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static electricty

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by lewis singleton, Nov 30, 2007.

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  1. lewis singleton

    lewis singleton TS Member

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    I'm a new trap shooter.
    When I reload and drop a powder charge the flakes of powder
    won't stay in bottom of the hull.The powder attaches itself to the sides
    of the hull. Can any one help with problem. Thanks lewis singleton
     
  2. jmas

    jmas TS Member

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    I used to cut a strip of fabric softener sheet (Downey) and hang it down into the powder hopper to take the static out. Worked 4 me.

    jmas
     
  3. scott calhoun

    scott calhoun Well-Known Member

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    Lewis -

    Depending on where you load, you might need to consider running a humidifier especially now that it's getting colder (and dryer) in many parts of the country.

    I do a couple of things to cutdown on static electricity when I load.

    - Do the dryer sheet thing described above, and be sure to change it occassionally as it will dry out. Also make sure you don't allow it to hang so far down that it gets into the neck of the powder bottle and cause blockage.
    - Prior to loading I spray the area with a few shots of StaticGard. A spray across the loader, one in the area of the wads and one in the area of the hulls, and then I make a couple of passes on the carpet floor where I'll be standing.

    I keep a digital thermometer with humidity read-out on my loading bench and try to keep the humidity above 40 percent, especially in the winter.

    I've also found that some powders are more prone to static than others, but there's not much you can do about that unless you are willing to change what you are loading.

    Scott
     
  4. Chichay

    Chichay TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Can static electricity ignite powder?
     
  5. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    If there is a copper water pipe nearby you can ground the reloading press. HMB
     
  6. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    If trying to ground the press, be sure to install a 1 MegOhm 1/2 Watt resistor in series in that circuit. It can help if you have a ground issue and will not have any adverse effect on the circuits ability to dissipate static. It's highly recommended for safety reasons and is installed in 99% of commercial ESD grounding devices.

    I'd just recommend using a humidifier or dryer sheets, or both. The humidity is the key and if you humidify the air, you are ahead of the game.
     
  7. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Chichay- The small spark resulting from discharge of a static potential did not ignite powder in the 30 or so times I tested this possibility.

    I did use a fabric softener sheet in the powder bottle and grounded my press. After doing this, someone pointed out that my press was already grounded through the hydraulic system.

    Pat Ireland
     
  8. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Lewis, even after you try all the tricks listed, you'll still have the problem, because they will only eliminate the minor causes of static, not the major. The major cause of powder clinging to the side of hulls is you. You introduced a static charge just by picking it up and placing it in the loader. You cannot eliminate that even if you put the hulls in a metal pan and ground the pan. You have to ground yourself.

    Forget all the other tricks and go and buy yourself a small anti-static mat to stand on. Connect the end of the wire provided to a suitable grounding point (see instructions that come with the mat) and stand on it while reloading. If that isn't practical, get a smaller one and put it on your loading bench. Put your empties on it. That drains static from them, and you every time you pick on up. If you touch the anti-static pad and the press or powder hopper, any static on them is drained.

    The soles of the shoes you wear may have an influence on how well the floor mat works. When using a table mat, if you rub the hull, even slightly, when you insert it into the loader you will still introduce a static charge, because neither you or the press is grounded at that point.
     
  9. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Listen to zzt, wrap yourself in anti static sheets, when you look like the mummy you will be ready to reload. HMB
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    zzt- Would it help if I attached a heavy copper wire to a water pipe and stuck the other end into some part of my body? If this would work, can you suggest where I might stick it?

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    It might Pat, but I'd think standing on an anti-static floor mat would be more comfortable than any of the places I'd suggest (g). Certainly more comfortable than wrapping yourself in anti-static sheets, and most certainly better smelling.
     
  12. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    If grounding will eliminate Lewis's problem then why doesn't grounding eliminate static cling in my clothes? My clothes dryer is grounded.
     
  13. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Grounding will not eliminate the static being discussed here. Plastic is a non conductor, so electricity will not conduct through the plastic to ground. The only time that static electricity will move from a nonconductor to a ground is when the potential becomes great enough to jump to the ground. That is the spark we feel when it happens. Any potential less will remain. That is what we see when powder flakes dance on a hull. The only way to try to eliminate it would be with an air ionizer, anti-static spray or dryer sheets. Even then I don't think it will be entirely eliminated.
     
  14. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    zzt has it nailed. He must have experience with ESD procedures. In addition, static build up can be very rapid, and bleed-off is slow. Excessive, or even minimal handling of a hull immediately before dropping powder into it will almost always result in an excessive amount of powder lining the hull wall.

    I use a 9000 on top of an Auto-Mate which means both are grounded. I have no static problems. If a hull is overly handled, it sits on a grounded metal pad for at least 2 minutes before use. Longer if time allows. Picking up the hull from the hull bag by the very mouth of the hull only, does help, at least with the way a MEC drops powder at the bottom of the hull.

    Powder on the hull wall is a pet peeve of mine, and the above procedures do prevent it, for me anyway.
     
  15. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Paladin, You're right about handling a plastic hull, it makes static worse. How do you slowly "bleed-off" static from plastic by placing it on a grounded metal pad. Plastic is a nonconductor. Static electricity in plastic can only be dissipated when the potential is great enough to jump through the air to a lower potential. Any potential that is less than enough to make the jump will stay there forever.
     
  16. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    "Static electricity in plastic can only be dissipated when the potential is great enough to jump through the air to a lower potential. Any potential that is less than enough to make the jump will stay there forever."

    I disagree with you there Jerry. Static will bleed slowly. It has to. A hull does not stay charged forever.

    The "spark" you mention is the result of much build up, and sudden discharge. Static bleeds, fast and slow.
     
  17. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Electricity does not move through a non-conductor. If it did, we could not insulate electric wires. As you claim, it would slowly bleed through to ground.
     
  18. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    It's extremely rare for static electricity to ignite smokeless powder.<br>
    <br>
    On the other hand, blackpowder is easily ignited by static electricity. I know most of you do not load with blackpowder, but I thought I'd point that out.<br>
    <br>
    As or plastic being non-conductive, thus not being easily grounded, I've wondered aout using conductive paint to line powder hoppers. Conductive paints are commonly used for metal plating non-metalic items that cannot conduct electricity. I was going to test this one winter when static electricity was really bad, but never got around to it. Click the link for more information.
     
  19. Paladin

    Paladin Well-Known Member

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    "Electricity does not move through a non-conductor"

    I agree. The key is, what's on the non-conductor.

    Why do you think static build up is noticeably higher in low humidity? And, there is more "bleed through to ground" with electricity than most people realize. They think because they can't see or feel it, it's not flowing,,and that is wrong.
     
  20. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    jerryp, you are confusing the properties of static electricity with those of normal electricity. Static electricity is a STATIC charge accumulated on a SURFACE. It does not matter what material the surface is made of. All that matters is the surface has a surplus or deficiency of electrons. That problem, positive or negative charge will slowly correct itself just by contact with air. Slowly, because there are not huge numbers of ions in air. It can discharge at a rate of one ion at a time.

    Place it in contact with a conductor and the charge will rapidly drain. Place enough of a static charge on a surface and bring it into close proximity with something containing the opposite charge and the negatively charged item will ionize the air between them and discharge the static. That is the spark you speak of.
     
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