1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Stock finishing tips?????......

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by GoldEx, Aug 11, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. GoldEx

    GoldEx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,228
    Location:
    Howell, MI
    I am in the process of finishing a stock for my old Citori combo and have got the wood where I want it now. Have been shooting the gun with no finish on it for a few months and am happy with the results. I was just planning on putting a good coat or three of Birchwood Casey Tru Oil on it and call it good. This stock is not a show piece by any stretch and I am not really concerned about looks. I just want to have some weather protection. My question here is that the grain on the stock is very porous and I want to fill them in before finishing it off. What kind of sanding sealers do you recommend? I still have a bottle of water based sanding sealer from my kids pinewood derby cars from last year. Is that sufficient of should I be looking at something else???

    Jeff
     
  2. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,417
    Use tung oil. Cut it 50/50 with mineral spirits and apply a few coats until the pores are filled. Then use full strength, sand and repeat, until you get the finnish you like. HMB
     
  3. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,398
    Tru Oil is a sealer/filler finsh but it is going to take many more than a coat or two of the stuff. Brownells has some fillers that you can use first and that will reduce the number of coats of Tru Oil required. But still, two or three won't get done. By shooting the gun unfinished for a while, you have also introduced human oils and sweat and such into the raw wood. This certainly has the effect of staining and might affect the ability of the wood to take filler and finish. PS - mask off the checkering but also get a riffling file to clean it up anyway.
     
  4. Force Break

    Force Break TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    300
    Go with the tung oil as stated above, and if you want a nice satin finish in the end, mix some FFF pumice with pure lemon oil to nock the shine down. I have just refinished my umpteenth stock this way and they all are more than serviceable. With tung oil they are easy to repair if you do beat one up.
    Go Well
    Wayne
     
  5. claybuster38

    claybuster38 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Messages:
    99
    To save yourself a lot of time and get a first class finish. Fill with some filler with fullers earth. Let dry well and wet sand to fine finish. then use a sealer(protectects against moisture. Fine steel wool it offafter drying. Now start your oils. thin layers rubbed in by hand. Dry for atleast 24 hours each in good drying conditions. Lighyly steel wool with 4-0 between. May take 6or 8 coats to fill remsining pores to surface level. Steel wool off and shoot it . Six months later when the base is firm, lay on a couple of true
    oil coats let dry for sometime pumice or steel wool and wax-- off and you will have something to behold. Most people don't have the patience to stretch out the process. Several coats of clear Minwax sealer and you can fine sand( 400-600wet or dry paper while wet with sealer finish and you will have a good durable finish. Dont use Varithane or equivilent. Hell to pay later if youever want to do again. Marv White
     
  6. acre44

    acre44 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    188
    I have refinished furniture for years and if you want a wood finish that is as good (and probably better) as any of the high priced 0/U's (and will last forever), I suggest the following:

    Take the wood off the gun, and remove all metal. Wipe down with acetone several times to remove all of the skin oil, and factory finish. You will get a bleached look, don't worry. Decide if you want to re-stain to obtain different or darker finish. I usually refinish with Watco danish oil finish in dark or black walnut. It is thin, easy to use, and really brings out the grain.

    After re-staining, let completely dry and mix mixture of 1/2 pure tung oil, 1/4 quality low gloss varnish, and 1/4 turpentine. Wipe this mixture onto wood liberally and let sit for 15 to 20 minutes. Recoat, wipe off excess and let dry. After drying, go over with fine steel wool, and recoat. You should put at least 4 coats on with at least 24 hour drying time between coats. Each coat will give you a little more gloss. When you get the result you like let dry and do not steel wool.

    You will be absolutely amazed at the finish you get. It will have a deep rubbed gloss appearance and is extremely durable.

    You can coat all of the wood with this mixture and really soak the hidden parts of the wood. It will become impervious to water etc...

    This is a permanent treatment and you should have no more problems.

    The best thing about this process is that if you nick or scrape the finish, you can just lightly steel wool the area and reapply the tung oil finish. It will blend in perfectly and you come out with a perfect match and no evidence of repair.
     
  7. GoldEx

    GoldEx Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,228
    Location:
    Howell, MI
    Thanks for all of the ideas. Problem now is that after reading your input, I do not have enough time to do any of this before heading to the Cardinal Center (leaving a week from tomorrow) and I do not want to run the risk of stock that is sticky, etc. What would be a good "Temporary" finish until I get back that will give reasonable protection yet allow me to sand it off easily before going ahead with the permanent finishing process? I am going to apply a sealer to the inside of the stock and under the buttplate but what to use on the exterior??

    Jeff
     
  8. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,753
    Stick with the Tru-oil. You don't really need anything else. But as stated above, you'll need more than a few coats. It is also very easy to repair.
     
  9. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    433
    acre44, you said"Wipe this mixture onto wood liberally and let sit for 15 to 20 minutes" do you rub this on with your fingers or a cloth?
    I have a rifle stock I'm refinishing & would like to try your recipe.
    E-mail me if you have any other tips & suggestions.

    Thanks,
    i_shoot
     
  10. claycruncher

    claycruncher TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    169
    acre44: I too want to try your process. Please email me any other tips you have as well. If you don't mind, email me your phone number and I will call you at your convenience. Thank you for your consideration. Jim Pappas
     
  11. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,753
    I recommend Permalyn. It's a polymer with all the attributes espoused by acre44 and can be recoated in about 4hrs. Very hard and durable, easy to repair. Available from Brownells.
     
  12. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,650
    I don't like to use filler on a beautiful pice of wood, as it hides some of the beauty of the grain.

    Slobber on all the TrueOil that it will soak up, then lightly wipe it down, then take a wire coat hanger and straighten it out, run it thru the hole in the stock and hang it up for a few days.

    Now I use a spray can of urethane varnish and keep coating it every few hours until the grain is completely filled. Hang it up until it has gotten cured and hard.

    Sand with 400 wet/dry paper to get out the 'orange peel', then another coat of spray varnish.

    You wind up with a tough finish that REALLY shows off the grain.
     
  13. claycruncher

    claycruncher TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    169
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,556
    First stain if you want to change the color. Let stain dry for 24 hours. Then go to any paint department and get a can of sander/sealer. Use this to seal and fill up the pores. The stuff will dry to the touch in 15 minutes and can be sanded in 30-45 minutes. Apply as many coats as needed to fill the pores. Sand with 180 grit paper between coats. After it is filled and sealed,sand with 220 followed by 280 grit paper. Then you can apply whatever finish to the level, smooth surface created by the sander sealer. After you get that part, write to me about how to polish the final finish coat with a buffing wheel. True Oil is easy to work with but takes a very long time to fill the pores.

    Take the time to do it right. E-mail me if you have any problems. I have refinished something like 150 gun stocks. After you learn how to finish, then I will talk with you about learning how to checker stocks. That is more fun than finishing one.

    Pat Ireland
     
  15. acre44

    acre44 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    188
    i shoot, yes you definitely want to use a cloth for that step. I do the mixture in a butter dish. Do not save any of the mixture, dump it out. Remix your next batch for the next coat. If you follow the proportions exact you will end up with flawless wood.
     
  16. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    433
    Thanks acre44, I appreciate it.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.