1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Stock Preservation Question

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Michael Gregory, May 21, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Michael Gregory

    Michael Gregory Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    257
    Location:
    Kommiefornia, but North Idaho soon... REALLY!
    Although admittedly this is not my field of expertise, I would not use lacquer, polyurethane, or anything that will cause a build, or thickness added over the wood. The fit of the stock to the receiver is very precise and building up 'finish' over this may tighten up the fit to the point where the stock could crack around the receiver, or at the upper or lower tangs. I would use 'pure' tung oil, applied and wiped off according to the directions, as I don't believe this will build any thickness. Try one or two coats. I believe this should seal the wood well. Any experienced stockmakers on here that have an opinion on this?? - Mike Gregory
     
  2. spritc

    spritc Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,483
    Location:
    Indiana
    I agree with Mike about sealing and not filling, even though I believe filling will not cause a stock to crack.


    Steve
     
  3. vdt

    vdt Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,977
    Location:
    ontario
    a little Birchwood Casey Tru-oil is what i use ,and if you can find a fellow to bed the receiver i would and also relieve the receiver....vdt
     
  4. Michael Gregory

    Michael Gregory Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2006
    Messages:
    257
    Location:
    Kommiefornia, but North Idaho soon... REALLY!
    Shootnclays - My thinking is: Necessary ... probably not, but not a bad idea if done properly. If you look you may find that this has already been done though. Preventing oil, solvent, or even water (if shooting in rain on occasion) from soaking into the stock will probably prolong it's life and beauty. - Mike
     
  5. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,964
    I saw a product made by Birchwood Casey that was specially made for this purpose but was not True Oil. Keeping oil and solvents away from the wood is a good idea.
     
  6. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,313
    Location:
    Brillion, WI
    When I used to make stocks, I would thin spar varnish 50/50 with a fast drying thinner and submerge the wood for 20 minutes until it had absorbed as much as possible. I would then remove the wood and wipe the surface dry and let it sit for 3 or 4 days until it was completely cured before applying the final finish. Using this procedure, there is no buildup at all. All the applied finish was wiped off or had soaked into the wood.

    In addition to preventing oil from saturating the end grain, the mixture soaked into and strengthened the cell structure of the wood and made it harder to dent with use.

    The same procedure could be used for an unfinished butt and metal to wood inleted areas of a stock. Any good exterior finish could be used, thinned 50/50 with solvent and applied to all raw wood, being careful to avoid its drying on areas of the stock with an applied finish. (Repeated wipes with a solvent-soaked cloth would do it.)

    As and aside, the effectiveness of the sealing would be reduced if the raw wood had previously absorbed much gun oil.

    Rollin
     
  7. Beancounter

    Beancounter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    482
    Sealing is a good thing to do. If your competition gun is going to see rain, you really need to do thins. If you are going to shell out bucks for a go away hunt and still hunt with a wooden stock, you also need to do this. forget oil and solvent, I never got that crap into my guns. But moisture, that is a different story. If you do not seal your stock, you are taking big chances. A wet stock can swell and change dimensions (it has to get really wet but on a hunt or at a shoot that can happen). That change can prevent the gun from operating, change the POI, all that. And it might not return to its original state.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.