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Strings and Pattern and Speed ... But How Far Back

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by crusha, May 31, 2009.

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  1. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Didn't anybody tell you, it's at 24.4 yards. If you stand on the forward part of the yard line, you can get away with the piddly load, if you stand to the back of the pad, you need the other one. One yard farther back and you're totally cooked.

    Sheesh, I thought everybody knew this.
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    There are many variables that need to be considered. For example, the slower the speed of the shot, the tighter the pattern. Thus more pellets hit the target and deliver more energy necessary to break the target. HMB
     
  3. Ibex

    Ibex TS Member

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    twostraight,
    LOL! The pattern was tight all right, all the shot landed in a little heap about the size of a dinner plate right behind the trap house.

    Ibex
     
  4. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Neal R., there are four aspects to your questions. They are pellet hits, retained energy, speed and pattern density.

    Are multiple pellet hits required to break the target? The answer is no. Targets do not store energy. E.D. Lowry, Winchester's famed ballistician, proved that pellet strikes were individual events and a pellet either had enough retained energy to break the target, or it did not.

    Retained energy: for years I have read it takes around 0.5 ft/lb of retained energy to break the target. I personally use 0.6 ft/lb as my cut off point. For shot launched with a 3' velocity of 1150fps, #8 1/2 shot drops to 0.6 ft/lb at 42 yards; #8 @ 50.5; #7 1/2 @ 59. Since 42 yards is considered the average 27 yard handicap shot, any of these pellets will break the target. Adding more energy per pellet just breaks the target harder.

    Speed: many shooters notice the difference in times of flight at different speeds. I am one of them. Shooting slower loads (1125fps ~ 1150fps) at handicap seems to me to be bang......break. Loads in the 1200fps ~ 1235fps range appear to be bang...break. Bunker loads are so quick it almost seems to be break.bang. For some reason, my brain seems to think that 1200fps is just about right, and faster doesn't add anything. I definitely perceive 1150fps as slow.

    Pattern Density: enough is enough. Most of the big dawgs use 1 1/8oz 7 1/2 shot for 27 yard handicap. If you believe that #8 shot will break a 42 yard target (it will), then you are not handicapped by using a 1 ounce load of #8 in lieu of a 1 1/8oz load of #7 1/2. Pellet count is very close. Personally, I shoot 1 1/8oz #8 for handicap. I know there is sufficient retained energy, and I want the additional pellets.
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    zzt- I certainly agree with your comments about retained energy but I am still hung up on "adding more energy per pellet breaks the target harder". As a shot hits the target, it transferrers just enough energy to break the target and the shot travels on retaining the remainder of the energy. The threshold of energy to break the target seems to me to be the maximum possible energy that can be transfered to the target. This would be a simple break/no break situation and more energy would not break it harder.

    If 5 ft. pounds of energy will drive a small nail completely into a soft piece of wood, striking the nail with 10 ft. pounds will not drive it in further.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Pat, the 10 lb hit would drive the nail faster (and dimple the soft wood).

    A pellet imparts most (or all) of it's energy to the clay when it breaks it. You can clearly see this watching Welderman's videos. Some pellets stop dead, some bounce back. Increase the energy a pellet strikes the target with and you increase the speed of the pieces flying apart, and the distance they travel.
     
  7. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    ZZT
    A good post.

    Thank you.

    Don Verna
     
  8. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Very good Z man!! Hap
     
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