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Stock cracked

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Herman63, Aug 22, 2008.

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  1. Herman63

    Herman63 Member

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    Last year I bought a new beretta combo, maybe a year and half old. Was looking at it today and the stock has a half inch crack that goes from the tang behind the trigger gaurd to the checkering that is near the trigger on the palm grip.

    This would be a eell combo gun.

    My question is should this be replaceable by beretta as I have not abused this gun and really have not shot it much? and if so should I go through the people I bought it from. I just noticed it and they are closed but plan on contacting them first thing on monday when they open.

    Just never been in this situation and want some advice.

    Thank you, Herman63
     
  2. ec90t

    ec90t Guest

    Best place to start, is the dealer you purchased it from.

    ec90t
     
  3. Fritzboy

    Fritzboy TS Member

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    My behind is cracked and it works fine
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    It can be repaired. I have done many cracked stock repairs. I recommend thinking along the lines of epoxy and possibly steel pins. I would never consider super glue.

    The Beretta service department does have the reputation of sometimes requiring several months to do a repair that can take less than 30 minutes time.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    I have had a lot of luck with local furnture restore/refinisher. Has repaired several stocks and a few tables. very good, slow but good.
     
  6. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Steel pins are a poor replacement for wood. I always use bamboo or small walnut dowels that I turn. Some times the crack is very small or only in the finish and super glue is the only thing that will work.

    Hoosier is right a luthier may be a good choice.

    I do quite a bit of this kind of work. Until I see the crack I couldn't tell you the best way to go.

    The wood is probably the problem and Beretta will tell you that they don't guarantee the wood after all they didn't make it. God did.

    Since the gun is an EELL it probably has a nice piece of wood: and it isn't a cheap gun. I would suggest a complete refinish at the time of repair if a competent person does the work it will be virtually invisible.

    Joe goldberg

    There aren't a lot of people who specialize in this kind of work, and it won't be cheap. However it will be a fraction of the cost of a new stock.

    I could do the work if your interested. You could ship the complete receiver and buttstock to Bart's Sports world Glen Burnie MD Attn Joe Goldberg.

    I can also recommend Ed Anderson at the Beretta gallery in NYC

    Both Ed and my self will stand behind our work. In my case I will guarantee the repair and if it ever cracks again in the same place I will either re repair it for free or give your money back.
     
  7. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

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    Of all the advice given:
    First contact Berretta/dealer you bought from
    Second: If you don't like the words from Beretta, I would contact Joe Goldberg or other stock professional for a repair. I would not take advice from anyone who does not do this for a living (example: you cannot make steel adhere to wood).
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Gary- It is true that I no longer make custom stocks and I have closed my checkering and engraving operations. They were fun, but little financial reward.

    It is very simple and common to make steel adhere to wood. The most common way is by simple friction. That system holds your house together. For stock repair. a steel pin supported with epoxy can work very well. If you doubt the adhesion of epoxy/steel you can test the question easily. Drill two small holes in a piece of wood. Into one, simply twist in a screw. In the other, put a dab of epoxy and then insert a screw. After 48 hours, remove both screws, or at least attempt to remove the screws.

    Steel pins are excellent for repairing small cracks in thin areas such as the forearm. They are placed into groves cut at right angles to the crack on the inside and do not show.

    Joe, who has much more experience than I have, prefers wood cross supports over my preference of counter sunk steel pins. Joe will also agree that every woodworker develops techniques that work for him.

    Joe- If you have a need for a supply of raw bamboo (diameter from too small to measure easily to two inches, let me know. I can send you a little or a lot for only the cost of postage. I can supply you with lengths from one inch to 30 feet. Green bamboo is easier for me to cut and it dries in about 60 days. The stuff is really strong and it is growing about 50 feet from my side door. The quantity is nearly unlimited.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. Herman63

    Herman63 Member

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    Well it has gotten worse I was trying to take a picture of it and now it in two pieces. pretty much the left side is broken off right before the bolt.

    Herman63
     
  10. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Pat next time you are repairing a crack try a bamboo skewer available at almost all grocery stores for around $2 for a hundred. Steel is stronger than wood and if it is in a place where the wood flexes at all it will stress the wood and can help it to crack. Ask Dennis Devault he told me that since I shared this with him repairing cracks has been much easier.

    On another note since I moved my supply of bamboo which i had growing in my back yard also has disappeared. In the large diameter pieces when you cut it what would you say the wall thickness is. I'm looking for a source that I can split and make bamboo blanks for fly rods.

    Joe
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Joe- The wall thickness of my bamboo is around 1/8 inch. I know there are many different types of bamboo and I do not know which ones are suitable for fly rods. You are welcome to what I have but getting it to you green might be a problem.

    Crack Repair- Steel is stronger than wood and I under stand the logic about wood/steel difference causing stress to other areas. But, I believe that the epoxy surrounding the steel is less flexible than the steel. Wouldn't the epoxy result in more stress than the steel? When repairing a crack in a forearm, I always cut a V groove on the inside of the forearm with checkering files. I then cut a few cross channels at right angles to the crack. I put the steel pins in the cross channels and then filled all of the grooves with epoxy. I wiggled the wood so that the epoxy would show slightly on the finished side and then wiped it off. I would clamp the wood as well as possible.

    I will pick up some bamboo skewers and play with them.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

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    Too many subjects but Herman63 needs to get the attention of Beretta and or his dealer. If you are hoping for any kind of renumeration, do not do anything to the gun before hearing fron Beretta. If you do, you will never a nickel from the company. I am only saying that if you take on the repair now and on your own, Beretta might tell you where the door is later.

    To Mr Ireland, I am not a fan of steel repairs for wood. The only thing I would do is a steel crossbolt on heavy recoiling rifles. But you and I do not agree on other things either. Example: I would never bend a barrel to change POI because raising the comb is much easier but you actually believe in barrel bending even though steel has a memory and will return to shape. that does not mean one of us is more right than the other, it just means we have different opinions.

    Regards
    Gary
     
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