1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Stock Refinishing - True Confessions/Advice?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by johnhefley, May 15, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. johnhefley

    johnhefley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Messages:
    214
    Today I joined my friend Keith at the club for a couple of rounds of trap doubles and skeet.

    One of the guns I brought is a Winchester Diamond Grade 101 trap combo.

    When I took it out of the gun case, I noticed some dings in the stock that apparently resulted when I loaned it to a family member during a recent visit. (Lesson learned).

    Long story short, I was so irritated by the dings in this (previously) undamaged gun, that I took an iron and wet cloth to it to try to remove the dings.

    The sensible readers all know what happened next: Although the dings began to shrink, the shiny finish clouded.

    More irritated, I decided that the only way to end my pain was to break out the sandpaper.

    So now I have a ding-free stock with most of the clearcoat sanded off behind the grip.

    I started with 320 grit, then moved to 400 (which obviously won't be the finest grit I use). End of True Confession.

    Time to ask for advice:

    1. Is it possible to only refinish PART of the stock (basically the part behind the pistol grip) without the whole thing coming out "looking like ass?"

    2. Is it possible to do this job without also refinishing the forend? (which as of now, looks just fine)

    3. I've been pretty careful with the sandpaper so far. I only half-assed masking off the checkering. I have not gimped the checkering, and hope not to. Any advice on protecting the checkering?

    4. Is it possible to just sand through the clearcoat, and re-clearcoat it without re-staining?

    5. Any other tips would be very helpful. I DID notice a few posts where someone did a magnificent refinish job and clearcoated with something purchased at Wal Mart. I guess I can do a search for that post to get more info.

    Thanks.
    jh
     
  2. johnhefley

    johnhefley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Messages:
    214
    My friend Keith had Joe from TronSpace Gunworks do some work on one of his shotguns a while back, and suggested I call Joe.

    Joe explained that he was a bit busy to take on my refinish job, but explained to me IN DETAIL how to do it myself. Further, he generously invited me to call him mid-process if I had any questions!

    Suddenly, my mood went from hopelessness to full confidence that I could do the refinish job myself!

    Thanks a million to Joe, who seems to be a great guy, and who is known to do fantastic work.

    Now I just have to go pick up some supplies...
    jh
     
  3. chuckie68

    chuckie68 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,839
    Location:
    Royal Oak, Michigan
    johnhefley,

    Joe (alias; Tron) does indeed do fantastic work. I know him personally as I shoot in the same Sporting Clays league with him. However, away from his shop he is some kind of a character. I would recommend that you call him at least twice while you are doing the refinish, and remember to ask him how "kitty" is doing.

    Chuck
     
  4. johnhefley

    johnhefley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Messages:
    214
    Hi Chuck. Will do.

    After my conversation with Joe, I discovered a text message on my cell phone from him where he offered additional help.

    Joe's offer of knowledge and assistance to a COMPLETE STRANGER speaks volumes about him.

    jh
     
  5. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,413
    jh,

    I suggest that you take an old junk stock and hone your skills on that before you attempt to refinish your stock. HMB
     
  6. ldpace

    ldpace TS Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2012
    Messages:
    8
    What material did he recommend using in order to match the original finish?
     
  7. smokintom

    smokintom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,835
    Location:
    Ohio
    If you take your time you can do a great job yourself.A little 1200 grit wet/dry paper and TruOil will make it look great.Try it,you might be surprised.
     
  8. smokintom

    smokintom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,835
    Location:
    Ohio
    If you take your time you can do a great job yourself.A little 1200 grit wet/dry paper and TruOil will make it look great.Try it,you might be surprised.
     
  9. johnhefley

    johnhefley Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2012
    Messages:
    214
    Thanks for the input, gents.

    Here's the short version:

    1. Use Bix stripper (the spray version). Make sure to remove all metal and plastic parts first. Don't forget the rubber gloves.

    2. Remove the Bix with mineral spirits. Buy a gallon of the stuff, because you'll go through it quickly.

    3. Rinse the stock with a cloth saturated with water.

    4. Dry the stock with a hair dryer. (Midway's videos suggest using a heat gun)

    5. Sand the stock down to 800 grit sandpaper.

    6. De-whisker the stock with scotchbrite pad.

    7. Apply Minwax NEUTRAL stain using a lint-free non transferring cloth (used in automotive paint shops). Mask the checkering.

    8. Make a mixture of 50/50 Boiled Linseed Oil and Tung Oil. Add Japan Dryer (a couple of teaspoons - as directed). THEN thin the whole batch 4:1 with mineral spirits to help it soak into the wood.

    9. Repeat every other day until the wood grains no longer stand out. (I've read that up to 14 coats may be required).

    10. At the end, dab the checkering with the Linseed/Tung/Dryer/Mineral spirits gently with the non-transferring cloth. DO NOT fill the checkering.

    If anyone else has corrections/ideas, let me know.

    I only have one "junk" stock to practice on, and as much as that suggestion makes sense, I'll likely leave that stock "junky" so that my guests can use it without pissing me off when they ding it.
    jh
     
  10. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2010
    Messages:
    8,691
    Sounds good to me. Go for it!

    Personally, I would make it easier on myself, and just go with straight Tru-Oil. You can always easily repair any imperfections.
     
  11. globe fish

    globe fish Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2012
    Messages:
    302
    Location:
    arkansas
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.