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Stock Refinishing Tips and Tricks

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by gaengineer, Sep 22, 2013.

  1. gaengineer

    gaengineer Member

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    Mar 28, 2013
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    65
    I have decided to refinish a couple stocks on guns of mine. A beretta 686 field stock, a stevens 311, and a model 700 rifle stock. I will probably start with the 311 as it has less curvature, no checkering, and is less valuable to me than the others.

    I would like any tips you guys may have on good literature, websites, must have tools, stains, clear coats, etc. If you happen to have a pic that's easy to post of something you did or had done describing stain color and number of coats of stain and clear, please post it as it would be very beneficial.

    Another important question is "How do you deal with checkering?" Getting the existing stain out of the checkering?

    Thanks in advance for any advice you give.

    Marcus
     
  2. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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  3. Stl Flyn

    Stl Flyn Well-Known Member

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    Paint stripper, and a soft tooth brush. Run it in a circular motion on the checkering after letting the stripper work for a while. Keep it moist just like you would do on the stock. Keep working it. It will glob up on the bristles. Wipe it clean and keep doing it until it looks like it is drying out. Then let it dry and go over it again with a clean, dry, soft tooth brush again. You may have to re-point.
     
  4. az outlaw

    az outlaw Member

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    One word........CITRISTRIP....... Non-toxic water based all natural no fumes it's the best there is at stripping stock finishes. Spread it on the stock, work it in the checkering with a toothbrush and 1-2 hours later rinse in warm water and you are down to bare wood.You MAY have to make 2 attempts at it for a few stubborn spots but I am here to tell Ya that stuff works miracles. You can get it at Home Depot or Lowes or pretty much any hardware store and it is very in-expensive.

    Mark
     
  5. steele

    steele TS Member

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    Instead of buying commercial stripper, buy 1 quart of denatured alcohol & 1 quart of lacquer thinner. Mixed, this will make about 3 pints of stripper. A friend of mine restores expensive,antique furniture for a living. He told me this is the same formula as the commercial Fromsby stripper. He dips #000 steel wool & then uses circular motion to cut the finish. He did a stock for an old K32 & this was the only stuff to cut the Old Red finish. It will cut the finish without lifting the grain, saving lots of sanding. Butch from Pgh
     
  6. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    I just did a Browning Safari 30-06 that the finish was shot. It was stored in a damp basement and it just trashed the finish. Anyway I stripped it with paint remover and used OOO and or OOOO steel wool. Once you remove the paint remover, wipe the stock down with hot water and wipe it dry as fast as you can.

    For the checkering I used a stiff nylon brush to clean the checkering. It worked well.

    I used a stock oil to finish the stock. I also let the stock dry for about a week. It worked very well. I rubbed it in hard so it warmed up with the rubbing. Put as many coats on as you think it needs.
     
  7. gaengineer

    gaengineer Member

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    Great information. Thanks all.
     
  8. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Stl Flyn's method works well. I re-finished my Beretta 682 stock using his method and Tru-Oil. It turned out pretty darn nice in my opinion. He walked me through it from start to finish. It's a lot of work and takes quite a bit of time to do it right. It's a lot of work. I waited until the winter to do mine so I could take my time. The more coats the better and deeper the finish. I used 2000 grit after the final coat and then polished out the fine sanding marks with headlight lens restorer(Stl Flyn's suggestion). After that I used a furniture wax to shine it up. May not be how the pro's do it but it works. Did I mention its a lot of work?

    Next time I'll pay someone. LOL
    [​IMG]
     
  9. 87AA

    87AA TS Member

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    As I've said before, stock refinishing is the one "gunsmithing" thing shooters should do themselves.

    First suggestion is to do a bunch of research on the various refinishing techniques. Look at as many websites as possible. Furniture maker and bowl turner forums have some great info on finishing. There's 100s of ways to do it and 100s of products (finishes) depending on the type of finish you want to achieve. There's tung oil (pure or mixed), teak oil (pure or mixed), linseed oil (raw or boiled), urethane, polyurethane, epoxy, ect, plus combinations of all. Do you want to rub it on, spray it, brush it? There's a myriad of possibilities. Look at what others have done and mix and match the styles to suit your desired finish. Regardless, be prepared to spend an hour or so every day for a week or more. Refinishing IMO should not be a rushed project.

    My technique involves filling the pores several times with a mixture of bone black, 4F pumice, and linspeed. I then move to several coats of Waterlox (satin) finish. The Waterlox website has some very good info on wood finishing (bare or refinish).

    Good luck
     
  10. hera200

    hera200 Member

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    I didn't notice anyone mention that after sanding in each section, REMOVE the sticky wet excess with a clean soft cloth by wiping ACROSS the grain. This forces the wood slush down into the grain and allows the desired 'filled grain' finish to be achieved quicker than leaving the slush on top unevenly and going to the extra work of having to sand it all off when dry....BUD
     
  11. 682b

    682b Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Hi. There are many ways to refinish a stock I posted a how to thread called
    Gun Stock Refinishing Made EASY check it out you may get some tips. Bigboy
     
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