electrically jump interrupter pins but after setting the traps, I have to get the microphones out and load the traps-- I have limited time.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Remember this, when you finnish setting the targets, check to see if they look good. HMB
     
  6. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for the input and feedback thus far, and happy Thanksgiving to everyone.

    What I'm trying to understand is whether the goal should be to set the angles so the targets fall into area BDEFGHB (the area of a LEGITIMATE target), or should they be set to fall into area BEFGB (the area of the most DESIRABLE target). Which is correct?

    Thanks again,
    Jon Reitz
     
  7. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Jon, Generally speaking, you are looking for a field width of aproximately station 1 1/2 and station 4 1/2. Pat Ireland many months ago remarked how he would score from those posititions `for a while to see if the fields were centered. That to me made the most sense of being able to check to see if a Pat trap was centerd properly. Good luck, Bob
     
  8. mkstephen

    mkstephen Active Member

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    You should set the angles to BEFGB (the area of the most DESIRABLE target). This would correspond to a #2 hole target on a Winchester hand set trap. If the machine then occasionally throws a target within the BDEFGHB (the area of a LEGITIMATE target) the target is still legal but not preferred.


    If you set the angles to BDEFGHB (the area of a LEGITIMATE target) you are setting the angles too wide.


    Nothing a mechanical machine does is perfect so the DESIRABLE area is what you would like all of the time with the LEGITIMATE area being the occasional target that may go out of these limits and still be legal. Any target out of the LEGITIMATE area is illegal - providing the shooter doesn't shoot at it.
     
  9. setter

    setter Member

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    Jon,

    mkstephen is on target, its BEFGB. But always keep it mind it is the first 15 to 20 yards of target flight, not where it lands.

    Pat,

    Once the angles on a Pat-Trap are set, they seldom, if ever, need to be reset. Pull the interrupter (bright shiny gizmo inside the gray box at back of machine, its on the far right side). Looking at the pins of the interrupter, they are numbered. Jump pins 2 and 3 on the bridge where the interrupter plugs in, machine is on and cocked, auto/manual switch is set to auto. Flip switch to manual whem limit switch is reached. I modify an interrupter for this purpose.

    Also, Pheasantmaster has my Pat-Trap manual with a picture of this (it was on TS.COM at one time).

    Regards,
    Jim
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Jim- Pat Trap angles do not tend to change by themselves--- but, several shooters have keys to the club and a few of them like to play games by setting the trap to do unusual things.

    Another note-- A few months ago I watched a person trying to narrow the too wide angles by moving the stops but, the problem was a worn brush. It is always easier to correct a problem once you figure out what the problem is.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. setter

    setter Member

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    Pat,

    I'm reminded of the time I was doing trap maintenance, and I turned the machine on to run and cock. Would not cock. Thought I had a big problem. Checked oil level, this was a metal tank. There was none, nary a drop. Also this trap house was spotless. It must have evaporated - LOL.

    Just mark the limit switch positions with your favorite color Sharpie.

    Jim

    (Just a note - don't tighten the allen screw to prevent the limit switch from being moved, over time it can distort the sensitivity of the switch.)
     
  12. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    All,

    I appeciate everyone's help, and in particular the meaningful comments from mkstephen & setter. Personally I was leaning toward what mkstephen said, which was to set the angles to BEFGB (the area of the most DESIRABLE target), and that's how I set them. Setter brings up an excellent point as well though. The first 15-20 yards are really what matters, especially on a windy day. Good input.

    Thanks again,

    Jon Reitz
     
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