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Stupid powder question

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by dhip, Oct 29, 2012.

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  1. dhip

    dhip Active Member

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    OK,probably been asked a hundred times.It's just that when I see my friend loading handgun and rifle ammo using half the gr we use,I have to ask.Why can't we use the same powder in shotshells and save powder.Is it the weight of the shot?The solid brass shells?If you put let's say the same load,4gr of rifle powder in a shot shell,why wouldn't i work as long as you didn't use the shotshell amount.I did notice that in one load he could use green dot,but I think that was the only cross over I seen.

    Doug H.
     
  2. Jeffnet

    Jeffnet TS Member

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    All powders have a specific burn rate, if the manufacturer does not list a specific powder for a specific caliber than I would suggest not using it in that caliber. Shotgun powders are not recommended in rifle rounds, I believe some maybe used in pistol rounds but you need to know which ones. Don't blow your gun and you up....Jeff
     
  3. MNGuns

    MNGuns Member

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    Red Dot, Unique, Blue Dot, Universal, etc, are all used in handgun and even some lead bullet rifle loads. Pick up a reloading manual and flip through it. You may be surprised.... ;)



    Cliff Blick
    Princeton, MN
     
  4. TEXASZEPHYR

    TEXASZEPHYR Member

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    Dhip, If you notice when your friend loads pistol and rile bullets, the best loads are when the case is full with just enough room for the bullett to be pressed into the case. A lot of powders that we use for shotgun are ok for pistol ie red dot and herco for 2. The rifle powders develope lots of pressure and would not be good for shotgun in the large guages. you need to get a good reloading book from one of the main bullet companies. one i alway keep is speers reloading manuel and there lot other. I have known of ome to use pistol powder in shot hell. I don't recomend it unles you can find a recipe from a powder mfg. You have to remember that the powders are a propellant and are desighed for a particular burn rate to use in a specific situation. No cross-overs unless it is in the load books. Hope this helps answer your question. get into loading your own it can be a lotof fun and is a whole nuther education,

    Bob
     
  5. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    It's the size of the bore. The smaller the bore, the potential for higher pressure. Just look at the different powders between a 12 gauge vs. a .410

    A .410 powder like W296 or H110 would never work in a 12 gauge. To slow for a 12 and would not produce enough pressure. On the other hand, W296 and H110 makes an exellant powder for straight walled cases like a .44 magnum.

    If I remember right, You use about 3 x more H110 in a .410 than you use in a .44.

    Wayne
     
  6. jakeduke

    jakeduke Member

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    Depends on what you want to load for. I have loaded reduced loads in Rifle cases with shotgun powder years ago with cast bullets. On some loads I used a filler in the case. Have you ever squirrel hunted with a reduced load in a.222 or .223 in the winter? I use to do well doing that. Some of the old Lyman rifle manuals had a lot of data for that. I guess I may be a little off track to your shotshell question.
     
  7. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I've loaded some Green Dot .44 Mag loads but strictly following the tested recipes. As stated above by several others, there are powders that can be used for both but don't assume all will safely. The .44 Mag loads I did with Green Dot were ok but Green Dot makes a better shotgun load than pistol load in my opinion.
     
  8. Model Number 12

    Model Number 12 TS Member

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    dhip, stupid questions are right up my alley.

    I have a .38 Special target load that uses 3.5 grains of Red Dot with a cast lead bullet. It is very pleasant to shoot, in fact my daughters used to really enjoy shooting it out of a S&W revolver.
     
  9. Reinz

    Reinz Member

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    The reason I love Clays powder so much is that I can use it most of my pistol AND ShotShell loads.
     
  10. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Short Answer - use reliable loading data from the powder manufacturer.

    The reason there are so many powders is because of the nearly unlimited combinations of payload and cartridge volume possible with all the different cailbers and gauges. The worst approach to handloading is over-simplification. One powder won't work for everything. The beauty of handloading is making high quality - high performance ammo and that means matching the best possible components up and installing them with precision in a case or hull.
     
  11. dhip

    dhip Active Member

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    Thanks all,Got the anwers I figured would come.I do reload,I do haver an alliant giude,and I usually go online to double check updated info.Just wanted to know,and got some very informative answers.Just makes me grind my teeth having to load 18grs. knowing he can load 4grs., and almost have as much fun.Guess I'll just have to accept spending more on powder than he does,LOL..

    Doug H.
     
  12. larryjk

    larryjk Member

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    I have kept all of the powder manufactuers manuals since I started in about 1952. The old manuals have alot of cross over uses of powder between shotgun and handgun. I still use IMR SR7625 in many revolver loads. They aren't as fast, but are very accurate and less recoil. It also fills a little more of the case for revolvers than most newer pistol powders.
     
  13. BT-100dc

    BT-100dc Active Member

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    All good responses. Best advice that I could give you is always follow printed reloading data. I would never substitute rifle for shotgun powder as shotgun barrels are not strong enough throughout the whole barrel as compared with a rifle barrel. When approaching maximum loads work up to 10% and test fire before you increase the charge and then adjust gradually. Look for high pressure signs such as flatten primers and so on. Bullet seat depth will also increase the pressure. Also, keep old reloading data as people on the blog will occasionally ask for some old data; I have some back 30 years. When reloading, let's say 16.2 grain Red Dot, STS case, Rem. Primer with a FIG8 wad is a good load but be carefule if you're dropping down in the 15.7 grain range. Underloading shells is a dangerous activity. Also, never mix powders. Live but don't die by the book. BT100dc
     
  14. DanLee

    DanLee Member

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    I smell a troll, but loading a shotshell with rifle powder probably would not blow up your gun. The reason is that progressive powders need pressure in order to burn efficiently. Shotshells don't provide the resistance that rifle powders require for a good burn. What you will have is a blooper.

    Dan
     
  15. wayneo

    wayneo Active Member

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    Yep, if you look at the two loads Barfin has listed The 12 gauge load would be around 9000 psi. The 44 Special around 13,000-13,500 psi. Bet thats a handful.

    Wayne
     
  16. eightbore

    eightbore Well-Known Member

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    The difference is the "burn rate". Google "gunpowder burn rate chart" and you will get a burn rate chart that will explain everything. Shotshell powder burn rates are on one end of the chart, and rifle powders are on the other end. Shotgun powders are "fast" and rifle powders are "fast".
     
  17. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    The reason I love <s>Clays</s> ClayDot powder so much is that I can use it most of my pistol AND ShotShell loads.
     
  18. Reinz

    Reinz Member

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    Big M - I just switched myself, I did not mention it in the post, because I did not want to confuse the guy further.
     
  19. Leo

    Leo Well-Known Member

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    Doug, it sounds like you need to buy a good handgun and have as much fun as your friend with a 4.0 gr pistol load and still have fun with your shotgun when you want to burn 19.6 grains of powder. With Christmas gift giving tradition coming up, I think I know what I would ask for. If it makes you feel better, one of my three rifles takes 65 Grains of powder and shoots a sixty cent bullet, the 12 gauge looks pretty good compared to that.
     
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