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Switching to two eyes...Thoughts?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Lovemy99, Mar 5, 2012.

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  1. Lovemy99

    Lovemy99 Member

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    I have been shooting with one eye closed now for 30+ years. Just the way I was trained and have never thought about changing...until now. I have diabetes and have been recently diagnosed with Diabetic Retinopathy, which causes blood vessels to burst in my retinas. This requires laser surgery to clean them up.

    I have begun to notice a change in my shooting. It seems that I am having a little trouble picking up the bird out of the house and getting on it as quickly as I used to. This is putting a strain on my right eye, I think, as it is the one doing all of the work. I start off strong in singles, but the last 25 give me fits, as my right eye starts to "give out" somewhat.

    My solution..switch to both eyes open. Any thoughts on helping to make this transition smoother and easier? I shot 4 rounds this weekend in practice using two eyes and was 4-5 birds off my normal average/round, which is frustrating. I have about 10 weeks until the SC State Shoot. I want to be ready for that. Any advice is appreciated.

    Scott
     
  2. Rich219

    Rich219 Active Member

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    Switching to two eyes was the best thing I've ever done. One day I just decided I was going to do it and never went back to shooting one eye. The first week or two was rough but after about 6-8 weeks I'm shooting as well as I was with one eye and I no longer have trouble seeing the bird like I often did when using one eye. I also feel like I'm getting on and breaking the bird much quicker.
     
  3. Lou Tenant

    Lou Tenant Active Member

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    I found it easier with two eyes, and I won't go back
     
  4. pigkiller

    pigkiller Member

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    I too switched to two eyes recently. Although my scores improved, don't be surprised if your scores drop significantly the first weeks or months. This is natural when you make a dramatic change of this nature.

    I will never shoot one-eyed again. I owe that decision in part to the encouragement of my coach and the observations made by Dr. Wayne F. Martin in his "Insight to Sports: Featuring Trapshooting and Golf," which should be required reading for all trapshooters, especially those considering switching to two eyes. It explains how you are visually cheating yourself by shooting with only one eye. Best book on trap I've ever read.
     
  5. Oscar Ray

    Oscar Ray TS Member

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    I changed to two eyes last year (my 2nd year shooting) and am glad I did. I see the bird much quicker and alot better with 2 eyes. It took about 2 weeks of shooting before i got comfortable with it but I will not go back to 1 eye, it now feels weird.

    Oscar
     
  6. ysr_racer

    ysr_racer Active Member

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    It took me a while, but now I can't even think about shooting with just one eye.

    When you play baseball, do you look at the bat or the ball? With 1 eye or 2?

    When you play golf, do you look at the club head or the ball? With 1 eye or 2?

    When you play tennis, do you look at the racket or the ball? With 1 eye or 2?

    When you merge onto the freeway, do you look at the hood of your car or where you want to go ? 1 eye or 2?

    Are you starting to see a pattern here?

    Look at your target and your brain will do the rest. Yes, I know, it’s not for everybody, but give it a try for a few months.

    Now onto something else. After you hit the ball with the (bat, club, racket) do you stop dead in your tracks, or do you follow thru?

    You follow thru.

    Same thing in sporting clays, if you stop the gun, you probably shot behind the target.

    Oh, I'm right handed and right eye dominant. Since we all have two eyes and they're next to each other you're going to see two images of the barrel. It's called parallax.

    Look at the bird, not the barrel.

    The front bead fell off my gun, and I won my class in last year's CA State Sporting Clays Championship.


    [​IMG]
     
  7. pitt4570

    pitt4570 Member

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    stick with it, it just takes time
     
  8. jdsfarms

    jdsfarms Well-Known Member

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    I made the switch ,I have to use a dot to keep from cross firing but 2 eyes is worth the effort stick with it.Jerry
     
  9. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote><I>"I made the switch ,I have to use a dot to keep from cross firing but 2 eyes is worth the effort stick with it."</I></blockquote>Small dot or completely blocking off the lens whole lens, you're STILL looking at everything that matters with just one eye!

    Cross eye dominance goes on in the brain; people who aren't truly cross eye dominant but have been using only 1 eye to shoot may be able to convert to keeping both eyes open.

    People who are truly cross eye dominant to any degree may THINK they can successfully shoot with both eyes open but the the off-eye gremlins will always return and the "mystery misses" will still occur.

    Keller
     
  10. kraiza

    kraiza Active Member

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    Two I eye shooting is the only way to go.
     
  11. Border Bandit

    Border Bandit Well-Known Member

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    If you have a medical reason to make the switch, doing so beats quitting, because that's where you were headed. I'm diabetic also, and starting to exhibit the same symptoms; but hopefully can continue one eyed. For those who flat out say, two eyed is the only way to shoot, I'll offer up a name: Nora Ross.

    best...mike
     
  12. guinner16

    guinner16 TS Member

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    "Two I eye shooting is the only way to go."

    Yeah that Nora Ross really struggles with the one eye thing.
     
  13. 391 shooter

    391 shooter Well-Known Member

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    Lovemy99
    Good Luck
     
  14. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    I love the way some of you make it sound like it is this magical thing and going from one eye shooting to two eye was just like snapping your fingers. Those of you have to realize that if you are successful in just a matter of weeks in shooting with two eyes, sounds like you should have been doing that all along.

    There are some of us that shooting with two eyes just isn't going to happen.

    Bryan
     
  15. Sam Ogle

    Sam Ogle Member

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    It isn't easy to switch. Give it time. I remember a comment from one of the Olympic Shooting Coaches: "When you walk down a flight of stairs, do you close one eye and cock your head sideways?.....No? Then why do you do it when you shoot?"

    Two eyes give much better depth perception, and you see the target much easier.
    That's why God gave us two eyes.

    Sam Ogle, Lincoln, NE
     
  16. Calkidd

    Calkidd Well-Known Member

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    Sam, you used the analogy about walking down a flight of stairs. What in the heck does that have to do with shooting trap? Does walking down stairs require the use of an object to point at another object and then fire that said object?

    I don't believe the analogizes of hitting a base ball or kicking a ball etc. The sport of trapshooting requires the use of two objects all within the same plane of sight.

    There has been a discussion of depth perception in the past. In short the use of depth perception is trapshooting is not really being used. You're not judging the target's distance to figure out when to shoot. You are using target acquisition to do this.
     
  17. blade819

    blade819 Well-Known Member

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    Here we go again! No one asked what his dominant eye is! Essential. If you are left eye dominant and right hand shooter you will not shoot sucessfully with 2 eyes open. Vice versa on the other side.

    blade819
     
  18. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    My older brother always shot with his left eye closed and did extremely well doing so. He switched to both eyes and it took around a thousand targets before it began working good for him. People such as Nora will never be able to make such a switch that are off hand eye dominate.

    The easiest way to learn how to shoot with both eyes open (excluding off eye dominate people) is using a scoped .22 keeping both eyes open to acquire and make the shots at still targets. That simple technique trains the master eye in how to acquire the proper sight picture quicker. Once that becomes easier to do repeatedly, the move to a shotgun will be an easier transition too.

    It helps too when making that switch to use the upper body tank turret lock with the shotgun. Nothing from the shoulders up move independently (EXCEPT) the eyes to lock on the target, have patience to allow the upper body and gun to catch up with your lightning fast eyesight to make the correct correlation. If you expect instant success, keep your off eye closed!

    We were shooting an ATA event one day and I asked my brother afterward if he was closing his left eye? He stated I didn't think about it but no, he didn't close the left eye and shot a very good score. He said; "I didn't even think about it"! As simple as it sounds because we're talking about our eyesight we use all the time, it takes time to re-learn how to see with master eye intensity when intersecting two separate moving objects at the proper time! Changing someones mind is a much tougher chore once they've made up their mind something different can't possibly work for them? Good luck!

    Hap
     
  19. RobertT

    RobertT Well-Known Member

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    Scott, sounds like you have all the motivation needed to shoot with both eyes. Keep at it and you should succeed. After time you may want to try a bead blinder or tape to keep your non dominant eye from seeing the bead. I too was one eye trained. Switched to two eyes with moderate success until cross firing became an issue, now I'm back to one eye. As long as I'm having fun I'll keep shooting. I even learned to shoot right handed "I'm a lefty" just in case something unforseen forces me to switch sides.

    Robert
     
  20. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote><I>"The easiest way to learn how to shoot with both eyes open (excluding off eye dominate people) is using a scoped .22 keeping both eyes open to acquire and make the shots at still targets. That simple technique trains the master eye in how to acquire the proper sight picture quicker. Once that becomes easier to do repeatedly, the move to a shotgun will be an easier transition too."</I></blockquote>That may be true of you but it's a gross over-simplification to say that it will work for other people, too.

    I've been shooting rifles and pistols since I entered the Army in 1966. I have always shot both with both eyes open (right eye dominant) both scoped and open sights and NEVER have any hint of cross dominance. When I began shooting a shotgun for sport in the 80s I found that my left eye was sometimes taking over. I can put the shotgun down, pick up my match rifle, put my right eye to the scope and put 5 in the center at 500 yards with both eyes open. Pick up the shotgun again and shoot way behind every left angle I get unless I cover the left eye.

    I shoot WAY more scoped rifle than I do shotgun so if it was going to help my cross firing a shotgun I would expect it would have by now. Don't know why it happens with only a shotgun but it does. It's been that way for 25+ years and it's likely going to stay that way.

    Keller
     
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