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Suggestions for shortgun for 8+ year old?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by rhymeswithorange, Jan 10, 2010.

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  1. rhymeswithorange

    rhymeswithorange Member

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    I'd also be interested in some ideas, I have an 8-year old (boy).
     
  2. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

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    Tae Kwon Do and guns,,,,Don't worry about her, worry for the boys,,,,BT Micro or maybe an 1100 with a cutdown stock....
     
  3. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    I would suggest a 20g youth model 1100 or better yet a 28, not much recoil on either. I started with a single shot 410, moved up to the 20 gauge single shot and it stomped me in the ground..lol..
     
  4. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest a single shot 22 caliber rifle. Some instruction on the safe handling of a fire arm and a little target practice. If she enjoys shooting you can then move on to a small guage shotgun. I do not believe 8 year olds and 12 guage trap guns are ment for each other. HMB
     
  5. coveybuster

    coveybuster Member

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    My wife (5'3" 110 lbs) Started with a 28" 20ga Beretta 686 Onyx Pro. I cut it off, but not so short that I couldn't still shoot it, and put a kickeez pad on it. Yeah, it's a field gun, but it's versitile. I shoot the occasional round of skeet with it and it busts the doves and quail.

    I wouldn't limit her with a "speciality" gun if she is just starting out. My wife has graduated to a 32" 1969 BT-99 that has a 13.5 LOP, modified choke, and the forcing cone smoothed out. It is a great 16 - 20 yard gun for her.

    My best advice; let her find the gun. What you think she needs, is not what she wants, or what feels right to her. Have her shoulder some different guns and feel the difference. The look on her face will tell you when you've got a winner. If she doesn't like it she won't shoot it. Trust me. Remember it's her gun.

    My wife broke 3/25 the first time she shot. Don't let her get discouraged if she isn't all over them the first time out, or the first year. Good Luck & get that little lady shootin'.
    MAC
     
  6. yvonne

    yvonne Banned User Banned

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    My first shotgun was a Mossberg 9200 youth bantam. I think the barrel length was 24". It was an auto....no kick...didn't weigh alot and shot everytime with no problems. Wish I still owned it! I never shot a 25 with it but shot many 24's in trap and skeet! I also duck hunted with it!
     
  7. cotton

    cotton Member

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    Congratulations on having a daughter interested in the shooting sports. It must make you proud and a little nervous. Nervous because you now have the challenge of making it a total pleasure for her. Anyway, my 2 cents on a gun. I would recomend the Beretta 3901 RL. This gun comes in 12ga., 26-28" barrels, adjustable comb, adj. pull length 12-13", and adj. cast. The gun will grow with her, and the 12ga. with 7/8 international loads will crush any target. The recoil on the 12 will be less than the 20. My son started last year at age 9. He is very small, 48lbs., he could not hold the auto. I got him a CZ Redhead in 20ga, with 26" barrels. He shoots the winchester feathers when we can. Standard 7/8oz. loads beat him up. We cut the stock some 4" and fits him well. He can open the action, but not close it. We shoot the 4-H shooting games and break some 35-40%. When he grows, I will have to change the gun he shoots or get a new stock. With the Beretta, the gun will grow with her. I recommend the 12ga. because of recoil issues. The gas gun and shooting 7/8 or light 1oz loads will produce less recoil than the 20. Plus the shells are easier to find and cheaper. If you have any questions, feel free to ask, I have a passion for helping the young 4-Her's enjoy the shooting heritage as much as I do. I apologize for the lengthy response. Good luck. Danny Peugh
     
  8. shooter66

    shooter66 TS Member

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    My son is around that age (9). I have him in a .410 for now. Its light he can carry it and it dosent hit him hard. I have a cut down mossberg 20ga pump but its to heavy. One thing you really need to keep in mind is not recoil but gun weight itself. If they get tired it ruins the expierance.

    The .410 he shoots is a cheap Rossi 99.00 at Gander Mountain. I figure he will outgrow it by next fall but its a great way for him to learn proper gun handling and to shoot without picking up bad habits and Im not out but 100.00 when he out grows it.

    I will be in the market for an LT 1100 20ga this summer.



    [​IMG]


    Scott
     
  9. Ajax

    Ajax Well-Known Member

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    Remington makes an 870 in 20 gauge that is an inch shorter than their youth model. If I remember right it has a 12 1/2 LOP and a 20 3/4 inch barrel. I bought one for my Grandson. You can find it on their website.

    The problem with just cutting a stock down when they are that young the hand grip is still made for an adult and it's hard to hold and reach the trigger properly.

    Ajax
     
  10. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    1100 20 gauge special field- and cut down the stock

    its lighter( 23 or 26 inch barrels with choke tubes)- and the 20 gauge round gives less recoil- and its cheaper actually-

    that gun balances well-


    you can give the gun to them with a regular length stock when they get older if they are still shooting

    regards from Iowa
     
  11. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I agree with EE, kids and field stocks is asking the kid to quit early. John, I'd choose the lightest semi-auto I could find, short barrel with tubes and a built up comb to match a small face and stature. Don't buy into the common belief that shorter barrels won't break targets with authority either, they will!! Keep the payload and velocity down at the start and your daughter will have a great beginning experience!! Prepare to buy two if you get the first one started correctly though!!!!! All my best my friend!

    Hap
     
  12. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    Having the upper body strength to lift one, I would echo the choice of a quality semi-auto 12/20 gauge and load/buy lightest 12/20 gauge loads that are appropriate for the shooting you'll do...

    We all talk about recoil... and although heavier, the 12 gauge semi action will lessen felt recoil. The 12 gauge capacity will make breaking targets easier and its the gauge for trap... and a gun she'll continue to grow with.

    My $0.02 on the matter,

    Jay
     
  13. ks5shooter

    ks5shooter Member

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    Get an old H@R single shot and cut the stock.You can get them for 50 bucks or so .When she grows out of it sell it to the next guy who needs it for a little one.
     
  14. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    They make a Pink and Laminated stock in 22 caliber, my local gun store has both. They are for a very small person.





    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  15. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

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    Beretta 3901 RL with a modified choke and 7/8 ounces of 8 1/2 or 9 shot.
     
  16. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    The main considerations for starting out a young person are do they have the physical strength to do it and do they have the mental maturity to accept the training. The photo above looks like the answer is yes to both questions.

    Now as the the shotgun, find a 70's vintage LT20 M1100 Remington. I got one for my daughter and it is working out wonderfully. If and when she outgrows the gun you will have no problem selling it to some other dad for what you paid for it. (I think I will hang on to the one I got, pretty good quail gun). The stock will probably need to be modified to fit her frame but that is easily done.

    The thing I really like about the autoloader for the beginner is that you can easily run it as a single shot and the bolt locks back after each shot. This makes it a natural for keeping the action open at all times other than when you are ready to fire. The repetition of drop a round in and close the bolt firmly establishes an awareness of when the gun is ready to fire vs when it is in a safe condition.
     
  17. TD1958

    TD1958 Member

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    Hi, I started both my grandsons(small framed boys)on 12 ga. guns with 7/8 ounce and (you will need to experiment) low powder charges of either red dot or promo and you will not beleive how easily they handle what little recoil ther is because of the weight of the gun. Thanks and good luck, Tim Dearth
     
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trap gas for a 8 year old