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Stock bending info. needed

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Ron M, Jun 14, 2008.

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  1. Ron M

    Ron M Member

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    I have an mx 10 I bought it with custom wood and adjustable comb left handed by the way the problem is the stock is stright and I can't get it over quite far enough.I would like info on who does bending.
    thanks Ron
     
  2. ramorton

    ramorton TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Ron, send it to Larry Garroutte in Oklahoma. I wouldn't try to bend the stock, I went thru that and it didn't work. Oh, I know they will tell you how they guarantee the bend, forget it. Have Larry inlet your stock at the receiver like it is supposed to be done. I too am left handed, and have been thru this numerous times. Perazzi also makes left hand stocks. call Doug Gray in Amarillo and he can get you a left hand stock from Perazzi, he can also order it with your dimensions. Larry Garroutte, cell-918-906-2457 Doug Gray, mynewshotgun.com and and also is in Trap and Field. Hope this helps, Roy
     
  3. Fast Oil

    Fast Oil TS Member

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    Ron, not sure from message if the stock is left handed or you are left handed.

    Before you go and spend money to bend a stock you should have a qualified gun fitter that uses a fitting plate inspect your gun and do a POI.

    We do gun fittings/POI at our facility and have access to people that do stock bending. Call me at work (919)774-7080 after 11:30am today and I'll help you with any questions.

    Scott
     
  4. tcenfarms

    tcenfarms TS Member

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    I was told the stocks untwist after a few year.

    the best thing to do is have a stock made to fit

    Nate
     
  5. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have bent a few stock with mixed results. Others have had better results than me. It could be possible that a good adjustable comb would be a better solution to your problem.

    Pat Ireland
     
  6. ps8182

    ps8182 TS Member

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    Being a left hander I have bent a few Perazzi stocks to fit me with success over the years. First secure the stock with a vise, weight, slightly open drawer or other means so that the gun is positioned horizontal to the ground. I use two clamp style heat lamps on either side of the pistol grip to slowly heat it up. At the same time hang some weight on the end of the barrel. Be sure to take a measurement from the muzzle to the ground and keep repeating and recording this measurement over a few hours. It will take a while but the stock will begin to bend and when you are satisfied with the amount of bend remove the heat lamps and let stock cool over night with the weight still on the barrel. Be sure not skip the last step or the stock bend back to its original position. You may have to repeat this process a few times to get the result you are looking for, just take your time and don’t get the heat lamps to close unless your want a pair of dark spots on the pistol grip. I would only recommend this process if you are looking to add or reduce a little bit of cast to the gun anything more would require a gunsmith with a jig set up for bending stocks.
     
  7. Ed Y

    Ed Y TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Pat, I've done hundreds of them with all positive results. I never had one "Go back"

    Ed Yanchok
     
  8. ramorton

    ramorton TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Ed, please call me at 903-315-6200, I would like to discuss a project with you regarding an offset stock. I am traveling all week, so my e-mail is not answered until friday. Thanks, Roy
     
  9. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Don't bend a perazzi if you don't know what your doing. Most of them end up cracking at the trigger bow an inherent design flaw you might say not enough wood to stand the stress. Give the stock to a real Stockmaker to see if he can modify the stock for you but don't bend it unless you want to make a new stock anyway. I used to bend stocks but gave up you'll get mixed results if you live in a dry environment where the temperature and humidity never exceed sixty degrees go for it.
    Joe goldberg
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Ed- I know you have bent many with good luck. I have bent a few with less than good luck. Could it be possible that something other than luck is involved?

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. Ron M

    Ron M Member

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    Thanks for all the help. The gun does have an adjustable comb, after my post I was able to get a little more adjustment with some manipulation but then the main part of the stock was into my jaw. After a wood plain a rasp & a lot of sanding all is looking good now just waiting for first coat of polyurethane to dry. Ron
     
  12. beaker100

    beaker100 Member

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    hi ron, stock bending can be done and is used by the finest gunmakers in the world. part of haveing a gun built by makers such as holland & holland is fittings that are finished with stock bending for the perfect fit.

    the key is using hot oil to properly heat the wood. this is done over a approx 1-2 hour procedure, then making the bend and slowly cooling the stock off over a long period of time (overnight).

    the proper tool is a large tool that the entire gun is secured into. this tool also has graduated scales built in for cast, drop, and twist. the stock bender also has a circulation pump, heater. and filter so the oil can be checked constantly .

    the problem with using other heat sources ( heat lamps. heating pads so forth) is that they rely on heating the moisture in the wood to steam to get the wood pliable enough to bend. this dries the wood out and can lead to cracks.

    jmho doug hubbart
     
  13. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    If you were to bend a stock using oil, how would you get all of the oil out, if you were to refinish the wood, using something other than an oil?

    I've been using a wet steam for several years; mounting the gun into a steel framed fixture. I've bent a few dozen in the last couple of years for a few of the S/S shooters around the area. The "wet-steam" is the key. Too hot, and you destroy the bond that holds the grain together. By having a wet steam with practicly no pressure, the wood will dry back out to it's original moisture content.

    Heat works well on oil stocks. At times, on a poly stock also, but with so many types of poly finishes, a lot of them will want to blister with the smallest amount of heat.

    There are a few websites that help in explaining the bending of wood. Here's one...

    http://solidwoodbending.net/index.htm

    Doug Braker
     
  14. beaker100

    beaker100 Member

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    hi titewad2 h i have one but have not set it up yet. my intention is to get it running in the next 6 months or so. i did have the experance to use this machine before moving it to my shop. it worked great. i also had the chance to see one in use in california bay area many years ago. there was an old gentleman there that was the us repair station for holland & holland or purdy, i can not remember which that did that kind of work. a great craftsman.

    hi doug, i like the idea of wet steam. i might have to try that. get the heat in without drying the wood.

    useing boiled linn seed oil i have not heard of problems with the wood retaining the oil. also i have seen this process used on finished stocks with no harm to the finish. some guns ( old winchesters, old red kreighoffs, old superpoised brownings,particulary the ones with a checked finished alresdy) will need refinishing after this process.

    as each piece of wood is different there is no way i have been able to determine how much bend, how long it will stay bent, and the chance of cracks appearing after/during the bending process. i have seen it is rare to have problems with good walnut but anything is possable. less than 1% to my experance.

    doug hubbart
     
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